Questions about carrying in Nevada and California


Alaska444

New member
The FUD in the post you quoted has been addressed before. Links have been provided wherein the parties involved have stated they will follow the law. People evidently choose not to believe the facts; I don't know why. Also, it's amazing how often these people post when a little time with the 'search' button would provide accurate info.

It's good to see another poster who values accurate information.

Dear NDS and NavyLT,

Perhaps you are completely unaware and ignorant of the fact that preemption did indeed do as you state EXCEPT for those aspects of local laws that were GRANDFATHERED into the preemption bill. Before you blast away in an uniformed manner that others resources input is BS, you may want to learn what laws in the LAS VEGAS area are grandfathered before you go and claim that preemption will protect you.

Nevada & Local Gun Laws

The following is a summary of State of Nevada and local gun laws, where applicable:
Pre-Emption

Nevada has a "Statewide Pre-emption" law, so counties and localities cannot pass gun laws that are more stringent than the state law. The NSRPA had a lot to do with getting this law passed in Nevada. Clark County (Las Vegas area) had some laws which pre-date the pre-emption (they were "grandfathered") and are still in place.

Clark County (minus Boulder City) requires registration of handguns only. All other counties have no registration of any guns. For Clark County, the first handgun purchase includes a 72 hour "cooling off" period. A handgun registration card (commonly known as a "blue card" because of its light blued color) is issued for each registered handgun, and must stay with the gun. Examples: If you take the gun to shoot at the range, you must take its blue card also. If you loan the gun to a friend, you must make sure he has the card with it. You may register your handgun at any branch of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (bring it to them UNLOADED AND IN A SAFE MANNER). If you sell or give away the handgun, you are obligated to have the registration transferred into the name of the new owner. If you wish to purchase other handguns, your "cooling off" period is waived if you have your blue card present.

Untitled Document

So, the only BS on this issue is yours it appears since 100% of what the LEO/INstructor taught us 2 months ago appears to be spot on. Thank you for the very interesting exchange.
 

Alaska444

New member
PERMITS FIREARMS REGISTRATION
Permits > Firearms Registration

PERMITS NAVIGATION
LICENSING INFORMATION
CONCEALED FIREARMS PERMIT
FIREARM REGISTRATION
SPECIAL EVENTS PERMIT
WORK CARDS
LAW ENFORCEMENT SAFETY
ACT OF 2004
NRS 244.364 Limited authority to regulate firearms; restrictions concerning registration of certain firearms in county whose population is 400,000 or more.

Except as otherwise provided by specific statute, the Legislature reserves for itself such rights and powers as are necessary to regulate the transfer, sale, purchase, possession, ownership, transportation, registration and licensing of firearms and ammunition in Nevada, and no county may infringe upon those rights and powers. As used in this subsection, "firearm" means any weapon from which a projectile is discharged by means of an explosive, spring, gas, air or other force.
A board of county commissioners may proscribe by ordinance or regulation the unsafe discharge of firearms.
If a board of county commissioners in a county whose population is 400,000 or more has required by ordinance or regulation adopted before June 13, 1989, the registration of a firearm capable of being concealed, the board of county commissioners shall amend such an ordinance or regulation to require:
A period of at least 60 days of residency in the county before registration of such a firearm is required.
A period of at least 72 hours for the registration of a pistol by a resident of the county upon transfer of title to the pistol to the resident by purchase, gift or any other transfer.
Except as otherwise provided in subsection 1, as used in this section:
"Firearm" means any device designed to be used as a weapon from which a projectile may be expelled through the barrel by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion.
"Firearm capable of being concealed" includes all firearms having a barrel less than 12 inches in length.
"Pistol" means a firearm capable of being concealed that is intended to be aimed and fired with one hand.
(Added to NRS by 1989, 652; A 2007, 1289)

Registration
Registration can be accomplished at any Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Substation and at any other law enforcement agency within the incorporated cities of Clark County. (North Las Vegas, Henderson, Overton, and Mesquite).

