New guy here, Glock question


EdgeCrusher

New member
Good afternoon from the state of disarray, aka the people's republic of Massachusetts.

I've been CCWing for the past 2 years or so, having carried all manners of 1911s, snubnoses, subcompacts a 4" 686 in an IWB (yes, you read that right) until I decided to stop being different and bought a Gen3 Glock23. I'm not unfamiliar at all with it - before I was allowed to carry here in MA, I had owned a G17, 2nd Gen, so I get the breakdown, the carry protocol, etc.

The question I have revolves around magazines. I live in a restricted state, so "preban" terminology applies. I was given 2 13 round NDF UNotch "preban" magazines with the weapon - I had the same style mags on my G17 and when I left them loaded, the body cracked and the mag itself was useless, even with new springs. Those were all plastic, the G23 mags however appear to have metal inside them.....are these safe to leave loaded for long periods?
 

Eidolon

Alter Kocker
Good afternoon from the state of disarray, aka the people's republic of Massachusetts.

I've been CCWing for the past 2 years or so, having carried all manners of 1911s, snubnoses, subcompacts a 4" 686 in an IWB (yes, you read that right) until I decided to stop being different and bought a Gen3 Glock23. I'm not unfamiliar at all with it - before I was allowed to carry here in MA, I had owned a G17, 2nd Gen, so I get the breakdown, the carry protocol, etc.

The question I have revolves around magazines. I live in a restricted state, so "preban" terminology applies. I was given 2 13 round NDF UNotch "preban" magazines with the weapon - I had the same style mags on my G17 and when I left them loaded, the body cracked and the mag itself was useless, even with new springs. Those were all plastic, the G23 mags however appear to have metal inside them.....are these safe to leave loaded for long periods?

Who was the manufacturer?
 

Eidolon

Alter Kocker
These are factory original, Glock

There's more going on here then I suspect the magazines were defective to begin with you might want to contact Glock and see about replacements under warranty.

To answer your actual question you should be just fine to load your magazines to capacity and leave them like that
 

bofh

Banned
I had the same style mags on my G17 and when I left them loaded, the body cracked and the mag itself was useless, even with new springs. Those were all plastic, the G23 mags however appear to have metal inside them....

If I understand you right, you had a Glock 17 Gen 2 with plastic-only magazines that broke. Now, you have a Glock 23 Gen 3 with magazines that do have metal inside (and plastic on the outside). Right?

Are you sure those plastic-only magazines that broke were actual Glock-brand Glock magazines and not from a different manufacturer? I have seen plastic-only magazines for Glocks, but there were not made by Glock. I consider them unreliable junk. Glock-brand Glock magazines are metal+plastic. I always have one fully loaded standard capacity 15-round 9mm Glock-brand magazine in my Glock 19 and a fully loaded standard capacity 17-round 9mm Glock-brand magazine as a spare.
 

EdgeCrusher

New member
If I understand you right, you had a Glock 17 Gen 2 with plastic-only magazines that broke. Now, you have a Glock 23 Gen 3 with magazines that do have metal inside (and plastic on the outside). Right?

Are you sure those plastic-only magazines that broke were actual Glock-brand Glock magazines and not from a different manufacturer? I have seen plastic-only magazines for Glocks, but there were not made by Glock. I consider them unreliable junk. Glock-brand Glock magazines are metal+plastic. I always have one fully loaded standard capacity 15-round 9mm Glock-brand magazine in my Glock 19 and a fully loaded standard capacity 17-round 9mm Glock-brand magazine as a spare.

Thanks - the old Glock 17 mags were glock manufactured, had from my memory, no metal on the inside. The ones I have now are Non Drop Free, but appear to have metal on the inside. I don't mind the non drop free feature - Im used to slightly slower reloads with a revolver, I just want to ensure that the magazines will be consistent and reliable on the G23.
 

Anubis

New member
All of my Glock-made magazines have the metal lining and all fall freely out of the magazine well upon release. All of them function perfectly after being loaded to capacity for extended periods.
 

Rocketgeezer

New member
I don't know what you had, but I also don't think Glock ever made mags that were not metal lined, and they should drop free at all times loaded or unloaded and as long as they are kept out of the weather it will not hurt the mags leave them loaded for years, as a matter of fact I have had a G-23 for 8 or 9 years I have one of the original mags I got with the gun its been loaded since day one, I will shoot with it once or twice a year but it stays loaded. that's the only one I did that with so I guess it could be a test, but there have been no problems from it
 

BigSlick

New member
There are five types of Glock Magazines. The first ones were 9mm only since that was the first gun Glock made and didn't drop free. They weren't even marked as to the caliber. They had a baseplate without an internal retaining plate. The baseplate was held on by the side lugs only.

The second magazine Glock made was the transitional non-drop. It came into being with the introduction of the G22. Transitional mags have the caliber marked and a retaining plate inside. The baseplate has a hole through it so you can poke the retaining plate out of the way for disassembly. The transitional mags have three sides of metal on the interior and do not drop.

