New to CCW


BIGTUNA62

New member
Hello all from New Jersey. I am new to CCW and to handguns for that matter. I'll get right to it as I said I am a newbie and need help in the personal things I can do to help my accuracy. I bought a Glock 19 and am having problems and I mean problems I am all over the place. I am on the paper but low, high, left and right. Where do I start and what could I do on my own to get close. I want to do training but want to get my feet wet and somewhat efficient before I go and make a fool of myself. All help welcome and thank you in advance. I am glad to be a part of this forum and look forward in talking with you all. I have a lot to learn holsters, carry position, different tactics but, first things first and that’s being accurate.
 

Iam2Taz

New member
Not trying to be a SA.... Pay for lessons. Slow down. I'm going to bet you are shooting too fast. Two hands. Believe it or not, there are some very good u-tube videos on the subject. As you practice more you will notice that you are consistently in an area on the target. Once you get to that point you will figure out that it is in your grip or trigger finger. (There is a chart somewhere that I can't find right now.) It will help tell you were you are struggling.

Welcome to the forum.
Link Removed

Gun Sight Accuracy Chart
 

ack8910

New member
Check out this post (on USAcarry) by Daryl Dempsey. It's pretty good and may help some.

Twuble Shooting?

But definitely get some training. Professional is probably your best bet eventually (Gunsite, Front Sight, Thunder Ranch). Of course an NRA course would be great to start out with. Even going with a buddy who shoots will be helpful, as he/she will be able to provide some basic pointers. Good luck.
 

Purple

New member
I'm gonna saddle up with 'Iam2Taz' on his response - :). Sometimes you cant self correct your shooting problems and no amount of ammo or range time will help. The more frustrated you get, the more problems you create. If you can afford to pay for instruction, see if you cant find an experienced shooter to watch you and give some pointers. one sure fire way to eliminate flinching or problems with anticipating the round going off is to get a wheel gun and two to three rounds to the cylinder, give it a spin with your eyes closed, close the cylinder, sigh the gun/target and fire the gun double action. With the target linked by 'Iam2Tz' that will really tell you if your anticipating the shot. Do this several times and train yourself to relax while pulling the trigger and not worry about the round going off.
 

Providence Ranch

New member
As others have said, having an experienced shooter with you (paid or volunteer) will help. But practice on your own is good as well, as long as you don't just repeat the same drills expecting to "get better." Analyze each shot, and treat it like its the only one that counts. You probably already know what sight alignment and sight picture should be for your pistol, but if you don't, start there. You have to know what the perfect setup looks like first, then work on keeping it steady while you press the trigger rearward.

I can't speak highly enough of dry practice. That's "firing" an empty gun. Check your owners manual to make sure it won't damage the guts. Most modern models are fine to dry practice with. Otherwise, use snap caps. Get them at Cabelas, Bass Pro, and gun shops everywhere.

Dry practice is cheap, fun, and convenient. You can do it in your living room! Just make sure you remove all live ammo from the room (im not kidding), double and triple check your chamber, cylinder, mag well, etc, to ensure they are empty (im still not kidding), and then pick a certain spot to aim at that will be least likely to allow a bullet to harm anyone. Just to be safe. Still totally not kidding.

While you're dry practicing, watch the sight picture and try to keep it from moving as you press the trigger through the breaking point. Watch the front sight. If it moves at the break, that's the direction your round would likely have gone if you'd been firing live rounds. Keep practicing until you can keep it steady all the way through.

When you live fire, remember your dry practice drills. Start at 5 or 7 yards if you can. Concentrate on each individual shot, and let the shot actually surprise you a little. If you start to scatter your shots again, unload your gun, right there at the range, and dry practice 5 or 10 times. Then reload and shoot live again. You'll be amazed. Good luck, and be safe!
 

HootmonSccy

New member
Any chance you ride motorcycles (or have in the past??) Just wondering??
Watch videos, read articles, get a lesson or two from an NRA trainer..
 

pmb61

New member
HOLD IT!!! I'm still trying to get over the first sentence where you state you are in New Jersey and have a CCW????????
 

jtg452

Member
Move the targets in to about 12 FEET. Folks argue about shooting this close but there's reason to the madness. The farther away the target is, the more mistakes are amplified. What may move bullet impact 1 inch at 12 feet could put it off the paper at 25 yards. If you don't know what you are doing wrong, you can't fix it. It also builds confidence in the new shooter because they can SEE the results of very shot. Completely missing the target confuses and frustrates because you don't know what you did wrong.

