How Do You Feel About Notifying LEO That You're Carrying


Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
kimberscp45:219983 said:
You need to jump on line and revisit that. Nevada DOES in fact require that you notify them. They usually know when they pull you over.

Before I started carrying full time, I was asked a couple of times (at traffic stops) if I was carrying.

I've had my Nevada, Utah and Florida licenses for close to nine years now but really started carrying full time about 4-years ago; after my 84-year old next door neighbor was home invaded and a month or so later, an officer was shot in my backyard (his partner shot and killed the perp and the officer ended up fine after nearly dieing from a shot to the femoral artery).

If you've got nothing to hide, there's no reason not to tell them.

Only ten states require you to notify the officer. Washington is not one of those. Do you believe your 1st, 4th, and 5th amendment rights are as important as your 2nd?

I have nothing to hide and they have no right to ask me if I've been stopped for doing nothing illegal.
 

mrjam2jab

New member
You need to jump on line and revisit that. Nevada DOES in fact require that you notify them. They usually know when they pull you over.

Before I started carrying full time, I was asked a couple of times (at traffic stops) if I was carrying.

I've had my Nevada, Utah and Florida licenses for close to nine years now but really started carrying full time about 4-years ago; after my 84-year old next door neighbor was home invaded and a month or so later, an officer was shot in my backyard (his partner shot and killed the perp and the officer ended up fine after nearly dieing from a shot to the femoral artery).

If you've got nothing to hide, there's no reason not to tell them.

Only ten states require you to notify the officer. Washington is not one of those. Do you believe your 1st, 4th, and 5th amendment rights are as important as your 2nd?

I have nothing to hide and they have no right to ask me if I've been stopped for doing nothing illegal.


Neither is Nevada. :no:
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
The whole, if you have nothing to hide, then there is no reason to not tell them, started bugging me. Something seemed, all around, wrong with that statement. So I went online to search for stuff about privacy. I found a good article that I think anyone who thinks they have nothing to hide should read. The best responses I read though, would be these:

"I have nothing to hide...but I have nothing I want to show you [officer] either..."

"Do you own curtains?"

This is the article Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide' - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
It's a bit lengthy but it covers a lot.
 

Hoganbeg

Member
"This is the article Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide' - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
It's a bit lengthy but it covers a lot."

Wow! Great stuff here. I copied it to my hard drive so I can grok & cherish it in leisure.
 

Deanimator

New member
If you've got nothing to hide, there's no reason not to tell them.
REALLY?

So similarly, "if you've got nothing to hide, there's no reason not to":
  • Consent to a complete warrantless search of the car.
  • Consent to a complete warrantless search of your person.
  • Consent to a complete warrantless search of your home.
  • Consent to speak without benefit of counsel.

I GUARANTEE you that when Officer Harless of the Canton PD was informed that he was the subject of an IAD investigation, he didn't consent to ANYTHING.
 

NavyLCDR

New member

That
is the most ridiculous thing I have ever read on the internet

I have to disagree with you.

THR - View Single Post - CCW and Probable Cause To Search

If one of my officers ever came into possession of any firearm they'd be obligated to check to see if it was stolen - or they weren't doing their job properly, it's as simple as that. Yes, there are lazy cops who couldn't be bothered but I simply wouldn't put up with it. If I found out that one of mine didn't check every weapon that they had their hands on out on the street, we'd be having a talk (the second time disciplinary action would follow if I found out about it...). A quick check of the serial number in my state, Florida, wouldn't provide any info about anything other than whether the gun was reported stolen. Whether the one in possession of a stolen weapon was going to jail depended on the circumstances. All of us (and this is more than fifteen years ago) were well aware that hits on stolen guns weren't always 100% reliable since a lot depends on what agency, or what individual, made the entry. Any way you look at it, a reported stolen weapon needs to be taken off of the street. That's the kind of police work we all should applaud, particularly honest gun owners

THR - View Single Post - CCW and Probable Cause To Search
I'm with Cane...Only a lazy cop would not run the serial number on a weapon or any other often stolen item like electronics that he has legitimately got in his hands.

THR - View Single Post - CCW and Probable Cause To Search
I will say that while I've never had a gun stolen. However, I hope that if I ever do that the cops are doing what I consider their job to recover it.

My reply:
THR - View Single Post - CCW and Probable Cause To Search

My television set was stolen. You won't have a problem if the police check the serial number of yours in your house, then, will you. The cops would just be "doing what I consider their job to recover it."
 

bootsdeal

New member
I've carried for over 50 years, with and without a CHL. I've only been traffic stopped a very few times in the 50 years, maybe 8 or 10 times at the most (the last was 2 weeks ago for minor speeding). I have never voluntarily told an officer that I was carrying, and never will. However, If I am asked, I will tell them honestly and produce CHL if needed. In my state it's not against the law to not inform the officer, unless he asks.
 

fudo

New member
I live in a must tell the LEO state. I have no problem with it. The times I have been stopped and informed the officer, he just ok and went about his duties. No problems, no further questions about it. Most officers realized the background check you go through to obtain the permit, so I think that takes a lot of the tension away. Being up front, respectful and friendly goes a long way too.

