Have you had to draw or use your weapon and how has it changed you?


LGH

New member
Over the last few years I have had to draw my weapon a few times and had to use it 2 times. After all of the investigations and such. I look at using a little different than in the past. I also look differently at how I do things. Have others "been there" and did it cause them to look at things in a different light?
 

Over the last few years I have had to draw my weapon a few times and had to use it 2 times. After all of the investigations and such. I look at using a little different than in the past. I also look differently at how I do things.

I bet you do! Holy Smokes, where do you live? In 30 years, I've never even THOUGHT of pulling my weapon (and I grew up in East Baltimore). I trust, from the fact that you're posting (I'm assuming NOT from prison), that these were righteous shoots. If you'd care to talk about these situations, I'm fairly certain that others on this site would find your insights to be interesting and useful.
 
LGH is probably LEO or former LEO... I patrolled with a 15yr. veteran when I was on the force and in those 15 years, he has had to shoot on three different occasions. The first time he was being dragged by the suspects vehicle so he unloaded his pistol into him... 8 rounds later the perp was dead and deputy "Bill" though scuffed up, was alive! He said all three times he got sick to his stomach and vomited. Said it took him several days to get over the sick feeling!
 
No I was not a LEO I worked in private security and personal security. Was always given the best sites to work in nice "safe" areas to work. The two times I have had to use my weapon one was work related the other was not. The reason for my post is I have seen a lot of shoot first talk later post on here and it got me wondering if some have had the experience, ,pressure,and/or fear in a shoot no shoot.
 
To me, the most important gun part is between your ears..
If you can deescalate a situation using your mind, words and body language and not have to pull, then that is a successful encounter..
It is also what is between your ears that makes you hit your target when you shoot, correct.. Training for your brain from going to the range, reading about and thinking about scenarios, and training you mind in what to do, and what not to do...
Hopefully if or when the time comes, and the situation can not be avoided, you will pull, shoot, not shoot a bystander, have witnesses on your side, have your permit (if required) on you, and a reasonable police officer arrive afterwords..

I have never needed to pull, and hope I never have to.. I prepare everyday in my mind and it is one of the reasons I frequent this site..

So LGH, if you would, expound upon your encounters so that we can all improve what is between our ears so what may come out the end of our barrels be true and accurate!!!
 
Ok first time I had to shoot was when I was working a protection detail. Man steps from doorway begins firing.
Second, a man had broken into my home, I walk in on him. He pulls a knife I tell him to leave there is not need for the knife. I says he is going to kill me and rape my wife as I die. That is the short and the sweet of it. Both times they were good shoots. Both times I had lawyers trying to sue me for everything I own. Both times I have reviewed what happened millisons of times looking for a diffrent ending.
 
I've had my permit 4 years this month and thankfully I've never had to draw or use any of my guns. Hopefully it'll remain that way.
 
I hear that

Ok first time I had to shoot was when I was working a protection detail. Man steps from doorway begins firing.
Second, a man had broken into my home, I walk in on him. He pulls a knife I tell him to leave there is not need for the knife. I says he is going to kill me and rape my wife as I die. That is the short and the sweet of it. Both times they were good shoots. Both times I had lawyers trying to sue me for everything I own. Both times I have reviewed what happened millisons of times looking for a diffrent ending.

I cant say i have had to draw or fire but i do know that after my child was born 9 months ago, i started buying guns and some of my family/ friends look at me different but i will say that coming to this site has given me ideas and good arguments to counter just about anything anybody wants to say against me or guns.

IN your situations i would have done the exact same thing and i really DO NOT think i would feel to bad about it, i mean im sure afterwards i would feel a little funny, and im not some crazy hardcore guy really i mean im one of the nicest people i think, but if someone crosses the line then thats on them and if moraly i feel that i was right then to h*** with them.
I know my closest family would be OK with it,(if it was self defense), I think some of my "IN-LAWS" and other family not as close would freak but hey you cant please everyone, i mean atleast your around for them to "disapprove" of. lol hahaha
 
Ok first time I had to shoot was when I was working a protection detail. Man steps from doorway begins firing.
Second, a man had broken into my home, I walk in on him. He pulls a knife I tell him to leave there is not need for the knife. I says he is going to kill me and rape my wife as I die. That is the short and the sweet of it. Both times they were good shoots. Both times I had lawyers trying to sue me for everything I own. Both times I have reviewed what happened millisons of times looking for a diffrent ending.