The third age of magazines are drop free. They have square slots on the top rear. The baseplate and retainer look the same as the transitional ones do but the part numbers are different. The forth magazine is the ten shot. Ten shot mags are all drop free. They use a different follower and mag spring than their hi-cap brothers but their retaining and baseplates are the same. 10 shot mags were made during the Assault Weapons Ban and for a while were very common. After the AWB expired hi-cap mags flooded the market.

The fifth magazine is an oddity. It's a hi-cap mag made during the time of 1994 to 2004 and was marked for Law Enforcement and Military use only. It was a drop free design and had the warning machined into the mold. If you weren't military or LEO it was a crime to own on of these mags.
 

EdgeCrusher

New member
I don't know what you had, but I also don't think Glock ever made mags that were not metal lined, and they should drop free at all times loaded or unloaded and as long as they are kept out of the weather it will not hurt the mags leave them loaded for years, as a matter of fact I have had a G-23 for 8 or 9 years I have one of the original mags I got with the gun its been loaded since day one, I will shoot with it once or twice a year but it stays loaded. that's the only one I did that with so I guess it could be a test, but there have been no problems from it

They were G17, 17 roung mags, U notches - I had them both loaded to capacity and at the time, it was my house gun - didn't yet have an all lawful purposes license (MA terminology). My G23 has the same U Notch, and when empty, they do not drop free from the magazine when the release is depressed.

Because of my experience with the old G17, I was a bit skittish to load them all the way and naturally, because I plan to carry this, I want to make sure I'm getting a reliable feed. I don't mind that the mag doesn't drop free but will eventually try to scare up some pre-ban drop free mags.
 

EdgeCrusher

New member
There are five types of Glock Magazines. The first ones were 9mm only since that was the first gun Glock made and didn't drop free. They weren't even marked as to the caliber. They had a baseplate without an internal retaining plate. The baseplate was held on by the side lugs only.

The second magazine Glock made was the transitional non-drop. It came into being with the introduction of the G22. Transitional mags have the caliber marked and a retaining plate inside. The baseplate has a hole through it so you can poke the retaining plate out of the way for disassembly. The transitional mags have three sides of metal on the interior and do not drop.

The third age of magazines are drop free. They have square slots on the top rear. The baseplate and retainer look the same as the transitional ones do but the part numbers are different. The forth magazine is the ten shot. Ten shot mags are all drop free. They use a different follower and mag spring than their hi-cap brothers but their retaining and baseplates are the same. 10 shot mags were made during the Assault Weapons Ban and for a while were very common. After the AWB expired hi-cap mags flooded the market.

The fifth magazine is an oddity. It's a hi-cap mag made during the time of 1994 to 2004 and was marked for Law Enforcement and Military use only. It was a drop free design and had the warning machined into the mold. If you weren't military or LEO it was a crime to own on of these mags.

I suspect then that my G23 magazines are the transitional non drop. Living in MA, it remains a crime to own anything LEO marked.
 

Stengun

New member
Howdy,

Sounds like you have some of the original Glock OEM 23 mags. The early G20, G21, G22 and G23 mags were metal lined and were non-drop free.

I have a 1993 G20 10mm and the mags that can with the gun and the ones I bought before the '94 ban are all Non-Drop Free mags and will NOT drop free no matter what you do. You have to lightly grip the mag a pull it free. The post ban mags WILL drop free with a push of the mag release button.

Since you can NOT legally own a 13rd mag you can either keep them for HD use, throw them away and get new 10rd Drop Free mags that are legal to own and send your old mags my way.

Back to your original question: Yes, you can fully load them and leave them that way for years. I have OEM Glock mags that have been loaded for years without any problems. I lost one of my 13rd G23 mags for two years ( left it in a heavy coat pocket that due to Global Warming I didn't need to wear for two winters in a row ) and after finding it it was still as good as new.

Paul
 

EdgeCrusher

New member
Howdy,

Sounds like you have some of the original Glock OEM 23 mags. The early G20, G21, G22 and G23 mags were metal lined and were non-drop free.

I have a 1993 G20 10mm and the mags that can with the gun and the ones I bought before the '94 ban are all Non-Drop Free mags and will NOT drop free no matter what you do. You have to lightly grip the mag a pull it free. The post ban mags WILL drop free with a push of the mag release button.

Since you can NOT legally own a 13rd mag you can either keep them for HD use, throw them away and get new 10rd Drop Free mags that are legal to own and send your old mags my way.

Back to your original question: Yes, you can fully load them and leave them that way for years. I have OEM Glock mags that have been loaded for years without any problems. I lost one of my 13rd G23 mags for two years ( left it in a heavy coat pocket that due to Global Warming I didn't need to wear for two winters in a row ) and after finding it it was still as good as new.

Paul

I can legally own/possess/use and even purchase pre-ban magazines, they're just at a huge premium here in the commonwealth. I took my G23 for a spin last night at the range after plowing some snow. It sits in my IWB now....going to seek out some more pre-bans in G23 and G22 so I have as many options as possible.
 

Eidolon

Alter Kocker
I can legally own/possess/use and even purchase pre-ban magazines, they're just at a huge premium here in the commonwealth. I took my G23 for a spin last night at the range after plowing some snow. It sits in my IWB now....going to seek out some more pre-bans in G23 and G22 so I have as many options as possible.

Can you purchase a "preban" out of state and bring it home?
 

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