"Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know, I know"


I've got a couple of folks I work with who uses the title phrase quite often. It's most times when being informed that they are violating a simple, yet important firearm safety rule. Anyone else deal with this type of person? Any suggestions on fixing the "yeah, yeah, yeah...." attitude without putting the guy on the ground or simply firing him/her?



gf
 

Last edited:

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
Ask them if they know this so well, then why the hell are they continuing to do the wrong thing?

There comes a point in almost every type of thing (guns, cooking, driving, etc) where you've learned enough to know which rules are overly cautious and which are necessary, or which rules are in fact meant to link to other behaviors. On the other hand, after some more time, you realize that many of those rules are not overly cautious, but in fact make good sense.

Many people skirt rules simply because they see other people doing it. They don't want to put forth the effort, and quite frankly, it doesn't seem "cool". Deep down, everyone wants to fit in, and they don't want to be the only one demanding that people lock their slides back or put their ears on before going into the range.

Lead by example, and get as many others as possible to do the same. Don't slip up, not once - practice what you preach in every single instance. Most successful professionals of any kind have gotten where they are by not only practicing, but practicing good habits and form - whatever it is - shooting, weightlifting, bicycling, speaking, etc. There are exceptions, but those people (Mike Tyson) usually don't last long.

Basic rules exist for a reason - because it represents the most sustainable level of optimization available in a certain context. These have typically been developed, tried and tested by many who have come before, and they are rarely wrong (although amendments can occasionally be made).
 

HK4U

New member
Were they reacting to what you said or how you said it? It would be hard to know without being there. You have to approach different people in different ways. Some people take advice well others not so well and some have a know it all attitude and can not take it at all.
 

PascalFleischman

New member
I've got a couple of folks I work with who uses the title phrase quite often. It's most times when being informed that they are violating a simple, yet important firearm safety rule. Anyone else deal with this type of person? Any suggestions on fixing the "yeah, yeah, yeah...." attitude without putting the guy on the ground or simply firing him/her?



gf


Yeah, I busted the crap out of a guy at the range about a month ago. Dressed him down like you wouldn't believe. The dumbmule was turning to his buddy behind him, sweeping the entire shooting area with his (still loaded) Glock. I saw that and chewed his hind end out......people at the other end heard me through their ear protection. I've never seen the guy before, but when he pulled that stunt, I pulled no punches.
 

Scarecrow

New member
Yeah, I busted the crap out of a guy at the range about a month ago. Dressed him down like you wouldn't believe. The dumbmule was turning to his buddy behind him, sweeping the entire shooting area with his (still loaded) Glock. I saw that and chewed his hind end out......people at the other end heard me through their ear protection. I've never seen the guy before, but when he pulled that stunt, I pulled no punches.

good for you. gotta teach people to get rid of their bad habbits. I was teaching a friend to shoot one time with a rifle and when she had a question she would turn around and let the rifle follow her.. had to tell her real quick that is a big no no. luckily it was in her back yard so no one to put in harm's way.. but I let her know and see how dangerous that can be. she took it well and understood why I jumped on her so fast about it.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
If I got the "yea yea" from someone I was at the range with I would firmly insist whatever it was again and tell them if they wanted to do it their way then I would leave and never shoot with them again.

I haven't had tis problem with anyone I've brought to the range luckily. I'm a pretty laid back person but as soon as we walk onto the line I get very serious and go over the firearm rules and then show them how I expect them to handle the weapon (keep it downrange even when turning around, locking slide back when done firing, etc). My friends have seemed to notice the seriousnes of it and haven't had to really GET ON anyone.
 
When you say "firing" them I assume you own a range, if so, give them a warning. Since they would be responsible for ensuring visitor shooters are obeying safety rules they need to be examples. If they don't change their way, for safety and possibly legal sake, fire them.
 

Memphis

New member
You'll catch more flies with honey than vinigar. I'm with Luke on being extremely laid back but, when you step to that line or for that matter, simply pick up a firearm, then all that cool calm Memphis goes out the window. I may say something nice once and if I got a "yea yea yea" I would (nice but firmly) reinerate the subject. If it happens again my demeanor will not be kind and soft.

