Your ss #


sambo42xa

USA Carry Supporter
How many of you have a problem with writing down Your Social Security (SS) # when say filling out some sort of application whether it be a credit card that you're opening, form/s from work; first visit to a docotr, etc.?
I went to open a credit card at HomoDepot to get the 10% off deal when I was doing a home project. I didn't fill in the area for the SS, but the girl did ask me for it when I handed the form to her. She said I did not have to fill it out on the paper BUT I still had to give it to her verbally as she typed it out into the computer.
At work we are now having a random drug and alcohol testing starting the first of the year. One of the sample forms they showed us has an area for your SS. Me personally, do not want to put my SS in there. The way I see it is, Work already has it on file and I with me filling in another form with My # is just going to make it easier for someone to get ahold of it. I went throught this one time at work filling out a form. I left it empty and the manager asked me to fill it in. I told him I did not want to for it may get into the wrong hands. He tells me it is going to HR dept., which I replied, fine, they have My # on file already and I don't need to fill it in.....mail does get lost you know! In the end I had to fill it out :shout:.
Now, if there is a form I do not fill in My # and wait to see if I'm asked.
You may say "they" already have My # out there, but the way I see it is, the less I fill in My # from now on the less chances of it getting out there.
 

B

boyzoi

Guest
I dont give mine out.........I have a few credit cards, they asked I said no. I still got the cards.
If there was a card that said I had to I woudl reply, no I dont, and if that means you dont issue the card, then so be it. I also will not fill in my mothers maiden name. yes my SS # is out there, but like you I figure if I fill it in on one more form that just increases the odds of it getting out.:big_boss:
 
The more places you list it, the more chances of having it "borrowed". It's bad enough having been in the military and having it spread all over during that time.
 

HK4U

New member
I am old enough to remember on my origional card it said "Not for identification purposes". Now it is often required for that. Just goes to show you can not believe the government.
 

sambo42xa

USA Carry Supporter
Now I get an Insurance form to fill out for LTD (Long Term Dis.) from the Co. and it says on there...."you must fill in your complete name AND SS". If I leave out the SS I know the form will come back to me with a note saying I forgot to fill it out and also cause a problem if I refuse too. Unbelievable! Why can't the Co. HR dept. just go into my file and get it from there and fill it in themselves? Oh, because that's extra work for Them to do. Hmmm, fill it out myself, mail it back to Them and hope the mail does not get lost/OR in the wrong hands or leave that field blank and let Them fill it in.
I think I will take a chance and leave it blank.
 
Now I get an Insurance form to fill out for LTD (Long Term Dis.) from the Co. and it says on there...."you must fill in your complete name AND SS". If I leave out the SS I know the form will come back to me with a note saying I forgot to fill it out and also cause a problem if I refuse too. Unbelievable! Why can't the Co. HR dept. just go into my file and get it from there and fill it in themselves? Oh, because that's extra work for Them to do. Hmmm, fill it out myself, mail it back to Them and hope the mail does not get lost/OR in the wrong hands or leave that field blank and let Them fill it in.
I think I will take a chance and leave it blank.

You could wrie in the word "refused", "call applicant", or "on record with HR", etc. I imagine there's on "Privacy act of 1974" statement on the bottom of the document like most military documents. It would be nice if they told you why they need your ss# and what happens if you don't give it to them.



gf
 
Found some interesting info HERE:....

Link Removed

Personally, I no longer provide my SS# to non-governmental agencies.:fie:
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
I have always had a problem putting down my social security number, even more so since watching the movie, "Identity Theft: The Michelle Brown Story (which, by the way, was based on a true story)." Any time I can avoid it, I do. I do not want what happened to that woman to happen to me.
 

Scout

New member
I haven't had any problems "YET".

As long as you keep an eye on your credit report there should be no problems.

But again, that is just my opinion.
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
Your SS number is fairly easy to obtain even if you don't give it out.

I work at a state institution where we handle literally thousands of people's numbers a week - along with all sorts of personal information. Current and previous addresses, DOBs, and a decent amount of insight into what is basically their life story. We use normal computers and it's all fed into a ticketing system that isn't particularly secure. I doubt we're the exception. A dishonest person could make a tremendous amount of money (and probably do a tremendous amount of jail time) with the information that we have floating around.

Interestingly, when asked for their SS#, 99% of people blurt it out without thinking. Once in a while, someone is hesitant about it. On an extremely rare occasion (as in, maybe once a year for me), someone adamantly refuses - in which case it's impossible to assist them, because the system is built on using their SS#. We can look it up using only their name and DOB, but it's still based on that number anyway.

