Single female new to firearms. Needs info :)


hannamaedru

New member
Hello. Thank you for reading this thread. I am looking for basic information on what and where to begin. I know nothing about firearms; besides the safety cautions of course.

I am a single 26 female living alone, and I have a past history of being assaulted, and I will NOT allow that to happen again. I am looking for a good at home protection gun, as well as I am looking into Concealed Carry Permits and small guns I could carry on my (I've seen holster that attach to a bra or running shorts)

Any information is considered great information, considering it will all be new knowledge for me :)

Thank you for your assistance on where I should begin.
 

maybejim

Maybejim
You should begin with a female friendly handgun course. There are a lot of good male instructors but there are some bad ones as well. If you have a friend with some guns, have them take you shooting. Go to a range where you can rent a variety of guns. Find a gun that you are first comfortable shooting and that you will be comfortable carrying. Then you can go after method of carry and expect to have to use several based on how you are dressed/where you are going at any given time. Try to find some females who have gone through the process. Don't let a guy talk you into a gun too big for you to comfortably carry or one too small to comfortably shoot. I'm a guy but those are my suggestions.

Here's a website that might give you some good ideas: Cornered Cat | If you have to fight, fight like a cornered cat.
 

alternety

New member
Look at Boberg for a concealed carry. Expensive but unexcelled in size vs projected power.

For the house; well rated handgun with large mag capacity. Night sights a plus. Get a small bright hand held LED light. Good for carry and for home. Laser - maybe yes/maybe no.

9mm is a good ammo choice for all uses. A good balance between recoil and stopping power. Boberg is particularly good at reducing felt recoil. Get good ammo in all cases.

There is also a women and guns section here on this site.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
Just about any gun club/gun range will offer basic firearms classes for free to the public, usually conducted by law enforcement or certified instructors. I took my daughter to a youth firearms class at my gun club that was free and excellent. Even including firing guns on the range to help take the mystery out of the things they were told not to touch without an adult present.
 

jameshd

CMFWIC
I'm gonna disagree with a lot of folks here and say don't have someone you know well teach you how to use a gun. Please finish reading this before you jump all over me. I know that if I was to teach my wife to shoot, I would not want to tell her she just did something completely ridiculous, and I doubt if anyone else would like to tell someone close that they did. You don't need to get a total stranger, but not someone close to you.

That being said, I did teach my grand-daughter how to shoot. However, she's a rarity - she actually listens to what people say and tries to follow the rules. That doesn't happen too often any more.

Of course, it's a two way street: The instructor doesn't want to hurt the pupil, and the pupil doesn't want to hurt the instructor. If the instructor is important enough to the student, the instructor can sometimes make a really boneheaded statement and the student will believe it as gospel. That's a good way to pick up bad habits. Best is to take more than one course with more than one instructor. You should also ask around about instructors; other students are a good source of information about them.

Another source of information is the internet. A problem there is that you can read something here, and then go immediately to somewhere else that says exactly the opposite. Best solution to that is to decide which follows common sense most closely.

And, above all else, continue to ASK QUESTIONS!
 
E

ezkl2230

Guest
Welcome to the forum. I'm going to tell you what I tell a lot of my customers: if you're looking for a good home defense firearm to begin with, and have little previous firearms experience, it's hard to go wrong with a good pump action shotgun. Using a handgun is all about shot placement; using one effectively and safely in a defensive situation requires a substantial amount of time at the range getting familiar with your firearm and developing your skills. The pump action shotgun, on the other hand, particularly when loaded with shotshells instead of slugs, requires far less precision to get the same job done, and the most instances the sound of racking a round in the chamber is enough to drive away a bad guy all by itself. There are any number of shotguns available that are already set up for tactical use, it's just a matter of finding the one that fits you the best. My personal favorite is the Remington 870 tactical with the Blackhawk! tactical stock in 20ga loaded with buckshot.
 

telpinaro

New member
Hello! Pretty much what everyone else is saying. Men can be great instructors, but they need experience teaching women since our build makes us quite a bit different. :) And it is easier having a professional teach you than a family member... you're less invested in them so it's a lot easier to hear criticism, especially when your family member (in my case, teaching me to drive a manual transmission) is trying REALLY REALLY hard to be patient.