Wow! Both scenarios put you in a bad spot but from what you've said it sounds like any other ending would have only been a bad one.

The first one you just did your job and probably saved lives in the process. The second sounds like you gave the guy an out and when he didn't take it there really was only one thing left, protect your wife and yourself. I’ve always been taught that the perp has to have both intent and the ability to do you great bodily harm or death to use deadly force. In this case he’s told you his intent and with a knife had the ability.
 
Both times I have reviewed what happened millisons of times looking for a diffrent ending.

Well, my friend, from what you say, they sound like good shoots, alright. FWIW, I and others on this site, (as some have already indicated), would have done the same. You have walked the walk and righteously so, IMHO.
 
I've drawn a couple times on duty in beautiful Albuquerque. I don't think its changed me any, other than taking training more seriously, and learning the true effects of muscle memory (first time I drew my weapon I don't even remember reaching for it).

I think you discover a bit about yourself in these situations. My instinct was to attack the threat, and man I never knew I could scream so loud (Get on the expletive deleted ground!) I woke up that entire place.

When reflecting on it, its just natural. A threat to your life or someone Else's demands prompt action and if you've done your part (training, practicing) you'll spring into action and your brain will likely have to catch up with your body. I do think that having drawn several times it is a huge reinforcement that it is NOT something you ever want to do, after these occurrences i've always felt trembles in my hands, in my voice, etc (after suspect was under control/threat contained). I could only imagine the after effect in your body after you actually have to discharge.
 
I've drawn a couple times on duty in beautiful Albuquerque. I don't think its changed me any, other than taking training more seriously, and learning the true effects of muscle memory (first time I drew my weapon I don't even remember reaching for it).

I think you discover a bit about yourself in these situations. My instinct was to attack the threat, and man I never knew I could scream so loud (Get on the expletive deleted ground!) I woke up that entire place.

When reflecting on it, its just natural. A threat to your life or someone Else's demands prompt action and if you've done your part (training, practicing) you'll spring into action and your brain will likely have to catch up with your body. I do think that having drawn several times it is a huge reinforcement that it is NOT something you ever want to do, after these occurrences i've always felt trembles in my hands, in my voice, etc (after suspect was under control/threat contained). I could only imagine the after effect in your body after you actually have to discharge.

That trembling is the increased heart rate caused by massive amounts of adrenaline coursing through your veins. When put in a "Fight or Flight" situation your adrenal glands start pumping out the adrenaline in massive quantities!! Increased heart rate, sweating, etc..etc... Been there, done that:fie:
 
That trembling is the increased heart rate caused by massive amounts of adrenaline coursing through your veins. When put in a "Fight or Flight" situation your adrenal glands start pumping out the adrenaline in massive quantities!! Increased heart rate, sweating, etc..etc... Been there, done that:fie:

Now that I know a bit more about it (although can't articulate it perfectly) I also found that researchers credit a part of your brain that I can't pronounce working much faster than the logical part of your brain, and thats why in fights you see things slow motion...your brain is "seeing" whats happening and allowing your body to react, you just don't process fast enough to see it in normal speed vision. Your brain goes into "survival mode" and takes control.

All of the effects on the body caused by stressful situations are simply amazing. Thanks for the insight on the increased adrenaline production.
 
good question....