Registration is quick, simple, and easy. To register simply bring your handgun (unloaded) to any police substation. Submit your State Drivers License or State Identification Card. If you were born outside the United States and its territories, you must also provide either documented proof of U.S. citizenship or documented proof as a permanent resident immigrant. You will receive a cursory background check and given a gun registration card. It's that simple; and there is no registration fee. Please Note: The gun registration card is NOT a permit to carry a firearm concealed. Carrying a firearm concealed without a permit is unlawful and punishable as a felony.

The locations of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Substations and other law enforcement agencies within the incorporated cities of Clark County are listed below:

Link Removed
 

Alaska444

New member
Nevada & Local Gun Laws

The following is a summary of State of Nevada and local gun laws, where applicable:

Pre-Emption

Nevada has a "Statewide Pre-emption" law, so counties and localities cannot pass gun laws that are more stringent than the state law. The latest pre emption law was SB-92 of 2007. Stillwater Firearms Association worked with Senator John Lee and testified in support of SB-92 in 2007. Clark County (Las Vegas area) had some laws which pre-date the pre-emption (they were "grandfathered") and are still in place.

Shooting Outdoors

Generally, for any area not designated a "no shooting" or "congested area," shooting is allowed 1,000 yards from any dwelling or structure. (This may vary by county. Please check with your local sheriff). Your backstop and "down range" area must be secure from pedestrian, livestock, or vehicle traffic. Safety is of the greatest importance because of your individual responsibility to ensure public safety. You are responsible and liable for your actions.

Registration of Firearms

Clark County (minus Boulder City) requires registration of handguns only. All other counties have no registration of any guns. For Clark County, the first handgun purchase includes a 72 hour "cooling off" period. A handgun registration card (commonly known as a "blue card" because of its light blued color) is issued for each registered handgun. You may register your handgun at any branch of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (bring it to them UNLOADED AND IN A SAFE MANNER). If you sell or give away the handgun, you are obligated to have the registration transferred into the name of the new owner. If you wish to purchase other handguns, your "cooling off" period is waived if you have your blue card present.

Link Removed
 

Alaska444

New member
Las Vegas Concealed Handgun Laws in Casinos

Contributor
By Neal Litherland, eHow Contributing Writer


Concealed carry laws in Las Vegas.
When dealing with concealed firearms there are a lot of questions that have to be asked. The laws will vary by state and city, in addition to the local premise that you'll be carrying your firearm in. For instance, the laws for concealed carrying in a casino in Las Vegas may change from one casino to another.


Read more: Las Vegas Concealed Handgun Laws in Casinos | eHow.com Las Vegas Concealed Handgun Laws in Casinos | eHow.com
 

NDS

New member
Nice try.

We never mentioned those.

But don't let reality cause you a problem.

NLV and Boulder carry ordnances not grandfathered.

We'll give you a pretty little video to watch:
YouTube - Open Carry in North Las Vegas

Sorry buddy, no arrests. Like I told ya' -- the locals in NLV and Boulder caved.
One of the guys in the video owns this:
Link Removed
Another owns this:
Link Removed
Too bad they're so clueless, isn't it?
 

Alaska444

New member
Nevada Concealed Carry CCW Laws and Information

Right-To-Carry Law Type: Shall Issue. Nevada has an open carry law that permits a person to carry a handgun in plain view, however, there are exceptions. For instance, Clark County requires you to have a registration to open carry, and you must carry your registration with you when you are carrying a gun. Some cities such as North Las Vegas and Boulder City have "deadly weapon" laws, and you could be cited or arrested if you pass through their jurisdictions with a firearm in your vehicle. The make model and caliber of each firearm to be listed on the permit is also required. An individual may have up to 12 firearms on one permit.