Concealed carry is a hard one to give advice for... it's very personal. First you get to find a gun you like... hold them, shoot them (if you can - many ranges rent), research opinions and reviews online - though don't buy based solely on popular opinion, whatever you need to do. A lot of people will tell you to start with a .22... it's easiest to learn with, but then I started with .357 magnum. And had a blast. To each her own! Then you get to figure out how to carry it. I'm not properly endowed for bra carry, at least not with my guns (a Chiappa Rhino .357mag and M&P Shield 9mm), so I carry on my belt, inside the waistband. I've had to buy bigger shirts and some fun cover garments to accommodate. I've also got a thigh holster for dresses and a couple purses as backup.

Definitely get as much training as you possibly can. Besides being very good to know, it can be tons of fun.

It'll be an adventure! Have fun with it.

Also, update your state on your profile here... it'll help the rest of the forum people be more specific with legal stuff, ranges/classes in your area, etc.
 

N R A

New member
NRA Refuse To Be A Victim, is the first class you should take. The NRA instructor can suggest your next class.


Improve your personal safety strategies with NRA's Refuse To Be A Victim® Program. Experts agree that the single most important step toward ensuring your personal safety is making the decision to refuse to be a victim. That means that you must have an overall personal safety strategy in place before you need it.
Through a four-hour seminar (shorter presentations are available) called Refuse To Be A Victim®, you can learn the personal safety tips and techniques you need to avoid dangerous situations and avoid becoming a victim.
Hundreds of federal, state, and local law enforcement officials across the country have implemented Refuse To Be A Victim® into their crime prevention and community policing initiatives.
FAQ
Q: Is this a self-defense course?
A: It is a personal safety program that teaches strategies you can use to avoid situations where self-defense is required. This course focuses on proactive courses of action, rather than reactive. Criminals prefer easy targets. By making yourself more difficult to prey upon, you lessen your risk of criminal attack. That means having a personal safety strategy in place before you need it.
Q: Who can attend the seminars?
A: The Refuse To Be A Victim® seminar covers topics that pertain to both men and women. The information covered is appropriate for young adults to senior citizens. In addition, the Refuse To Be A Victim® program materials also include a special teaching module for parents which discusses tips for children ages pre-school to college. Women-only seminars are also available.
Q: Is there a fee, and what does it cover?
A: Seminar fees range in price, and are set by each individual instructor. The fees cover instructor time, and all materials distributed to seminar attendees, such as the Refuse To Be A Victim® Student's Handbook.
Q: How do I become an instructor?
A: Joining the Refuse To Be A Victim® instructor team is easy. Instructor candidates need to be at least 18 years old, have a clear criminal record, and complete an Instructor Development Workshop or the online instructor training course. You can then teach others how to better protect themselves, their families, friends, and their co-workers. Both men and women are encouraged to become instructors.
Q: Can I organize a "private" seminar?
A: Refuse To Be A Victim® seminars can be conducted for private corporations, businesses, and other groups and clubs. The flexible, comprehensive curriculum can be custom-tailored to fit your group's needs. For a list of instructors in your area, please contact a member of the Refuse To Be A Victim® staff.
Q: How do I find an instructor to conduct a seminar in my community?
A. Refuse To Be A Victim® staff maintains referral lists of certified instructors by state. If you would like to find an instructor near you, please contact the Refuse To Be A Victim® staff.
Q. How do I find a seminar?
A. Go to NRAInstructors.org - Portal for NRA certified Instructors, NRA Education and Training to locate all seminars. For listings, visit the Find A Course page, select Refuse To Be A Victim® Seminars from the Basic Courses list, and enter your state or zip code.
 

maybejim

Maybejim
Welcome to the forum. I'm going to tell you what I tell a lot of my customers: if you're looking for a good home defense firearm to begin with, and have little previous firearms experience, it's hard to go wrong with a good pump action shotgun. Using a handgun is all about shot placement; using one effectively and safely in a defensive situation requires a substantial amount of time at the range getting familiar with your firearm and developing your skills. The pump action shotgun, on the other hand, particularly when loaded with shotshells instead of slugs, requires far less precision to get the same job done, and the most instances the sound of racking a round in the chamber is enough to drive away a bad guy all by itself. There are any number of shotguns available that are already set up for tactical use, it's just a matter of finding the one that fits you the best. My personal favorite is the Remington 870 tactical with the Blackhawk! tactical stock in 20ga loaded with buckshot.

I have to disagree a little. A shotgun generally is considered a good home defense weapon. But it is long and awkward to move with. Yeah, I know you hear a bump in the night you're supposed to huddle in place and call the cops. But...that's not practical or what is going to happen most of the time. I personally haven't and wouldn't unless I was sure there was someone in the house that shouldn't be there. But everyone has to make that decision pretty much before you face the situation.

