Snub Nose Revolver???

Check out the Ruger LC9. Much smaller/lighter. A little better stopping power than a .38.
 

I am considering the LC9, sp101, and equivalent Smith and Wessons.


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I love my .38 LCR. Surprisingly accurate for me, and easy to carry. I'd love it if Ruger would come out with a .45 ACP or .44 Special version though.
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After so much research my brain hurts, I carry a Ruger LCR.357mag/.38spl loaded with either Winchster PDX1 .38spl+P 130gr or CorBon DPX 110gr .357mag (when available). I respect the findings of M.Ayoob et al, with "actual" shootings as their basis, that a .357mag 110-125gr JHP cartridge from any of the major manufacturers is the most powerful, effective, proven, one shot man-stopper available today. With gel tests as most standards are considered, they mostly always confirm this position also. A good JHP .38spl+p 115-135gr is a close second, along with the similarly configured 9mm+P 110-135gr. I would trust any of those with my safety. Using a 5-Star Speedloader with same ammo for a reload, I never feel outgunned for most encounters. Take care and be safe.All above is IMHO.
 
The only benefit to a snub nose revolver (in my opinion) is that it's capable of being carried inside the pocket if you so wish where a longer barrel would be detrimental to that cause. The shorter barrel causes substantial loss of muzzle velocity and hinders accuracy to greatly to appeal much to me. I will admit though I have been considering a Ruger LCR 357.... for pocket carry as previously mentioned.
 
The only benefit to a snub nose revolver (in my opinion) is that it's capable of being carried inside the pocket if you so wish where a longer barrel would be detrimental to that cause. The shorter barrel causes substantial loss of muzzle velocity and hinders accuracy to greatly to appeal much to me. I will admit though I have been considering a Ruger LCR 357.... for pocket carry as previously mentioned.

That's interesting you say this about barrel length affecting accuracy. For the most part I would have to completely agree with you. Which is why, my experience to this day still baffles me. I have a S&W Model 637 CT. It has a 1 7/8" barrel. Yet this thing is a tack driver at 25 yards (3-4 inch groups on average)!! I don't get it. It's more accurate than most of my handguns. Who would've thunk?
 
That's interesting you say this about barrel length affecting accuracy. For the most part I would have to completely agree with you. Which is why, my experience to this day still baffles me. I have a S&W Model 637 CT. It has a 1 7/8" barrel. Yet this thing is a tack driver at 25 yards (3-4 inch groups on average)!! I don't get it. It's more accurate than most of my handguns. Who would've thunk?

There's a video on YouTube of a guy shooting the Ruger LCR 357 at 105 yards. He hits a steel gong every time. Not bad for a 1 7/8" 357 :)

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In my mind, a lot of the "barrel length jargon" affecting shot placement, or any other arguable point, is an excuse for poor marksmanship.
Just saying.
 
In my mind, a lot of the "barrel length jargon" affecting shot placement, or any other arguable point, is an excuse for poor marksmanship.
Just saying.

There's actual physics that uphold the idea that barrel length will do two things:
- increase the velocity of the round, and
- if the barrel is straight, improve accuracy.

For the first part, when you increase the amount of time the built up gases are pushing the round forward, you increase the speed of the bullet. In other words if I push on you a little bit, you will accelerate a little bit. If I push on you for an extended time, then you will in turn be moving faster.

For the second part, if the round has some slight wobble in a long barrel, the barrel should straighten the bullets motion. In a short barrel, if the round is not going completely straight, you will have some slight wobble in flight. This is the reason why most short barreled handguns do not have near the accuracy as longer barreled counterparts.

However, if one needs an excuse for poor shooting, getting a short-barreled handgun and blaming it on it is a wonderful excuse. ;-)
 
wolf_fire, Sir, you are very correct, albeit that info pertained to older model handguns per se. Today's handguns, with the superior (maybe) machinery and computerized construction, refined steel components, i.e.-stronger, precise, etc., finding a "crooked" barrel, even at 1.8in would be a rare occurrence. Also, new powder compositions for "short barrelled" firearms to compensate, giving comparable velocities to older formulas, are being promoted today. Therefore, today's shorter barrrelled handguns, IMHO, are much more accurate (proven by many, variable Vids on YT, and my actual experience with 2 SB handguns), and verifiable by the physics and logics stated by you above. Thank you!
 
wolf_fire, Sir, you are very correct, albeit that info pertained to older model handguns per se. Today's handguns, with the superior (maybe) machinery and computerized construction, refined steel components, i.e.-stronger, precise, etc., finding a "crooked" barrel, even at 1.8in would be a rare occurrence. Also, new powder compositions for "short barrelled" firearms to compensate, giving comparable velocities to older formulas, are being promoted today. Therefore, today's shorter barrrelled handguns, IMHO, are much more accurate (proven by many, variable Vids on YT, and my actual experience with 2 SB handguns), and verifiable by the physics and logics stated by you above. Thank you!

Excellent points.

One thing I did neglect to mention... if one has just a little bit of movement when shooting a short barreled firearm vs. a long barreled, that movement will be exaggerated down range. This is another reason why people tend to "blame" the short-barreled firearm.

Again, it comes down to how good is one with their particular firearm.
 
I love my snubbie, Even though the cylinder is the thickest part I conceal it as well and as comfortable as my BG380! Longer barrels can poke you in the side, but no big deal either way. For a CC Revolver, I like the 1.8" barrel. It's plenty accurate. I can't make my mind up on the revolver vs semi which is why I have both.
 
Snubbies are very easy to carry concealed without a holster. I have 2 38's...one snubby and one 4" barrel. I like em both but the snubby is what I will carry.
 
best of both worlds ?

I often carry my S&W model 60 357 magnum with the 3 inch barrel. Far more accurate than the Snubbies in my opinion.
 
I can carry my snubby, full size 9mm PX4 or full size 8045 Beretta Cougar with no problem. It all depends where you carry, I am 5' 10 and 175 and carry everything about 4:30 to 5:00, summer ro winter, even my wife never knows if I am carrying.
 
My dad had a snub nose Taurus ultra light in .38
Nice little gun. But it's for very close interaction. It's point n shoot. It's not very accurate.
 

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