i was in security/law enforcement for 15 yrs and i have pulled my weapon twice on duty. i was working in east ft.worth. my partner and i stopped a vehicle to i.d. the driver when he took off in the car. he bumped my partner with the mirror. at the moment , i thought it was a little more serious than that. i pulled my weapon as he took off but did not fire as there was too many kids around. i ran to the other side with weapon in handand reached him just as he pulled into traffic. no shot. started shaking when i got back to my partner and she was laying on the ground. i can't print what she said , but i knew she would be ok. that is when i got the shakes.
the second time was , i don't know, more serious maybe. i got a domestic call and i took care of that and just as i was winding that up , there was a loud pop and then brick started flying simultaneously. i swear it was like a movie because everything SLOOOWED DOWN. i spun to my right, pulled my weapon . kids playing, parents visiting and then pandemonium. i start running and yelling for people to get down, because they were in danger and more important, i could not locate the shooter. i learned later that not one but 15 shots had been fired and by the grace of God, i was not hit. the first rounds had hit the bricks around neck high or so and less than a half inch from the back of my head.but a black male had been shot and killed half way down the street from my location.what did i learn? i will try to put in words.
1. be sure you are in the right relationship with THE LORD.
2.situational awareness is paramount.
3. officer fitness is of supreme importance, especially if you are wearing25-30 pounds of gear.
4. smooth draw is better than fast. speed will come.
5. most important take care of your partner...
there is more, like always be ready and practice, practice ,practice. then do it again. that is what i can put into words. the rest you just gotta learn.i haven't thought about those incidents in quite some time....
 
No I was not a LEO I worked in private security and personal security. Was always given the best sites to work in nice "safe" areas to work. The two times I have had to use my weapon one was work related the other was not. The reason for my post is I have seen a lot of shoot first talk later post on here and it got me wondering if some have had the experience, ,pressure,and/or fear in a shoot no shoot.

I have not seen any "shoot first, talk later" post's on here. Everyone on here seems to be "responsible" and know what they are talking about, keeping in mind that everyone has their own opinion's.
To answer your question: No, I have never had to draw a weapon yet. I couldn't tell you what would be going through my mind at the time either. Maybe if it ever did happen it'll sure as hell wake me up to know what the feeling is...not that I want to know......OR do I?? But if My/Family life is on the line I'd better be prepared to do what has to be done.
Good question.
 
In the military... I was an infantryman deployed three times. Training becomes natural reactions under fire, but the first time I was shot at I really didn't know what was going on for the first few seconds.
In civilian life I've drawn twice, never fired. Glad I didn't have to.
 
I've drawn three times, and probably could have gotten in trouble for the last one. I'll spare the details because I know what I did wrong. Mainly I acted out of emotion instead of sensibility. I don't really know how to describe the feeling, other than intense. I've never fired, thankfully.
 
Never had to draw or use it personally. When I was working security, I had to draw twice in 5 years. Went to a man-beating-his-wife call where he had busted her in the head with a maglite. When I got there she was in the living room and he cam out of the bedroom with a .22 rifle and said he was going to "kill the bitch".
He put it down after looking at the big hole in the end of my Glock .45.
Second time was at a motel where my partner and I arrested two guys with a kilo of cocaine.



.
 
Several years ago, another pickup truck pulled up beside mine on the highway. There were 2 men (early, mid 20s) in the truck, and it simply stayed beside me. The passenger was leaning out of his window, and looking at me intently. I slowed down, hoping they would just pass me, but they slowed down too. So I sped up, and they sped up and still stayed beside me. So at about 70 MPH, I just slammmed on my brakes. They couldn't react quickly enough, and they pulled ahead for brief period. But then they pulled into the right lane in front of me. I switched to left lane to try to pass, they pulled left and blocked me. Regardless of which lane I moved to, they blocked me, and began slowing down. At this point it seemed certain they were trying to force me to a stop. And the passenger alternately leaned out the window to look back at me, then lean back in and talk to the driver.

I was carrying my Taurus Model 66 .357 in the glove compartment, and reached over and got it out and layed it on the seat. When I looked back up the passenger had pulled his head back into the truck, and was gesturing excitedly to the driver, and they suddenly stepped on the gas and started pulling away. I was puzzled by this for a few seconds, then I realized that when I pulled the gun out of the glove compartment, I had (inadvertantly) lifted it above the dash, and made it plainly visible through the windsheild. They continued to pull away from me, and exited at the next exit.

I will never be sure exactly what their intent was, but feel sure it was a genuine threat. And as is often the case, simply demonstrating that I was armed was sufficient to end the threat.
 

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