Secondarily you do have to aim a shotgun. While the shot pattern is bigger than a single bullet within the distances found within a home it is still pretty small. Here is the Box of Truth showing a max of 4 in spread at 12 feet probably close to maximum shooting distance inside a home. Some might be longer but most will be shorter. Link Removed
 

DanJ

New member
Welcome
My suggestions, First take your time in buying your first gun. Find a gun store that has a shooting range that you can rent guns that you might want to buy. Some gun ranges rent as well. The reason is after you shoot a gun several times you will get more comfortable with it. You will know if it is the gun for you or not. Find a gun store and staff that you feel comfortable with. The most common mistake made for the first time gun buyer is buying the wrong gun for you. Find what works for you. Find the gun that fits your hand. And, find the gun that you can easily work, use. Most will suggest that you buy a revolver because they are simple to work verses a semi automatic. That said you can learn to use and carry a semi-auto.
Possible handguns: revolvers, Ruger and Smith & Wesson make great .38 guns. Semi-autos, There is a long list but here are a few. Sig Sauer P238 or P938, Ruger LCP or LC9, Kahr PM9, Kimber Solo, Beretta Nano, Smith & Wesson M&P Shield, Springfield XDS 9. Find what works for you.
For the home I would suggest that you use a handgun unless you learn and practice how to use a shotgun or rifle (AR-15) in the home. Long guns can be harder to use in a home.

Here are some links of web sites that are run by ladies that can help you get started. Contact them, they will be glad to help.
1. Girls Guide to Guns

2. The Well Armed Woman

3. The Arms Guide | THE Place to Learn About Firearms in a Friendly Setting

4. NRA Woman’s Outlook is back! Visit Link Removed to see NRA’s new website geared toward female hunters, shooters and 2A supporters.

5. Cornered Cat | If you have to fight, fight like a cornered cat.
You can contact them through their site if you have questions.

Other site with good info.
NSSF | National Shooting Sports Foundation | Firearms Industry Trade Association
Practice, train and educate yourself and you will do fine. Hope this helps.
 

Peggy Reist

New member
Besides the Cornered Cat, this The Well Armed Woman is one of the best resources for education, different types of holsters and type of carry, and includes a lot of videos. Also before buying anything, whether guns, holsters, accessories, read all the online reviews that you can. You might save yourself a lot of money on something you THINK you want. If something has a lot of negative reviews, there's probably a reason. For instance, the Flashbang bra holster has a lot of mixed reviews. It seems to depend on whether you're busty or not if you'll get along with it.
And like several mentioned, if you can try guns (or holsters) before you buy, you'll be happier with what you end up with.
 

PopPop73068

New member
It appears most didn't comprehend what you are asking. You ae looking for a handgun, easily concealed, and learn how to use it. You also mentioned a bra holster. You would be referring to the FlashBang Bra Holster, which was designed and patented by Lisa Looper. Just type "FlashBang" in the search bar on FB, and it should list her FB page first. On it you will find contact info. I would recommend just giving her a call and she will ask some basic questions that men usually don't think of as we are built different. Based on your body size, type, frame, size of hand, etc, she can probably recommend a few different handguns for you to try out. Then go visit your local gun range, they usually have gun rentals available. Tell them which ones you would like to try, and they will get you on a firing line for you to test fire the hand guns. Now here is when you make your decision, based on how the gun fits your hand, your natural point of aim (the grips are slightly different angle, you you square up on the target, have the gun pointed towards the ground in front of you. bring the gun up in a two handed grip. if you are not aiming directly at the target, adjust your feet a tad. lower the weapon and bring it up again. continue making adjustments til when you bring the gun up, it is pointing at the target. now the tricky part. lower the gun, close your eyes and bring the weapon up aiming toward the target. then open your eyes. you have already adjusted your sideways aim point. now you look down the sights and are you pointing high, center, or low. the correct grip angle should have you on target, and you are then ready to try a few test shots with live ammo. i could recommend half a dozen handguns for you, and none of them be what you need or feel comfortable with. all i could do was give you a basic bit that may help you on making your decision. good luck, and welcome to the world of handguns!
Most of all the above references from the other posts are definitely worth taking a look at as well.
 

Warbirds

New member
Welcome to the world of internet opinions, be skeptical of everything you are told, you know what they say about opinions. Just remember safety first, whatever firearm you go with just remember there is no calling that bullet back once you pull that trigger. Like others have said, classes that are taught by or focused on women will get you on a good footing.

Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk
 

Caribou

New member
Find a gun that you like, one that fits you. Hire an instructor and ask him/her to bring a number of guns to try. You might also find a range with a ladies night. This will give you a chance to meet an instructor that has experience teaching women. Also women often feel more comfortable with other women than strange men.

The FlashBang looks like a good holster. Expect to wind up with a few holsters as time goes on. You will find a favorite after few tries. Different outfits will suggest a different holster.

Take a class or three to get started then at least one a year. I selected the 9MM due to ammo cost. Except for .22 the 9MM costs less per round than anything. I get to shoot more for less. I shoot cheap range ammo for practice. My carry ammo is high end hollow point or Hornady Critical Duty.
 

Jay

New member
www.corneredcat.com Excellent website, geared exclusively for ladies, administered by a lady who is a nationally known firearms instructor.

My standard response to your question...


This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.

Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Do NOT buy a handgun prior to a class. Reputable (ask for references) instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....

Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can consistently hit your target.

If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....
 

hannamaedru

New member
WOW!!!! I am so thankful today for all this information. You have all overwhelmed me with options to research! Thank you, this all means so much to me on this new unchartered journey!!

Now this may sound like a reeeeeedickulous question. But how does the size of the caliber work? Such as .38, .410, 9mm, etc. Is it the larger the number the larger the bullet, thus larger shot ?
Or does it change with each gun/bullet ?

Thank you again for all this kick ass information!! Keep it coming :)
 

apvbguy

New member
Hello. Thank you for reading this thread. I am looking for basic information on what and where to begin. I know nothing about firearms; besides the safety cautions of course.

I am a single 26 female living alone, and I have a past history of being assaulted, and I will NOT allow that to happen again. I am looking for a good at home protection gun, as well as I am looking into Concealed Carry Permits and small guns I could carry on my (I've seen holster that attach to a bra or running shorts)

Any information is considered great information, considering it will all be new knowledge for me :)

Thank you for your assistance on where I should begin.
visit Cornered Cat | If you have to fight, fight like a cornered cat.
 

Jay

New member
WOW!!!! I am so thankful today for all this information. You have all overwhelmed me with options to research! Thank you, this all means so much to me on this new unchartered journey!!

Now this may sound like a reeeeeedickulous question. But how does the size of the caliber work? Such as .38, .410, 9mm, etc. Is it the larger the number the larger the bullet, thus larger shot ?
Or does it change with each gun/bullet ?

Thank you again for all this kick ass information!! Keep it coming :)

Caliber is the diameter of the bore of the firearm, or the diameter of the bullet. Both diameters will be very close to being the same. As posted above, proper fundamentals will allow you to shoot the largest caliber you're comfortable, and proficient with. Do not buy based on caliber until your fundamentals skill set reflects proficiency. Start small and work up.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
Caliber is the diameter of the bore of the firearm, or the diameter of the bullet. Both diameters will be very close to being the same. As posted above, proper fundamentals will allow you to shoot the largest caliber you're comfortable, and proficient with. Do not buy based on caliber until your fundamentals skill set reflects proficiency. Start small and work up.

In addition - don't assume that you cannot shoot a higher caliber gun just because it is higher caliber and maybe "more powerful". The recoil will be different for each model of gun, even the same caliber, and the caliber itself will have different general characteristics. My wife, for example, finds that the recoil of her little .380 is more unpleasant than the recoil from my .45 that I carry.
 

maybejim

Maybejim
WOW!!!! I am so thankful today for all this information. You have all overwhelmed me with options to research! Thank you, this all means so much to me on this new unchartered journey!!

Now this may sound like a reeeeeedickulous question. But how does the size of the caliber work? Such as .38, .410, 9mm, etc. Is it the larger the number the larger the bullet, thus larger shot ?
Or does it change with each gun/bullet ?

Thank you again for all this kick ass information!! Keep it coming :)

It is confusing. .22, .223, .38, .357, .45 are the diameter size in inches sort of. The actual diameter of the bullet will vary slightly. 9mm, 7.62 (which comes in several size variations for different rifle sizes are the diameter of the bullet in millimeters. 10 gauge, 12 gauge, 16 gauge, 20 gauge are sizes of the barrel of a shotgun based on the number of lead balls that (one ball fits in the barrel) make up a pound. .410 is the bore size in inches (roughly) with the shell roughly the same size as a.45 Colt casing (probably longer). .38, .357, and 9mm are all bullets that are approximately the same diameter. As I said it is somewhat confusing.
 

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