Shoot slow, deliberate groups concentrating on proper form (stance, foot placement,...), grip and trigger press. Focus on doing EVERYTHING the exact same way every time you shoot a round. Make sure you are HITTING the target the same place consistently. When you consistently keep every round in a group the size of the bottom of a Coke can, move the target back 3 feet and repeat the process. Keep moving the targets back when you're groups reach a certain size. If they start to grow, move it back closer. When you get out to about 20 yards, start the process over shooting one handed. when you get one hand shooting down, start over working with your off hand. By the time you are done, you'll be able to hit what you are aiming at with either hand and that's a very good skill to have in a self defense situation.

Once you have learned to shoot straight and you have the basics down (master grip, trigger press, ...) THEN you can work on getting self defense related stuff like drawing and firing and multi-shot rapid fire. If you are snatching, milking or otherwise screwing up your trigger pull, you aren't going to hit where you need to in a self defense situation. Also, if you don't get the same master grip every time you draw the gun, you won't hit the same place and your sights won't be aligned the same way when you point the gun. Get the gun sitting in your hand exactly how you need it to for the sights to be aligned. Hold that grip and holster. Once holstered, slowly undo each finger 1 by one and pay attention to how they feel when they are on the gun. I look for certain tactile points like how the middle joint of my middle finger feels when it is placed properly, how my wrist is angled, where my thumb falls on the gun, ... to learn how to get the right grip on the gun in the holster. Then practice drawing with your eyes closed. Draw, present the gun at eye or chin level and sights should be roughly aligned and fully visible when you open your eyes.

They are called 'fundamentals' for a reason. Getting the basics right makes it easier to learn the more complicated stuff like rapid fire and instinctive or point shooting. Poor trigger control or a misaligned, inconsistent grip on the gun will change the point of impact and if you don't hit what you need to, you are not only just making noise and wasting powder and shot but you are also sending real bullets down range that have to go someplace. I'd practice the draw by drawing and shooting 1 shot onto the target and holstering. When your first shot hits where you want it to EVERY time, go to shooting 2 rounds and reholstering. Once you can get multiple rounds on target quickly, go to multiple targets and progress the same way (draw, 1 shot on 1 target, 1 shot on the next target, holster). Focus on the FRONT SIGHT during rapid fire strings. Align the sights for the first shot and pull the trigger again when the front sight falls back onto where you want the bullet to go. The same holds true for multiple target strings. Your eyes move to the next target, then the gun. When the front sight hit the middle of the target (where you should be focusing your eyes), mash the trigger. Hold your aiming point a little low of dead center. Most folks miss high on multiple target strings, so aim a few inches or a hand's breadth low of dead center.
 

G50AE

Active member
I can't speak highly enough of dry practice. That's "firing" an empty gun. Check your owners manual to make sure it won't damage the guts. Most modern models are fine to dry practice with. Otherwise, use snap caps. Get them at Cabelas, Bass Pro, and gun shops everywhere.

Dry practice is cheap, fun, and convenient. You can do it in your living room! Just make sure you remove all live ammo from the room (im not kidding), double and triple check your chamber, cylinder, mag well, etc, to ensure they are empty (im still not kidding), and then pick a certain spot to aim at that will be least likely to allow a bullet to harm anyone. Just to be safe. Still totally not kidding.

While you're dry practicing, watch the sight picture and try to keep it from moving as you press the trigger through the breaking point. Watch the front sight. If it moves at the break, that's the direction your round would likely have gone if you'd been firing live rounds. Keep practicing until you can keep it steady all the way through.

Ditto. You might also want to practice the fundamentals of marksmanship with an airpistol. No recoil, and cheap ammo.
 

Tucker's Mom

New member
In the process of getting a Florida non res. and yes its absolutly impossible to get one here in New Jersey.
pmb61 is sharp and fast, eh? He must have caught that big tuna in 62 with a .22! j/k...ignore me: I don't exist.

Anyway, welcome to the club. This is the most informative group in town. You will learn a lot here....and argue with someone a lot too...in a good way. Don't forget to buy yourself a laser bore sighter.
 

swsd40

New member
Snap caps, someone who wont sugarcoat things to watch you, a pellet gun/.22, shadow practice (without the weapon in your hand), are afew things that have helped me. Welcome to the club, hope to see ya around. Have fun be safe.
 