As far as I know, everyone who I work with are honest people - but you don't know that when calling your insurance company, hospital, or even the Social Security office.
 

magicman007

New member
There are ways to get every number associated with you. There are sights on ther internet that (for a fee) can get your credit report, SS#, phone #, current and ALL previous addresses, nearest relatives to you (along with their names, DOB, etc.), your DOB, your employment history, your height, weight, eye color.... pretty much everything one would need to build an identity around your life. If it's on a computer somewhere, it's NOT secure. No matter WHAT the company tells you. Just look at the CC info that was stolen in the past year. And those were from wel encrypted and (supposedly) highly secure companies/sites. If they want it, they'll get it. And they can work around not having your SS# to do much of what they want anyway.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
Up until three or four years ago, in Indiana, SSNs got printed on driver's licenses and ID cards unless you requested that they did not. I lost my wallet back in 2006 and did think much about it until I tried switching my phone service from Comcast to AT&T last year and discovered that someone had opened an AT&T account in my name. While I have taken steps to ensure that I do not lose my wallet again (such as purchasing a chain to attach my wallet to my belt loops), I can't help but feel that this policy was dumb. I'm glad it was done away with.
 

Sheldon

New member
Actually it is a violation of Federal law to require or even request your SS# as a requirement for any form not pertaining to the government.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
Actually it is a violation of Federal law to require or even request your SS# as a requirement for any form not pertaining to the government.

Can you cite the law that says this? I'd be interested in knowing that because I've seen numerous forms (job applications, applications for utility service, etc) that asked for the SSN that did not in any way pertain to the government. The next time I'm filling out something that asks for a SSN and does not pertain to the government, I'll simply show the applicable persons a copy of it.
 

magicman007

New member
Here's something I found from the Colorado AG's Office:

Requests by businesses

Federal law does not prohibit a merchant or other business from requesting your SSN. However, there is no state or federal law that requires you to provide your SSN to any entity not authorized by law to require it. Businesses, private agencies, etc. are free to request your SSN and use it for any purpose that does not violate state or federal law.

For example, retail stores, prospective landlords, prospective employers, utility companies, and other service providers often ask you your SSN, but they do not need to and you are not required to give it. They can do a credit check or ID their customers by alternative means. Remember that you are under no obligation to provide your SSN to any merchant or other business. However, that merchant or other business is free to decline your business if you refuse to disclose your SSN. Consider asking these questions:
Am I required by some law to provide my SSN?

Why do they need my SSN?

How will they use my SSN?

Will they share my SSN with other businesses or agencies?

What happens if I refuse to give them my SSN?

Are there alternative means of identification they will accept?


I found the same basic information on many other sites regarding SS #'s, but this was the first I found from a government site. Hope it helps.
 

DrLewall

Charter Member
I use a made up phone number and add 55 to the begining of it..when they come back to me and say that there is a problem, I just say, "I agree"..
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
Here's something I found from the Colorado AG's Office:

Requests by businesses

Federal law does not prohibit a merchant or other business from requesting your SSN. However, there is no state or federal law that requires you to provide your SSN to any entity not authorized by law to require it. Businesses, private agencies, etc. are free to request your SSN and use it for any purpose that does not violate state or federal law.

For example, retail stores, prospective landlords, prospective employers, utility companies, and other service providers often ask you your SSN, but they do not need to and you are not required to give it. They can do a credit check or ID their customers by alternative means. Remember that you are under no obligation to provide your SSN to any merchant or other business. However, that merchant or other business is free to decline your business if you refuse to disclose your SSN. Consider asking these questions:
Am I required by some law to provide my SSN?

Why do they need my SSN?

How will they use my SSN?

Will they share my SSN with other businesses or agencies?

What happens if I refuse to give them my SSN?

Are there alternative means of identification they will accept?


I found the same basic information on many other sites regarding SS #'s, but this was the first I found from a government site. Hope it helps.

Now I'm confused. First I see something that seems to suggest that if it's not government related, then I don't have to give it. Then I see something else that suggests that it can be asked for.
 

magicman007

New member
Basically, I think it means there is no law that says you HAVE to give it to a non government entity. But if you don't, the entity is free to refuse you service.
 

sambo42xa

USA Carry Supporter
From the start, I know IF someone wants it they're going to get it. MY main concern is trying to avoid giving it out (at work for forms, etc. when it is already on file!!) anymore the way things are now with people having more access to things etc. I'm still waiting like tattedupboy for an answer from Sheldon about the Federal Law.
 

Sheldon

New member
Can you cite the law that says this? I'd be interested in knowing that because I've seen numerous forms (job applications, applications for utility service, etc) that asked for the SSN that did not in any way pertain to the government. The next time I'm filling out something that asks for a SSN and does not pertain to the government, I'll simply show the applicable persons a copy of it.

I will try N find it, I on multiple occasions I have used the "You are in violation of federal law requesting" line only to be told to they did not need my SS# and were aware of the law forbidding. Your SS# is in fact federal property is only assigned to you, and in fact is treated as such by them. A state AG giving a opinion otherwise is out of their jurisdictions arena.
 

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