Last Revised: March 23, 2010

Office of the Attorney General
100 N. Carson Street
Carson City, Nevada 89701-4717
Phone: (775)684-1100
Fax: (775) 684-1108
Email: [email protected]

Link Removed
 

Alaska444

New member
Nice try.

We never mentioned those.

But don't let reality cause you a problem.

NLV and Boulder carry ordnances not grandfathered.

We'll give you a pretty little video to watch:
YouTube - Open Carry in North Las Vegas

Sorry buddy, no arrests. Like I told ya' -- the locals in NLV and Boulder caved.
One of the guys in the video owns this:
Link Removed
Another owns this:
Link Removed
Too bad they're so clueless, isn't it?

Thank you once again, but so far you appear to be wrong once again:

Nevadans are free to don their arms in the open
Even though it’s legal, not everyone comfortable with gun-wearing citizens, especially some police

Local laws prohibit possession of guns in Clark County parks or in vehicles within North Las Vegas city limits.

Violation of the North Las Vegas “deadly weapons” ordinance, on the books since 1978, is a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The ordinance provides exceptions to the weapons ban as it pertains to “ordinary tools or equipment carried in good faith for uses of honest work, trade or business, or for the purpose of legitimate sport or recreation.” The ordinance has only been enforced in conjunction with traffic stops for other violations, such as speeding or suspicion of criminal activity, police say.

It also appears to violate the state law that gives the Legislature, not local governments, the power to regulate firearms, UNLV Boyd School of Law professor Thomas McAffee says.

“The state statute does permit some older local registration requirements, but the city ordinance here is a complete ban on possession in a motor vehicle, which seems to clearly fall within the scope of the state reservation of authority,” McAffee says.

Michael Davidson, North Las Vegas’ chief criminal attorney, said his interpretation is that the ordinance is legal because when the state law was last revised in 2007, the intent was to preserve pre-1989 local gun laws that had nothing to do with firearm registration. He said there have been dozens of cases in recent years where convictions that included violation of that ordinance have been upheld in North Las Vegas Municipal Court without a single appeal of the weapons ban made to District Court in Clark County.

“The intent was to go after gangbangers, not mom and pop in the RV,” Davidson says.

Farrell and other local open-carry advocates counter that North Las Vegas’ law is unconstitutional on its face, no matter the intent.

These advocates staged peaceful protests in North Las Vegas last year — picking up litter “to show we’re just regular guys” — and in January in front of Bally’s on the Strip, where numerous tourists had their pictures taken with Farrell and roughly 20 of his fellow gun-toters.

Nevadans are free to don their arms in the open - Wednesday, April 7, 2010 | 2 a.m. - Las Vegas Sun

GOOD LUCK fighting North Las Vegas. Perhaps you might want to talk to Mike Davidson above before you protest what appears to be upheld local laws despite the preemption. Thanks NDS and NavyLT for your advice but I will go with the LEO/Instructor at my CCW class. Thank you nevertheless.
 

Mountaingoat61

New member
Well my original question was basically if anyone had any information of FACT, please reply. There seems to be a lot of debate on interpretation of law so I really don't know much more than I did. So, I'll stick with my original plan of just keeping my gun in my vehicle, loaded and concealed in NV, unloaded, and locked up in CA. I don't plan on getting pulled over so I should be ok regardless. Thanks for all the input. :)
 

NDS

New member
This has been hashed and rehashed in the local press and NLV and Boulder caved. Officially, Boulder and NLV authorities have said they follow NV law. Yes, NLV has a 'driving with a deadly weapon law' that they really can't enforce. The DA drops charges if they can't follow the standard 'pile charges on and get a guilty plea' that LEO typically use. The fact is, NLV can't enforce their ordnance and they don't. Does that mean NLV cops don't illegally harass people? No way -- many cops across the country disregard the law as they please. In practice, it appears NLV LEO leave people legally carrying alone unless they have an issue with them -- then they add the 'driving with deadly weapon' BS on knowing it can't be enforced.

