Taurus PT140 Millennium Pro


Skunkbait

New member
I just bought a Taurus PT140 Millennium Pro for concealed carry. I've heard all the horror stories about these guns and will decide on its performance myself after I try it at the range so I'm not looking for info on the performance of the gun itself. Time will tell on that. I have a question on carrying with a round chambered.

I plan to carry it with a round in the chamber and the external safety on. I assume that everyone that owns one of these and carries it concealed does so in this manner. Does anyone have serious reservations or experience as to why this is not a good idea? To me, carrying loaded with the safety on is the only way to ensure I'm ready in the event I need to draw the pistol for self defense.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Skunkbait
 

I realize this doesn't actually answer your question, but it may help with some reassurance. I have the PT111 Mill Pro (9mm) -- 3rd generation -- and it has never failed in any respect...after about 600 rounds, it appears very reliable. It does seem to shoot a little low and right but that could be my lack of trigger control.

As for carrying with 1 on the chamber and the safety on...I have never actually carried it yet, so can't give first hand experience. But, that is how I plan to carry if I ever do carry it. I will suggest a lot of practice drawing and disengaging the safety so it becomes second nature.
 
I just bought a Taurus PT140 Millennium Pro for concealed carry. I've heard all the horror stories about these guns and will decide on its performance myself after I try it at the range so I'm not looking for info on the performance of the gun itself. Time will tell on that. I have a question on carrying with a round chambered.

I plan to carry it with a round in the chamber and the external safety on. I assume that everyone that owns one of these and carries it concealed does so in this manner. Does anyone have serious reservations or experience as to why this is not a good idea? To me, carrying loaded with the safety on is the only way to ensure I'm ready in the event I need to draw the pistol for self defense.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Skunkbait

This is what I carry and I carry with the safety on. When I train with it, I practice drawing it while flicking the thumb safety off to build muscle memory for this action. When it is holstered, the safety is on.
 
I carry a PT140 Pro 3rd gen with round chambered and safety on. I shoot at the club IDPA style each month. I practice flicking the safety off each time I draw to develop the muscle memory. No problems except with cheap ammo. Rounds that have a lip on the shell casing will sometimes hang on the magazine when feeding into the chamber. The gun is not as accurate as a Sig, or XD but at the range you would have to use it at, is sufficient to stop an attack. If you are going to compete then use a different gun. Mine tends to shoot low and left. I have learned to compensate.
 
I have both PT111 Pro & PT145 Pro and carry both. Very reliable, fun to practice with and can carry either one in a Kholster which is very comfortable after break-in. Vey happy with these guns.

Always one in the chamber and safety on. I do construction type work and am constantly bending, twisting, reaching, lifting, etc and never worry that my balls might be blown off at any second.
 
Taurus PT140 Millennium??? The manufacturer has a recall on all of those.

JUST KIDDING!

I had a Taurus for a lot of years. I thought it was a fine and reliable weapon.
I only carry with one in the pipe. That extra two seconds it takes to rack the slide is a lifetime in a SD incident - LITERALLY.

All firearms made in the last 5 years have either a safety block or firing pin disengage when the safety is on. Physically impossible to fire with the safety on. Of course, treat it as if it would fire for safety reasons.











.
 
Taurus PT-140 Safe Carry

I also carry my PT-140 with a round in the chamber. However, I do not like the idea of having it pointing down my pants with the striker cocked, wether the safety is on, or not. The pistol is in single trigger mode with the striker cocked at all times when a round has been chambered. In order to place the pistol in the safest possible condition, since it has no decocker, after chambering a round; 1. Carefully pull the slide back to the first resistance point. 2. Pull the trigger while holding the slide back at that point. 3. Ease the slide forward and you have decocked the weapon and placed the trigger in double action mode with the striker decocked. Practise this with your weapon unloaded, and only do it outside with the weapon pointed in a safe direction with live ammo just in case you blow it. The slide on this weapon does not require much more than 3/8" movement to the rear to cock the striker, but unlike Glocks, it's striker (firing pin), stays cocked after chambering a round, the Glock does not. This is why Glock calls their product a "safe action pistol". Carry Safe!!

:biggrin:
 
I have the 745 Millennium Pro C, very reliable, the only drawback is the long draw on the trigger. Iv'e been thinking of trading it in for another 1911 with a shorter barrel though.
 
Its what I have right now. No problems, no worries.