SGTSKI

New member
There is alot of good feedback on this subject in this thread and forum in general. A few thoughts..
IMO, get the instruction and get it early. You dont need anything fancy, just a basic pistol course will do (firearm safety/ basic marksmanship principles) After you have established a base, you will be able to practice and teach yourself new techniques, without the "bad habits" that usually accompany "self-instruction." Plus the saftey training is invaluable, even to the most experienced shooter.
 

jcmille3

New member
I am also new to CCW and i have a question and was not sure where to put it. i live in nc and was wondering if i am on my way from work to a high school football game and do not have time to go home. is it ok for me to unload my gun before i get on school property and put it in my trunk or is that still illegal? it would really stink to have to go to work without it just because i was going to the game afterwards. i looked for any info on this on many websites and none of them address this. thanks for the help
 

BIGTUNA62

New member
Thanks for the help. I have another question and that is: I would like to practice at home as well as at the range. I cannot always get to the range so, what I am thinking of is getting a laser. This way I can see what I am doing by looking at the light as I pull the trigger. Great idea I think so but, lasers are $229 and up for something I am just using occasionally. I don't want it on the gun at all times. Now for the question is there any other alternative that would help me with what I want to do? I have seen bore sighting bullets and they are more reasonable at about $70 at cabelas. If I were to do the bore sighting bullet can you dry fire with it in the chamber without ruining the gun or the laser sight bullet? Thanks
 

BC1

,
Hello all from New Jersey. I am new to CCW and to handguns for that matter. I'll get right to it as I said I am a newbie and need help in the personal things I can do to help my accuracy. I bought a Glock 19 and am having problems and I mean problems I am all over the place. I am on the paper but low, high, left and right. Where do I start and what could I do on my own to get close. I want to do training but want to get my feet wet and somewhat efficient before I go and make a fool of myself. All help welcome and thank you in advance. I am glad to be a part of this forum and look forward in talking with you all. I have a lot to learn holsters, carry position, different tactics but, first things first and that’s being accurate.
In NJ I recommend you contact Anthony Colandro at Gun For Hire. They have several school locations throughout NJ. Great staff, knowledgable and fun place to learn.
 

walt629

New member
Hello all from New Jersey. I am new to CCW and to handguns for that matter. I'll get right to it as I said I am a newbie and need help in the personal things I can do to help my accuracy. I bought a Glock 19 and am having problems and I mean problems I am all over the place. I am on the paper but low, high, left and right. Where do I start and what could I do on my own to get close. I want to do training but want to get my feet wet and somewhat efficient before I go and make a fool of myself. All help welcome and thank you in advance. I am glad to be a part of this forum and look forward in talking with you all. I have a lot to learn holsters, carry position, different tactics but, first things first and that’s being accurate.

Try this web site.

Link Removed

It's all about Glocks from Glock expert competition shooters. The section on trigger control and stance is outstanding.

Typically getting the 'spray' pattern is a result of trigger control and grip issues. I had the same issue with a G33. I just could not get on target consistantly with that pistol.


Came to find it was a combination of a couple of things for me. First and foremost was the gun just did not fit my hand correctly. I didn't realize it until I spoke to a smith. I though there was aproblem with the mechanics of the gun. He took the time to put some other pistols in my hand until I found one I was comfortable. The one I ended up with has a natural point for my hand so I'm not 'forcing' the gun to go where I want it to. It just naturally points in the same direction my natural point goes.

Make a fist, hold it out in front of you so your wrist is completely comfortable, close your eyes and point your index finger out so that it is also comfortable. That is your natural point arm/wrist position.

Now do the same thing with your UNLOADED pistol. Pick a target and aim at it. Do you have that same comfortable feeling in the arm and wrist or are you contorting the grip and position to get on target?

You'll need a friend to help you with this one. Grip the pistol, close your eyes and just raise the pistol to the shooting position. Keeping your eyes closed, adjust your wrist until you gget that comfortable feeling. Your friend is there to make sure you don't change your wrist position when ou open your eyes. Now open your eyes and look at there you're aiming. Do you have a level weapon and are you looking down the length of the barrel?

If you're not comfortable with the grip and point (wrist and arm) you'll never be happy with the end result. IMHO (In my humble opinion) of course.

I've listened to the guys that tell me "you gotta learn to aim the gun" but in actuality they are telling you you have to let the gun aim you and that is a difficult thing to do. Changing your natural comfort is not the way to gain confidence with a firearm.

Check out the web site. You may find some tips to work with. Good luck and Welcome aboard!
 

walt629

New member
Thanks for the help. I have another question and that is: I would like to practice at home as well as at the range. I cannot always get to the range so, what I am thinking of is getting a laser. This way I can see what I am doing by looking at the light as I pull the trigger. Great idea I think so but, lasers are $229 and up for something I am just using occasionally. I don't want it on the gun at all times. Now for the question is there any other alternative that would help me with what I want to do? I have seen bore sighting bullets and they are more reasonable at about $70 at cabelas. If I were to do the bore sighting bullet can you dry fire with it in the chamber without ruining the gun or the laser sight bullet? Thanks

I have a bore sighting laser. Got it from Sportsmans Guide for around $40. It's the kind that fits inside the bore. You might try one of them.
 

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