Also, since you brought up the blue card -- just within the last couple of months there's been a memo sent out that gun owners don't have to carry the "blue butt wipe" with them. I still do because I know cops routinely fail to read or disregard those instructions. There's no penalty for LEO when they show disdain for the public -- the DA sorts it out along with the judge.

Thank you once again, but so far you appear to be wrong once again:

Nevadans are free to don their arms in the open
Even though it’s legal, not everyone comfortable with gun-wearing citizens, especially some police

Local laws prohibit possession of guns in Clark County parks or in vehicles within North Las Vegas city limits.

Violation of the North Las Vegas “deadly weapons” ordinance, on the books since 1978, is a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The ordinance provides exceptions to the weapons ban as it pertains to “ordinary tools or equipment carried in good faith for uses of honest work, trade or business, or for the purpose of legitimate sport or recreation.” The ordinance has only been enforced in conjunction with traffic stops for other violations, such as speeding or suspicion of criminal activity, police say.

It also appears to violate the state law that gives the Legislature, not local governments, the power to regulate firearms, UNLV Boyd School of Law professor Thomas McAffee says.

“The state statute does permit some older local registration requirements, but the city ordinance here is a complete ban on possession in a motor vehicle, which seems to clearly fall within the scope of the state reservation of authority,” McAffee says.

Michael Davidson, North Las Vegas’ chief criminal attorney, said his interpretation is that the ordinance is legal because when the state law was last revised in 2007, the intent was to preserve pre-1989 local gun laws that had nothing to do with firearm registration. He said there have been dozens of cases in recent years where convictions that included violation of that ordinance have been upheld in North Las Vegas Municipal Court without a single appeal of the weapons ban made to District Court in Clark County.

“The intent was to go after gangbangers, not mom and pop in the RV,” Davidson says.

Farrell and other local open-carry advocates counter that North Las Vegas’ law is unconstitutional on its face, no matter the intent.

These advocates staged peaceful protests in North Las Vegas last year — picking up litter “to show we’re just regular guys” — and in January in front of Bally’s on the Strip, where numerous tourists had their pictures taken with Farrell and roughly 20 of his fellow gun-toters.

Nevadans are free to don their arms in the open - Wednesday, April 7, 2010 | 2 a.m. - Las Vegas Sun

GOOD LUCK fighting North Las Vegas. Perhaps you might want to talk to Mike Davidson above before you protest what appears to be upheld local laws despite the preemption. Thanks NDS and NavyLT for your advice but I will go with the LEO/Instructor at my CCW class. Thank you nevertheless.

And^that^ is one of the problems with our world. You have to have deep pockets to fight city hall. When NLV breaks the law the DA tries to make it look good for the city. Things are changing and the complaints here are becoming less common. But that's still a separate issue from the OP and the FUD. (Las Vegas Sun - not the best source for unbiased reporting, btw)

Again, this is a different discussion that what we started with. We started with what is the law and what should I do. The steps outlined in the OP would be fine. The other outdated BS is constantly brought up.
 

NDS

New member
Well my original question was basically if anyone had any information of FACT, please reply. There seems to be a lot of debate on interpretation of law so I really don't know much more than I did. So, I'll stick with my original plan of just keeping my gun in my vehicle, loaded and concealed in NV, unloaded, and locked up in CA. I don't plan on getting pulled over so I should be ok regardless. Thanks for all the input. :)

To get back to your OP. You are fine. Yes, NLV LEO have a history of abusing people and their rights, but that can happen anywhere. If you don't cause problems during a traffic stop you'll probably have no problems here either.

Sorry your thread got polluted with the usual FUD -- this has been discussed here and other fora before. The situation in Nevada is changing and many don't try to keep up but are happy to post old news.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
To get back to your OP. You are fine. Yes, NLV LEO have a history of abusing people and their rights, but that can happen anywhere. If you don't cause problems during a traffic stop you'll probably have no problems here either.