The Millennium line includes several innovative safety features including a positive firing pin block as well as the "Taurus Safety Latch", a transfer bar safety which prevents firing of the pistol unless the trigger is pulled. Together these safeties assure that the pistol will not fire if it is accidentally dropped; selected models have been certified as satisfying the California Drop safety requirement. All Millennium models also include a slide-mounted safety lever.[4]

Taurus Millennium series - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
I also carry my PT-140 with a round in the chamber. However, I do not like the idea of having it pointing down my pants with the striker cocked, wether the safety is on, or not. The pistol is in single trigger mode with the striker cocked at all times when a round has been chambered. In order to place the pistol in the safest possible condition, since it has no decocker, after chambering a round; 1. Carefully pull the slide back to the first resistance point. 2. Pull the trigger while holding the slide back at that point. 3. Ease the slide forward and you have decocked the weapon and placed the trigger in double action mode with the striker decocked. Practise this with your weapon unloaded, and only do it outside with the weapon pointed in a safe direction with live ammo just in case you blow it. The slide on this weapon does not require much more than 3/8" movement to the rear to cock the striker, but unlike Glocks, it's striker (firing pin), stays cocked after chambering a round, the Glock does not. This is why Glock calls their product a "safe action pistol". Carry Safe!!

:biggrin:

You saying only that "the striker is cocked at all times" without mentioning the firing pin block or transfer bar does a disservice to the saftey features of this gun imo.

Also, praciticing your 1, 2, and 3, sounds more dangerous than carrying it cocked and safetied in a holster.
 
I have the PT-111 Pro, I carry with one in the chamber and safty off. My other carry weapon is a SigPro 2022, it does not have a slide safty.
 
I carry one as well in a super tuck with one chambered and safety on. I did not always carry it cocked but it would take time to cock it that you may not have.
 
I carry one as well in a super tuck with one chambered and safety on. I did not always carry it cocked but it would take time to cock it that you may not have.

Takes two hands to cock it also (practically speaking) and so a second hand you might not have free if/when it is belt to belt combat.
 
Carry PT-111 Uncocked??

Wondering how you two get one in the chamber with the gun uncocked?? If you managed to do so you still have a double action trigger pull and it does not require "cocking" (ie. moving the slide again). Guns are not inherently dangerous, people are.
 
All MODERN DA an DA/SA pistols use transfer bars (there may be some foriegn made exceptions, so know your pistol). It is perfectly safe to carry with one in the chamber and the safety set to the fire position. Even dropping them while in this configuration will not discharge the weapon. Use your decocker if you have one and then place it back in the fire position.

Even modern revolvers use a transfer bar. You can tell by the hammer being flat. If the hammer has a firing pin on it, then know that it can discharge if dropped.

The most dangerous part of a Glock is the fact you must pull the trigger for disassembly. Make quadruple sure that the chamber is empty, and point it in a safe direction.

Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire and keep your finger off the trigger when holstering/reholstering.
 
All MODERN DA an DA/SA pistols use transfer bars (there may be some foriegn made exceptions, so know your pistol). It is perfectly safe to carry with one in the chamber and the safety set to the fire position. Even dropping them while in this configuration will not discharge the weapon. Use your decocker if you have one and then place it back in the fire position.

Even modern revolvers use a transfer bar. You can tell by the hammer being flat. If the hammer has a firing pin on it, then know that it can discharge if dropped.

The most dangerous part of a Glock is the fact you must pull the trigger for disassembly. Make quadruple sure that the chamber is empty, and point it in a safe direction.

Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire and keep your finger off the trigger when holstering/reholstering.

A cop, 31 years on the force, just shot himself in the leg this past week, pulling the trigger on his Glock to release the slide. Go figure.

I have to do the same thing on my XD but I lock it back first, then slowly release the slide forward as I pull the trigger. So, I know my XD is unloaded since it's locked back first. How is the Glock different?
 
You saying only that "the striker is cocked at all times" without mentioning the firing pin block or transfer bar does a disservice to the saftey features of this gun imo.

Also, praciticing your 1, 2, and 3, sounds more dangerous than carrying it cocked and safetied in a holster.

I have a PT140SS 3rd gen Millennium Pro. I have no qualms about carrying it with the striker cocked and the safety on (cocked and locked) but this guy's 1, 2, 3 would scare the crap out of me. It's really a bad idea. The Taurus has multiple safety features.
 
I've carried a PT145 3rd generation for three years now. Round chambered and safety on. Never a problem.

As for decocking one of these, there is NO safe way to decock a Millennium series pistol.
 
No safe way, and the "double action" mode isn't always adequate on these pistols to fire a round anyway. I had one for quite some time and figured out how to (unsafely) get it into DA mode on the first shot. It didn't always go bang.
 
A cop, 31 years on the force, just shot himself in the leg this past week, pulling the trigger on his Glock to release the slide. Go figure.

I have to do the same thing on my XD but I lock it back first, then slowly release the slide forward as I pull the trigger. So, I know my XD is unloaded since it's locked back first. How is the Glock different?

Which is why the Taurus MP (and others) have a safety feature which requires locking it open to remove the take down pin before pulling the trigger and releasing the slide.
Seems like it was made that way for people like your cop friend.
 

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