One in the chamber? Or not!!


ishi

New member
My Makarov rides with one in the chamber, mag topped off, safety off. It's a long but smooth double action pull for the first shot, and that's plenty safety for me.

The Mak has passed drop tests where the pistol is dropped on the barrel exit from several feet up. The firing pin is safe not to go off in this situation, so I feel fine about carrying one in the chamber.

'Course, this is all said elsewhere. Please guys, don't jump all over Zig when/if she posts that she carries unchambered. Please see the 'brandishing' thread in the Law subsection.
 

Ektarr

Dedicated Infidel
I carry my guns as they were designed to be carried.

1911 A1 .45 cocked and locked.
Ek-chewally, I believe Professor Browning designed his Masterpiece to be carried safely in Condition 1: One up the pipe and the thumb safety off..."Cocked and unlocked". "Cocked & Locked" constitutes Condition 2 and is fine for those who desire that extra level of safety, but the grip safety is there for that very reason - to provide that last element of safety while being carried while allowing the sidearm to be drawn and fired in an instant without any further conscious removal of safeties in the process.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
When I first started carrying, I used to carry Mexican style without a round in the chamber, but also without the safety being on. When I began using holsters, I began carrying with a round in the chamber with the safety on. At all times I was aware of the pros and cons and I decided that it was best for me to carry in a holster (I use a SmartCarry in the summer and and OWB paddle holster in colder weather) with a round in the chamber.
 

GregRN

New member
I personally always carry with one in the chamber,....Besides,an unloaded gun is only good for a paper weight and you only have one chance to throw it at your attacker.:D

I agree. Not trying to defame or to be mean, but a rock would be better to carry, in my opinion, than an unchambered gun. The rock is cheaper, and the purpose would be the same (less loss from throwing the rock).

But to keep this constructive, find a gun you are comfortable carrying correctly. A lot of people think my Glock is unsafe carried at all, because they don't like Glocks. However, I am 100% comfortable with it. With all of the options out there, everyone should be able to find their comfortable weapon.
 

Tarzan1888

New member
I agree. Not trying to defame or to be mean, but a rock would be better to carry, in my opinion, than an unchambered gun. The rock is cheaper, and the purpose would be the same (less loss from throwing the rock).

But to keep this constructive, find a gun you are comfortable carrying correctly. A lot of people think my Glock is unsafe carried at all, because they don't like Glocks. However, I am 100% comfortable with it. With all of the options out there, everyone should be able to find their comfortable weapon.

Big + 1


Tarzan
 

Sgt. SIG

New member
Every police agency I know of and every top instructor teach carrying a LOADED weapon.

Good post GregRN!
 

burley

New member
Ek-chewally, I believe Professor Browning designed his Masterpiece to be carried safely in Condition 1: One up the pipe and the thumb safety off..."Cocked and unlocked". "Cocked & Locked" constitutes Condition 2 and is fine for those who desire that extra level of safety, but the grip safety is there for that very reason - to provide that last element of safety while being carried while allowing the sidearm to be drawn and fired in an instant without any further conscious removal of safeties in the process.

This is the way I learned 1911 condition carry levels;
Condition 0 - A round is in the chamber, hammer is cocked, and the safety is off.

Condition 1 - Also known as "cocked and locked," means a round is in the chamber, the hammer is cocked, and the manual thumb safety on the side of the frame is applied.

Condition 2 - A round is in the chamber and the hammer is down.

Condition 3 - The chamber is empty and hammer is down with a charged magazine in the gun.

Condition 4 - The chamber is empty, hammer is down and no magazine is in the gun.
 

slowfire

New member
Three different carry pistols, depending upon occassion. Full magazine, one in the chamber, safety on . . . yes, at the very beginning I did feel uneasy. After a time, you do realize and feel comfortable when you realize that the safety does do exactly what it was designed for. :D
 

automatic slim

New member
Unless you're carrying something used in the civil war, it is perfectly safe to carry one in the chamber. If you're seriously worried, carry something like a Para C6. It is DAO but in addition has a manual thumb safety.
 

xd40c

New member
I have to agree. An unloaded gun is as useful as any other hunk of metal that can be tossed at a BG. Regarding safeties, the last thing I want to happen in a crisis moment is to pull the trigger and here a click. So right now I'm carrying a M&P 40 C. One in the chamber and no safety worries. And none of my holsters have straps to be undone before the weapon can be drawn.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
I carry my Glock 23 with one in the chamber. When I first started carrying everyday, I bought a Taurus PT140 which had a thumb safety. Then I decided to get the glock with no thumb safetly as I just want to pull the trigger if I have to draw my weapon. I don't want to be messing with a safety or chambering a round. It was a little strange at first knowing there is no safety but I'm used to it now. I'm confident in my training that I will handle the gun properly at all times and have no problems.
 

DrDavidM

New member
I carry double action pistols and most don't even have safeties. My Taurus PT140pro does have a safety. I initially carried it with the safety on, but realized it was perfectly safe without it because it is double action only. I won't carry a single action because you must keep the safety on with them and I am not used to having to use the safety. There certainly is nothing wrong with keeping the safety on as long as you practice with it and learn to deactivate the safety as you draw the gun. Again, it is necessary to use a safety on single action only and there are certainly a lot of people that carry 1911's cocked and locked. I simply choose a double action so I don't have to risk a pull of the trigger with the safety still engaged.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
If I carry my Taurus, yes it will be on as that's how it was made to be carried. My Beretta Tomcat I carry cocked with the safety on. My Beretta 90-two I would carry off safety as the first pull will be long.
 

kwo51

New member
OK I agree but my really advanced friends call Glocks in condition 0. I like Glocks -1911-keltec train with all. Had to carry wheel gun at work. Is may brain confused? Pick one and stay with it. Clothing mandates type of carry.
 

Ektarr

Dedicated Infidel
This is the way I learned 1911 condition carry levels;
Condition 0 - A round is in the chamber, hammer is cocked, and the safety is off.

Condition 1 - Also known as "cocked and locked," means a round is in the chamber, the hammer is cocked, and the manual thumb safety on the side of the frame is applied.

Condition 2 - A round is in the chamber and the hammer is down.

Condition 3 - The chamber is empty and hammer is down with a charged magazine in the gun.

Condition 4 - The chamber is empty, hammer is down and no magazine is in the gun.

Je m'excuse. I had that wrong. In the limited opportunity I have to carry now, and when I was active and assigned responsibilies that had me carrying, I was always in condition 1. If I were out on the street, I would be inclined to carry Condition 0...cocked and unlocked...but would probably carry Condition 1 for that extra level of safety it affords and because - correctly or not - I have faith in my training to get UNlocked quickly enough when drawing that it wouldn't be a hindrance.
 

spc

Member
I certainly appreciate the pull of the O frame (1911) trigger over the double action trigger. I train to sweep the safety and it is automatic.

spc :)
 

Puppy

New member
I just don't see the problem people talk about with having to sweep the safety off with a 1911. Step 1. You pull from the holster and as you bring it up to aim you sweep the safety off. When your aim is on target you pull the trigger.

How the heck is that slower than a DA? Hopefully you aren't pulling the trigger while the gun is in the holster, or while it's being raised to the target.

I have three DA and one SA. In my opinion the SA is faster.
 

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