Sorry your thread got polluted with the usual FUD -- this has been discussed here and other fora before. The situation in Nevada is changing and many don't try to keep up but are happy to post old news.

I agree. Mountaingoat61, if it makes you feel more comfortable, print out a copy of the Nevada preemption statute. Nevada state law protects your right to carry your loaded firearm on your person or in your vehicle. The only portion of Clark County/North Las Vegas ordinance that was grandfathered by the state statute is the handgun registration portion, and that only applies to residents of Clark County AFTER 60 days of residency - so even the registration code does not apply to you.
 

Alaska444

New member
To get back to your OP. You are fine. Yes, NLV LEO have a history of abusing people and their rights, but that can happen anywhere. If you don't cause problems during a traffic stop you'll probably have no problems here either.

Sorry your thread got polluted with the usual FUD -- this has been discussed here and other fora before. The situation in Nevada is changing and many don't try to keep up but are happy to post old news.

It is very easy to make an accusation of FUD (FEAR, UNCERTAINTY and DOUBT) yet despite all of your many posts, you have not once shown anywhere that the grandfathered portions of the Preemption bill have been overturned. The simple fact remains that you could get into trouble in certain parts of Las Vegas despite the Preemption bill. If these are just "old news" (March and April of this year), then I would be very interested if you can actually cite a case where charges were dismissed based on Preemption. If Preemption over rules the grandfathered regulations then it should be a slam dunk for you to present a case where the state over turned a local arrest or better yet, over turned a conviction. I have searched specifically for such case and have yet to find anything of that sort. On the contrary, it appears that the Las Vegas folks still prosecute these laws.

In addition, the CCW course I went to in May is a well known course in Las Vegas, and several other websites list the grandfathered as current law. If my posts on this issue are truly FUD as you allege, then it should be quite easy for you to show actual legal cases proving that point. I have not been able to find any at this point. I will leave that task in your court if you really wish to settle the issue. But it appears the reason that this is unsettled is because there is no case taken to the Nevada Supreme court that I am aware of to settle the issue. There are times where conspiracies actually occur and there are times where doubt and uncertainty are caused by real doubt and uncertainty. The status of Las Vegas gun laws is such a case in point.
 

NDS

New member
It is very easy to make an accusation of FUD ...
Perhaps so. But I'm tired or these old canards about the terrors of Las Vegas being brought up every time somebody asks. The fact is you will probably not be proned out if you OC on the strip. You will probably be told to leave every establishment you enter and you will also be questioned multiple times by security and Police.

As for NLV -- a lot has changed in the last few years. The state pre-emption lists very little as not being nulllified by state law. That execreble blue-card is one. The NLV weapon in car ordnance is not. So far, nobody has taken it to court that I know of. I believe NLV is making sure it doesn't go to court because they know if will be overturned. Look at this quote from the article you cited:
“The intent was to go after gangbangers, not mom and pop in the RV,” Davidson says.
That is the kind of remark someone makes when they know they are on weak ground.

The fact is, you need no worry in NLV unless you're doing something that will draw great attention to yourself -- and that is true everywhere. Police can pile on bogus charges whenever they want. NLV and this unenforcable ordnance are the same. Find a case where somebody who was not doing something egregious went to court with this on their charge sheet. I can't find anybody who's made it to court with this at all.
... The status of Las Vegas gun laws is such a case in point...
That is an unfortunate fact. The California-lite folks and those who want to remain part of free America are duking it out in this schizophrenic state.

Whatever else, it seems the OP figured out he can come to NV without being assaulted by police at every turn. You have to go to Maricopa County for that!

I'm done with this thread -- and I'm still not worried about a gun in my car in NLV. Neither is the gun shop I buy from in NLV.
 

NDS

New member
Oh, before I go, the Arpaio remark above was a joke! I'm headed to Maricopa County tomorrow and expect I'll be fine.

