A New CQB Study


5shot

New member
Force Science News: Transmission # 134 published Part 1 of a 2-part series dealing with a major new study dealing with close quarters armed encounters.

A key finding is that "those who win lethal assualts do so, in part, because they achieve target acquisition with their firearm in a way that is directly opposite of how most officers are trained."

The info goes on to explain that basically officers are trained to use their sights in the process of acquiring the target and shooting, while experienced police operators basically use Point Shooting which allows them to shoot more quickly and more accurately.

Below is a link to a digest that I made of Part 1 of the series. The full information will be added to the Force Science Research web site in the future.

You can request to be included in the e-mailings of the newsletter at Force Science® Institute, Ltd.

Here's the link to the digest
AIMED Point Shooting or P&S For Self Defense

.................

Just came across this Homeland Security info on responding to an active shooter situation. IMO, it should be made available to all schools.Link Removed

.................

Want to see some short videos of WW II fighters making fly-bys at our local airport? AIMED Point Shooting or P&S For Self Defense
 

Looks like a 'new study' with the same results.

Combat shooting is primarily snap/point shooting, especially when it's up close and personal. And it's almost always up close and personal.
 
Point shooting is a useful skill to have and it is faster and has roughly the same accuracy at close range (say, inside 10 yards) IF it is practiced regularly. My first shooting instructor was a retired special operations trooper that was a disciple of the originator of the 'Quick Kill' program that the Army used to teach. I've seen him shoot groups at 25 yards one handed from the hip that are better than most folks are capable of shooting using a two hand Weaver or Isosceles stance. Of course, he shoots about 1000 rounds a week of practice and has had 30 years of intense shooting and training to perfect his technique.

The biggest draw back I've found (he taught me the technique and I've worked on it privately since), is that it pretty much marries you to 1 gun. There aren't many guns, much less different models, that share the same balance and grip angle. You aim the gun like you are pointing your finger at the target (working on the premise that your finger where point where your eye is looking). Change guns and you're changing the relation of the bore to theoretical 'pointing' finger. You can learn to adapt to different guns, but it's basically shoot a shot and then adjust the gun to point closer to where you are looking based on where it hits.
 
The biggest draw back I've found (he taught me the technique and I've worked on it privately since), is that it pretty much marries you to 1 gun. There aren't many guns, much less different models, that share the same balance and grip angle. You aim the gun like you are pointing your finger at the target (working on the premise that your finger where point where your eye is looking). Change guns and you're changing the relation of the bore to theoretical 'pointing' finger. You can learn to adapt to different guns, but it's basically shoot a shot and then adjust the gun to point closer to where you are looking based on where it hits.
That's why you practice regularly w/the different firearms that you have in your possession. You don't necessarily have to put 1,000rnds a week thru them, either. Well, unless you're looking to get as good as a SpecOps operator. Just practice regularly, be serious and be consistant with the stance/styles you shoot from. I suggest shooting once a week, if not go at least twice a month. I also recommend going w/a variety of stances and styles, particularly practice shooting w/your off-hand.

You never know what could force you to shoot Lefty if you're a Righty.

.
 
Just uploaded a short video to U-tube that discusses the 1911's slide stop pin problem - a fatal one for a 1911 user.

If someone plans to use a 1911 for self defense, he/she may wish to check it out.

The method of shooting that is shown in the short video is for close quarters use, and can be learned and maintained with little or no training.

Just use safe gun handling practices and common sense.

It provides the shooter not using a 1911 with an automatic and correct FSP and an automatic and correct Sight Picture. All he/she need do, is point-n-pull.

To use it with a 1911 or a gun like the 1911, the gun must be modified or it may jam on you, and at the worst possible time, which could be the best of times for the one tryinhg to kill you.

Here's the U-tube link:

YouTube - The 1911's slide stop pin - a fatal flaw?

.......................

A misc. item for those who like airplanes:

I also updated my page of WW II fighter pics and fly-by videos.

Here's the link: Pictures And Short Fly-by Videos of WW II Fighter Aircraft

And here are links to 2 nice group pics:

multione.jpg


multitwo.jpg


Hopefully, I will get some new videos and pics this weekend and others during this summer.
 

New Threads

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
49,538
Messages
611,233
Members
74,950
Latest member
gman8309
Back
Top