What would yyou do IF?

Sorry, I baited you into reading this...

I’ve read many threads of scenarios, and what would YOU do IF. I myself am guilty of perpetuating these threads. While it is a good concept to have some thought into what one might do in a particular situation, it is foolish to assume you would react in the exact same way, or even a moderately similar way to an actual encounter.
 

When I was a Police Officer, I learned, at least somewhat, to follow my gut. I noticed that everytime I was attacked by some nutcase, that I had this feeling in my gut that something just wasn't right. There was a feeling I'd get that said, he's lying, or he's nutso, or he's hiding something, or he's pretending to be nice. I started learning after several altercations or close calls, that I should try to secure the guy or create a little more distance, when I had that feeling. One of my favorites for writing a ticket was to have them stand in front of my patrol car, and I would stand on the side by the front tire. That way they had to come around or over the car to get me, allowing me a chance to react. (That is, if it was safe to do near traffic) I started putting bright lights in the rear window of their car, and going around behind my car and approaching their car on the passenger side. They were constantly looking at the drivers side, watching for me to approach. Most times I could stand there a few seconds without them knowing it, and look for a weapon in his hand, etc.
All that being said, doesn't prepare you for everything or everyone. It happens with anyone even though you're not a cop, that is if you tune in to it. If approached by someone you do not know, alarm bells should be going off immediately and you should be on guard, until you settle that situation. This day in time, people are raised, (or not raised at all) by parents who teach no respect or no regard. Life has little value to them, except for their own life. Your life is worth the 20 bucks in your wallet. Your life is worth the bragging rights in the gang, that they bumped somebody off. A cops life is worth whatever the badguy wants to get out of. They will kill you over a DWI, a minor arrest, or in some cases a traffic ticket. Many times when we approach someone, we don't know what skeletons they are hiding, but they think you know. How many cops have been killed because they pulled over a speeder, but didn't yet realize they had a known warrant for an attempted murder?
I just wish I would have had enough gut feeling to turn around and see that Pick Up Truck comming at 45 MPH that ran over me and gave me an early retirement.:biggrin:
 
Most of us know the color codes well. We know that we should never be in condition white unless locked safely in our homes. At the same time we need to give ourselves every tactical edge we can. i.e. carrying our firearm with a round chambered. It is a good idea to think about the different situations that can happen and plan out in your head what you would do if something does happen. When someone decides to attack you you four police officers in Washington over the weekend. Were they in condition yellow as they should have been or did they allow themselves to be lulled into a false sense of safety. Who knows. It is not for me to try and second guess what happened however it is a good example of what can happen in an instant and how bad it can go for the good guy. One thing for sure if you do not give your self as much of a tactical advantage as you can and stay out of condition white and you are attacked the only thing that may save you is an ineptness on the part of your attacker or the shear grace of God.
 
While not LE, I have, in the course of my life, witnessed a few violent episodes and also have been amazed how things went from 0-60 almost instanteously. I have described it as a cherry bomb - nothing, then boom!

Frankly, I don't believe there is much of a defense that the average citizen will be able to mount against an extreme, sudden attack. It is axiomatic that the first person to strike, suddenly and un-announced, whether with fists, feet, or a weapon, will almost invariably win. This is one of the reasons for a "kihap" or loud yell used in martial arts: to discombobulate an opponent, cause them to involuntarily blink and flinch. When they do, the attacker strikes. One good punch from someone who knows how and where to deliver one and its over before it even began. While someone more "extremely" trained (think special ops types) might recover to prevail, the average CCW permit holder will not.

This is one reason I'm concerned about CCW: too many people strap on a piece and think they're good to go - minimal handgun training, no defensive or tactical training, no hand-to-hand or edged-weapons training.

We're fooling ourselves.

I think the only answer is to develop and maintain a "warrior" attitude. Train, train, train...with your sidearm, with a knife, with your bare hands. Even then, if someone, who knows what they're doing, gets the jump on you, it's all probably moot.