So, heads up to AZ!:pleasantry:
 

Alaska444

New member
Perhaps so. But I'm tired or these old canards about the terrors of Las Vegas being brought up every time somebody asks. The fact is you will probably not be proned out if you OC on the strip. You will probably be told to leave every establishment you enter and you will also be questioned multiple times by security and Police.

As for NLV -- a lot has changed in the last few years. The state pre-emption lists very little as not being nulllified by state law. That execreble blue-card is one. The NLV weapon in car ordnance is not. So far, nobody has taken it to court that I know of. I believe NLV is making sure it doesn't go to court because they know if will be overturned. Look at this quote from the article you cited:

That is the kind of remark someone makes when they know they are on weak ground.

The fact is, you need no worry in NLV unless you're doing something that will draw great attention to yourself -- and that is true everywhere. Police can pile on bogus charges whenever they want. NLV and this unenforcable ordnance are the same. Find a case where somebody who was not doing something egregious went to court with this on their charge sheet. I can't find anybody who's made it to court with this at all.

That is an unfortunate fact. The California-lite folks and those who want to remain part of free America are duking it out in this schizophrenic state.

Whatever else, it seems the OP figured out he can come to NV without being assaulted by police at every turn. You have to go to Maricopa County for that!

I'm done with this thread -- and I'm still not worried about a gun in my car in NLV. Neither is the gun shop I buy from in NLV.


Thank you for an honest answer of the fact that the laws in Las Vegas have not all been over turned by the Preemption bill. You say you are done with this thread, so be it, but I am not quite yet done. My posts on this issue have been called BS and FUD by you and NavyLT when in reality you finally admit that I was not wrong. The simple fact that you don't like the state of affairs of Las Vegas does not justify the false accusation that my posts was FUD:

Fear, uncertainty and doubt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) is a tactic of rhetoric and fallacy used in sales, marketing, public relations,[1][2] politics and propaganda. FUD is generally a strategic attempt to influence public perception by disseminating negative and dubious/false information designed to undermine the credibility of their beliefs. An individual firm, for example, might use FUD to invite unfavorable opinions and speculation about a competitor's product; to increase the general estimation of switching costs among current customers; or to maintain leverage over a current business partner who could potentially become a rival.

FUD techniques may be crude and simple, as in claiming "I read a paper by a Harvard professor that shows you are wrong regarding subject XXX", but the paper does not exist. (Were the paper to exist then it would not be FUD but valid criticism.) Alternatively FUD may be very subtle, employing an indirect approach. Someone who employs FUD cannot generally back up their claims (i.e. "I don't recall which professor or which year the paper is from"). To dispel FUD, the easiest way is to ask for details and then provide well researched hard facts which disprove them. For instance, if it can be shown that no Harvard professor ever has written a paper on subject XXX, then the FUD is dispelled.

The term originated to describe disinformation tactics in the computer hardware industry and has since been used more broadly.[3] FUD is a manifestation of the appeal to fear.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear,_uncertainty_and_doubt

It now turns out that even though you accused me several times of disseminating false information and actually disinformation, you have now back tracked on that since you are unable to show that I spread false information. In fact, the Las Vegas laws do appear to continue have a grandfathered status and anyone that is going to carry concealed or open needs to pay attention to this simple fact until the day that Preemption is able to remove these laws. Until then, tread carefully in Las Vegas.

Lastly, I will categorically state that I have never once engaged in deliberate false information for the purpose of disseminating fear, doubt and uncertainty. I do not in any manner claim that I am all knowing or infallible, but you my friend have accused me falsely. For that I would be more than happy to accept your apology. Then I will be through with this thread as well.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
To sum up what the statutes actually state, as written, minus the personal opinion:

This North Las Vegas Ordinance:
9.32.080 - Deadly weapon prohibited in vehicle—Exceptions.

