When to replace recoil springs?


waddy

New member
Is there a rule of thumb available to use for an indication of when to replace recoil springs. My practice has been interrupted lately and I have completely lost track of round count. Is there a generally accepted guideline or indicator for when it would be a good idea to replace the recoil spring. Gun specific would be a Kimber Pro Carry and full size Kimber. Thanks for any help offered.
 

FlashBack

New member
Is there a rule of thumb available to use for an indication of when to replace recoil springs. My practice has been interrupted lately and I have completely lost track of round count. Is there a generally accepted guideline or indicator for when it would be a good idea to replace the recoil spring. Gun specific would be a Kimber Pro Carry and full size Kimber. Thanks for any help offered.

Great question...Just purchased a Ruger SR40 this last Feb and was wondering the same thing...what are the telltale signs?
 

tuts40

New member
Would the manufacturer be available to answer that via email or telephone? I got lots of great help from Kahr Arms regarding such questions about a PM9 that way.
 

Lobo_79

New member
Great question...Just purchased a Ruger SR40 this last Feb and was wondering the same thing...what are the telltale signs?
A good question indeed...

One of the classic telltale signs is a failure to return to battery (FRTB). You've probably seen this before. This condition often occurs when the slide just doesn't have enough stored spring energy to strip the next round off the magazine and fully chamber the round. Sometimes just a slight tap on the back of the slide is all it takes to return the slide to the ready position.

It has been my experience that some guns are more sensitive to the recoil spring condition than others. For example my Kahr PM9 may experience a FRTB condition if I try to go beyond 1250 - 1500 rounds between spring changes. Since this is my carry gun I try to pay attention to preventative maintenance issues. On the other hand my Beretta 92FS will go over 5K rounds before I even begin to question the recoil spring. This is a range gun so I tend to push the intervals. My Kimber required a new recoil spring every 600 rounds regardless of what the OEM claimed.

When you're considering a periodic recoil spring I think it's wise to consider a magazine spring change too. This isn't always true but with my CZ collection it has proven to be a good practice especially with the heavier ammo (.40 S&W and .45 ACP) for example.

On credibility: I'm not a Gunsmith...I'm just an engineer who is big on preventative maintenance...LOL.
 

Purple

New member
I agree with Lobo_79. The recoil spring replacement sign can be the FTRB. But, there are other things that can do the same things as well like fouling, dirt, bad ammo, bent extractor. With all those problems eliminated and you still have a FTRB, then replace the recoil spring.

You can also try stretching the recoil spring, which will decompress and remove some of the memory on the spring. I have successfully done this on a S&W3913 I have, and have yet had to buy a new spring. :)
 

danielp

New member
Kimber's manual says 800 rounds in the Pro models. But a lot of springs are good until 2000. Just keep an eye out for wear and/or play it safe. New springs aren't too expensive. Just replace it and start your round count over.
 

FlashBack

New member
I'm sure I'm at or over the 1500 count by now...will be looking to pick up a couple to have around as it can't hurt to put in a new setup and have another at the ready.
Thanks for the comments!
G.
 

jhon

New member
Curious absence of comment on replacing recoil springs on Glocks...

;-)
..

I noticed that too. I have a g26 and a g19.. the 26 has just under 3000 rds thru it with the same recoil spring and the 19 has about 350 rds with the same coil spring.

I have heard on another forum that some have never changed out a spring with rd cnt in the 50-60,000.

With that said, I am sure there are other brands that go for awhile without replacing.

I had always wondered when certain springs should be changed and like earlier posts was never sure. I am inclined that if the recoil has not changed and the gun shoots without any issues, it should be good to go. But on the same said ( maybe a little paranoid ) a recoil spring generally are very cheap and pone can keep a couple fore each gun that one shoots and/or carry's on a regular basis.

note: also my understanding is that the lower the power? of the ammo, the longer one cn go with recoil replacing. The more powerful the load, the harder the recoil, the more of a chance the spring may needs to be replaced on a more regular basis.....
 
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