Everyone makes mistakes but, you can hardly afford any with a tool who's only safety is the human brain.
 

robiewan

New member
Yeah, Yeah, I know

If you have ever been on the receiving end of some idiot on a range, then you will be Very Alert every time you go to a range. Since I had some dumb woman shoot an arrow at a range, which missed by less than two feet when she missed her target, while half the people on the range were still picking up arrows, I take going to a range seriously. Did I dress her down? Dang straight I did! Walked out too.
Frankly gun ranges always make me nervous. I would rather be with a couple of close friends or family in the desert than on a range. Why? Because I know I can trust them, people on a range? I know nothing about them, and that is scary enough.
If someone comes back at you nonchalantly you have every right & reason to get ticked off and let the hills reverberate with your disdain. Maybe they will learn after a good solid dressing down. Who knows?
 
The major problem with these guys is leaving loaded guns on the bench while going down range. I calmly point out that they should put the guns away before going downrange, then I get the "yeah, yeah, yeah...." bit. Another problem is with this one kid that likes to play "quick draw", eject a loaded cartridge and catch it in the air. We (management) have discussed the situation, but cannot agree on a course of action. Your suggestions so far have been helpful. Thanks for the input.




gf
 
Many people worry about going to the range with me. I'm also laid back and quite a joking synical person normally. But, firearms are serious business. I applaud anyone to point out mistakes to me if I make them. I try extremely hard to make sure and follow ALL the rules.

It’s usually quite frustrating when I go to the range. I am very serious and disciplined at the line, but many others are not. I'm a college student and typically get the "I've been shooting since you were in diapers attitude from some older folks". That’s fine and everything, I only have as much shooting experience as I have, and others may have more.

However, laziness, negligence, and failure to follow safety on range is a serious offense in my mind. I caught a guy in the range parking lot one year showing a buddy how to do a "tactical" draw from his holster. He swept half of the cars on the road and half of us on the line while doing it. I went over to him to calmly ask that he do that either pointed down range, or off in one of the training stalls. I further go to find out that not only is he doing this with a magazine in place, but also a round chambered.

I might not be great in some instances while shooting or know all there is to know, but dang nabbit safety is important. He gave the "yeah, yeah" speech followed by telling me that he had been shooting since he was 5 and was perfectly knowledgeable in firearms safety. Obviously not from his actions. I don't care how much experience you have or how old or young you are. If you break the rules, you’re going to get an ear full from me. I expect the same back. And darn tootin I agree with previous comments. When a "Cease Fire" is called, you better unload your gun at your booth, stall, etc. Preferably keep the action open. Then you can go get your target. Plus, don't fiddle with your gun while the rest of us are down range, we don't want to get shot. I think with some "yeah, yeah" people it’s going to take a serious beating and/or something to put fear in them before they change easily.
 

PascalFleischman

New member
The major problem with these guys is leaving loaded guns on the bench while going down range. I calmly point out that they should put the guns away before going downrange, then I get the "yeah, yeah, yeah...." bit. Another problem is with this one kid that likes to play "quick draw", eject a loaded cartridge and catch it in the air. We (management) have discussed the situation, but cannot agree on a course of action. Your suggestions so far have been helpful. Thanks for the input.




gf

How about a rule of "NO TRICK SHOOTING"?

At the range I shoot at, they won't let anyone DRAW without having taken advanced training. Seems to me that shooting without any real-world application practice should be banned. He wants to trick shoot? Send him elsewhere until he decides that practicing is more important than impressing people.
 
Update on "Mr. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know, I know"

The guy was on the range after his work shift this evening practicing for a match this weekend. While supposedly "dry firing", the guy had a ND! He left his ammo and all but one magazine in the office before going into the range area to practice. We told him that he should leave all of his magazines and clear his firearm before heading into the range area. (All firearms are supposed to be cleared and cased prior to going into the range.) He pulled his "yeah, yeah, yeah....." thing and proceeded into the range with a magazine in his pocket and his firearm holstered in his competition rig. The guy tending to the range was cleaning the rental guns when he was stunned by the sound of the ND. The two management folks on duty went into the range area and told the guy to clear and bench his firearm.

Upon inspection of the firearm, I discovered that he used a file or some other abrasive device to alter the connector in his Glock. It's up to the GM on how he gets punished. As of right now, he's suspended for a week. I'm voting for him getting fired due to the breech in at least 3 range safety rules. On his way out the door he mentioned to another manager and myself "I'm usually very safe on the range." At this point we both couldn't help but to respond "Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know, I know", followed by "Mr. xxx, you're still suspended for a week."

Damn kid has got to learn sometime. I'm glad that he didn't hurt himself or someone else on the range.




gf
 

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