It is unlawful for any person to have in his possession in any automobile, truck, motorcycle, or any other type of vehicle any dangerous or deadly weapon, but this restriction shall not be deemed to prohibit the carrying of ordinary tools or equipment carried in good faith for uses of honest work, trade or business, or for the purpose of legitimate sport or recreation.

Is preempted, null, void and unenforceable in regards to firearms by this Nevada Statute:
NRS 268.418 Limited authority to regulate firearms; restrictions concerning registration of firearms in city in county whose population is 400,000 or more.

1. Except as otherwise provided by specific statute, the Legislature reserves for itself such rights and powers as are necessary to regulate the transfer, sale, purchase, possession, ownership, transportation, registration and licensing of firearms and ammunition in Nevada, and no city may infringe upon those rights and powers. As used in this subsection, “firearm” means any weapon from which a projectile is discharged by means of an explosive, spring, gas, air or other force.

2. The governing body of a city may proscribe by ordinance or regulation the unsafe discharge of firearms.

This North Las Vegas Ordinance:
9.36.100 - Registration.

A. Any person who has been a resident of the city for a period of sixty (60) days or more is required to register any pistols in their possession as set forth in Section B of this section.

B. Any resident receiving title to a pistol, whether by purchase, gift or any other transfer, shall within seventy-two (72) hours of receipt, personally appear at the police station, together with the pistol, for the purpose of registering the same with the chief of police. It shall be the duty of the chief of police to register the pistol and he may cooperate in any manner he sees fit with other law enforcement agencies in effecting registration of pistols to the end that efficient registration will be secured at a minimum cost and duplication.

Is grandfathered by the remainder of NRS 268.418, and remains in full force and effect:
3. If the governing body of a city in a county whose population is 400,000 or more has required by ordinance or regulation adopted before June 13, 1989, the registration of a firearm capable of being concealed, the governing body shall amend such an ordinance or regulation to require:
(a) A period of at least 60 days of residency in the city before registration of such a firearm is required.
(b) A period of at least 72 hours for the registration of a pistol by a resident of the city upon transfer of title to the pistol to the resident by purchase, gift or any other transfer.

It's right there in black and white. NRS 268.418 very specifically in unquestionable terms states exactly what the limit of the grandfather clause is. That limit is long-standing registration requirements. Nothing else is grandfathered. "Legislative intent" only applies when a statute is vague enough to leave doubt as to what the statute means; but, in this case, "no city may infringe upon those rights and powers" is not vague. It's plain, clear, cut and dried, ESPECIALLY given the paragraph following which specifically defines limits set upon what city governments are allowed to do (and regulating the transportation of firearms in vehicles is not within those limits defined).
 

Alaska444

New member
To sum up what the statutes actually state, as written, minus the personal opinion:

This North Las Vegas Ordinance:


Is preempted, null, void and unenforceable in regards to firearms by this Nevada Statute:


This North Las Vegas Ordinance:


Is grandfathered by the remainder of NRS 268.418, and remains in full force and effect:


It's right there in black and white. NRS 268.418 very specifically in unquestionable terms states exactly what the limit of the grandfather clause is. That limit is long-standing registration requirements. Nothing else is grandfathered. "Legislative intent" only applies when a statute is vague enough to leave doubt as to what the statute means; but, in this case, "no city may infringe upon those rights and powers" is not vague. It's plain, clear, cut and dried, ESPECIALLY given the paragraph following which specifically defines limits set upon what city governments are allowed to do (and regulating the transportation of firearms in vehicles is not within those limits defined).


Thank you for digging up that information. It looks like a lot of that has not translated down to the LEOs and other CCW sites in Las Vegas.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
The problem is that people need to put pressure on the cities and counties that have these illegal ordinances on their books to change them to come in line with Nevada Revised Statutes. We've been making steady progress in Washington State in this regard. The nullification of ex-Mayor Nickels gun ban in Seattle by the Washington courts have helped us immensely in this effort.