I also live in Oklahoma, My experience is the same as yours. Having said that, if I were a police officer I would assume that everyone is carrying and be appropriately cautious. So the requirement to notify is superfluous, in my opinion. I DO, however have a huge problem with police officers who take your weapon from you during an encounter. My gun is no threat to any officer and my desire to keep my weapon under my control and not surrender it to someone who is going to attempt to unload it out on the street is equal to his desire to go home at the end of his shift. For his safety he wants to take my weapon, but he wouldn't let me take his weapon for my safety.
 

localgirl

New member
Honestly, it depends on their attitude. Routine stop, I'm speeding or some other minor traffic infraction, if they aren't being rude, I am going to inform. If I were a cop, I would want to know. Not just for my safety, but for many reasons. Around here, it usually leads to chat about what you carry, when you got your permit, etc.

Then again, I was involved in an incident where someone hit my car and fled the scene, and the responding officer was friends with the driver, so he was a first class a-hole from the word go. Planned on telling him when he arrived at the scene, and promptly changed my mind.

Another time I was aiding in the search for a missing person, my husband was open carrying, and he and the deputies had a friendly conversation about what everyone was packing.

I don't have to inform in Idaho, but I will if I don't see a reason not to.
 
It's not required here in NY. I've been stopped a few times and have notified each time. I keep my ccw permit right next to my drivers license and hand them both to the officer. I say nothing about a gun. Each time I was thanked.
Seems to me that saying "I have a gun" or "I'm armed " is the wrong way to start off with a Leo.
Handing him a valid ccw permit lets him know you are authorized to carry and avoids any misinterpretation of the "I have a gun" statement.

This sounds like an excellent method to me. I have to imagine that in most jurisdictions, the officer will have been notified by their dispatcher if one of the owners of the vehicle has a CHL, so likely they'll already know. But as the Ohio tape proves, in some cases the notification from dispatch comes far later. A simple "here are my licenses", where one is your CHL, strikes me as a way to get the point across without making the officer immediately defensive by you using the word "gun" (or "firearm", "sidearm", whatever. My preferred term when speaking to law enforcement is "sidearm".)

I've never been pulled over while carrying, so I've never had to put it in practice. But my plan before was to politely notify, advising of the CHL first, then the weapon. "Officer, I am a Concealed Handgun Licensee, and I am currently carrying." Pause to give the officer time to process that and reply if they felt necessary. If no reply, then I would tell them where it is and offer to remove it or let them remove it. Now that I've read tag's idea, I'll go for that. A simple hand-over of the license with my driver's license, and that's it unless the officer brings it up.

As for "having to say violates 5th Amendment", well, since you're not doing anything illegal, it's not self-incrimination to insist that you inform, it's just obnoxious. :p (IANAL, of course. And glad to live in a "no notification required" state.) There are many other ways we can be "compelled" to provide non-incriminating information or be charged with obstruction or similar, I see this as no different. Obnoxious, unnecessary, but unfortunately legal.
 

DukeYukon

New member
Things are different where I live. The local police chief would probably throw me in jail if he found out I WAS NOT carrying.
 

Grognard Gunny

New member
I also live in Oklahoma, My experience is the same as yours. Having said that, if I were a police officer I would assume that everyone is carrying and be appropriately cautious. So the requirement to notify is superfluous, in my opinion. I DO, however have a huge problem with police officers who take your weapon from you during an encounter. My gun is no threat to any officer and my desire to keep my weapon under my control and not surrender it to someone who is going to attempt to unload it out on the street is equal to his desire to go home at the end of his shift. For his safety he wants to take my weapon, but he wouldn't let me take his weapon for my safety.

I have to agree with that. The incident I had with my "townie" trooper was reason enough to want to get the "Ya gots to tell 'em!" Law stricken from the books.

GG
 

mrjam2jab

New member
This sounds like an excellent method to me. I have to imagine that in most jurisdictions, the officer will have been notified by their dispatcher if one of the owners of the vehicle has a CHL, so likely they'll already know. But as the Ohio tape proves, in some cases the notification from dispatch comes far later. A simple "here are my licenses", where one is your CHL, strikes me as a way to get the point across without making the officer immediately defensive by you using the word "gun" (or "firearm", "sidearm", whatever. My preferred term when speaking to law enforcement is "sidearm".)

Bold: this practice should also be removed. Why do they need to be "warned" about a permit holder?
 

NavyLCDR

New member
Bold: this practice should also be removed. Why do they need to be "warned" about a permit holder?

Especially since there would be no evidence to suggest that the registered owner of the vehicle is even IN the vehicle at the time, let alone driving!
 
Bold: this practice should also be removed. Why do they need to be "warned" about a permit holder?

With any luck, officers will learn that this means that the driver is a generally responsible person who has passed a background check, and will treat the driver nicer than a random unknown... (Yeah, and if you believe that, I have a bridge to sell you.)
 

sszakacs

New member
I live in Ohio so it is a must inform for me. In Ohio when the Leo runs your plate it flags that you are a ccw holder so he already knows when he approaches the car that you could be leagaly carrying. Therefore if he should discover your gun it should not be a surprise to him. My biggest problem with must inform is that for me concealed means nobody is aware you have it. Therefore most of my friends don't even know I have a ccw or that I carry a gun. The one and only time I was stopped while carrying the Leo didn't seem to care in the slightest when I informed him but boy was my passenger shocked and surprised. It was quite a conversation afterwards and unfortunately now one more person who knows I have a ccw and carry. I guess if there was no warning to the Leo in advance I would be all for must inform but since they know before they even get out of the car then they should just assume you are carrying. To me all the must inform currently accomplishes is letting everyone in your car know and Like I said before in my opinion the more people that know you have a gun then the less it is concealed.
 

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