Here's an example:
Link Removed

And the result:
HeraldNet: County drops ban on guns in parks
 

Bohemian

New member
NRA Files Suit Over Preemption Violation in Nevada

NRA Files Suit Over Preemption Violation in Nevada


The National Rifle Association is backing a lawsuit filed against Clark County and the City of North Las Vegas in Nevada District Court. This lawsuit aims to defend the state’s firearms preemption law. NRA counsel filed suit on behalf of plaintiff David Hanes in the case Hanes v. Clark County and the City of North Las Vegas.
“The NRA is committed to defending firearms preemption laws in every state where they exist,” said Chris W. Cox, NRA chief lobbyist. “Law-abiding gun owners shouldn’t be subjected to different laws when they cross city or county lines. Nevada's statewide preemption law was designed to prohibit this from occurring.”
Nevada originally passed a preemption law in 1989, meaning that counties and municipalities cannot pass gun laws that are more restrictive than the state law. Some gun ordinances in some parts of the state were “grandfathered” in at that time. However, in 2007, Senate Bill 92 amended the preemption law, removing all grandfathered ordinances with the exception of a handgun registration ordinance.
Unfortunately, to this day, the City of North Las Vegas has failed to fully comply with the amended law. Currently, despite the fact that it is perfectly legal to do so across the state, anyone transporting a firearm through North Las Vegas is in violation of a city ordinance and could face prosecution. David Hanes, a permit holder who frequently hunts and makes trips to the Clark County Shooting Park, is in violation every time he leaves the state-of-the-art, multi-million dollar shooting facility.
“It’s a shame that the City of North Las Vegas has failed to comply with state law and has put so many law-abiding gun owners in jeopardy of a citation just for exercising their Second Amendment rights,” concluded Cox. “The NRA will see this through to ensure that Nevada has a meaningful, statewide firearms preemption law.”
http://www.nraila.org/News/Read/NewsReleases.aspx?ID=14105

http://gonv.org/laws.htm



 

Midnight

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NRA Files Suit Over Preemption Violation in Nevada


The National Rifle Association is backing a lawsuit filed against Clark County and the City of North Las Vegas in Nevada District Court. This lawsuit aims to defend the state’s firearms preemption law. NRA counsel filed suit on behalf of plaintiff David Hanes in the case Hanes v. Clark County and the City of North Las Vegas.
“The NRA is committed to defending firearms preemption laws in every state where they exist,” said Chris W. Cox, NRA chief lobbyist. “Law-abiding gun owners shouldn’t be subjected to different laws when they cross city or county lines. Nevada's statewide preemption law was designed to prohibit this from occurring.”
Nevada originally passed a preemption law in 1989, meaning that counties and municipalities cannot pass gun laws that are more restrictive than the state law. Some gun ordinances in some parts of the state were “grandfathered” in at that time. However, in 2007, Senate Bill 92 amended the preemption law, removing all grandfathered ordinances with the exception of a handgun registration ordinance.
Unfortunately, to this day, the City of North Las Vegas has failed to fully comply with the amended law. Currently, despite the fact that it is perfectly legal to do so across the state, anyone transporting a firearm through North Las Vegas is in violation of a city ordinance and could face prosecution. David Hanes, a permit holder who frequently hunts and makes trips to the Clark County Shooting Park, is in violation every time he leaves the state-of-the-art, multi-million dollar shooting facility.
“It’s a shame that the City of North Las Vegas has failed to comply with state law and has put so many law-abiding gun owners in jeopardy of a citation just for exercising their Second Amendment rights,” concluded Cox. “The NRA will see this through to ensure that Nevada has a meaningful, statewide firearms preemption law.”
http://www.nraila.org/News/Read/NewsReleases.aspx?ID=14105

http://gonv.org/laws.htm




LOL

Silly backwards gun-grabbers.
 

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