My .02 cents
 
<snip>

I think the only answer is to develop and maintain a "warrior" attitude. Train, train, train...with your sidearm, with a knife, with your bare hands. Even then, if someone, who knows what they're doing, gets the jump on you, it's all probably moot.

My .02 cents

I had a guy in one of my karate classes. He was a big guy, prison guard, had been around the block a few times. He intimidated most of the people that he sparred with even though he was a really nice guy. He didn't intimidate one of the inmates and got sucker punched. It really affected his perception of himself and he dropped out of class because he was embarrassed. I remember talking with him and encouraging him to train more rather than less, but that was it for him.

The one thing you can be sure of whether it is your bare hands, a knife, or your sidearm...you will not rise to the occasion, you will fall to your level of training. (not sure who said that but I think it is a great quote).
 
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Where can I find out more about these?

If you're carrying and not aware of these, you are at a SEVERE disadvantage. If you google on "color codes of awareness", you'll find sites which will explain these to you. There are only a few and relatively easy to understand. Most of us could tell you what they are and explain them to you but it's more beneficial to you if you locate and read on them yourself. Go for it and let us know what you think.
 
I just wish I would have had enough gut feeling to turn around and see that Pick Up Truck comming at 45 MPH that ran over me and gave me an early retirement.:biggrin:

Damn......


JJFlash said:
This is one reason I'm concerned about CCW: too many people strap on a piece and think they're good to go - minimal handgun training, no defensive or tactical training, no hand-to-hand or edged-weapons training.


I completely agree. It is foolish to think that a firearm is the be-all-end-all device to ANY confrontation. Especially for those who get their permit, and carry without repetitive training to build muscle memory. I fear the fate of these people is to be attacked and not have the muscle memory to even draw their weapon. I don't think there should be any requirement by law or anything, but of common sense and an obligation to yourself to train.
 
Where can I find out more about these?

Code White

* You feel secure, whether or not you are actually safe.
* Awareness is switched off.
* You are unaware of your environment, its inhabitants, and their rituals of attack.
* All attackers look for victims in this state.

Code Yellow

* You are cautious. You should spend most of the time in this state.
* Awareness is switched on.
* State of threat awareness and relaxed alertness.
* You have a 360-degree peripheral awareness of such environmental danger spots as secluded doorways, entries, and alleys, as well as such psychological triggers as adrenal dump and attacker ruses. Be aware of people, vehicles, behind large objects, dark areas, etc.

Code Orange

* You are in danger. You are aware of a potential threat.
* State of threat evaluation.
* Specific alert. A possible target has been identified. A particular situation that has drawn your attention and could present a major problem. Someone may be giving oral indicators such as direct threats or using suspicious language. Focus on the potential attacker.
* Check to see if there is an avenue of escape, potential weapons available, and if others around you are friend or foe.
* Decision is made to take action.


Code Red


* You are in conflict.
* State of threat avoidance.
* Fight or flight. Flee, defend, or attack. You have evaluated the situation, and if there is a threat, you prepare to fight or run.
* Never stand or fight if there is a possibility of fleeing.
* Carry out decision to act made in Code Orange. You don't have to think; no indecision on the course of action; you are prepared.
* If use of physical self-defense techniques is necessary, use the level of force appropriate to the threat. E.g., don't treat someone who pushes you because he is rude like someone who is trying to stab you with a knife.

How to Use the Color Codes of Awareness

The color codes of awareness are a continuum of your awareness and readiness to defend. The objective is to constantly flow from one color to the next above or below, depending on the situation.

Never be in white. Spend most your time in yellow, even in places where you feel safe, such as at home.

Constantly be aware and alert, and shift from yellow and orange often as you notice potential threats and dangers. While walking down the street, practice imaginary shifts between the 2 colors. Practice thinking of ways to respond to potential attackers.

When in orange, notice what you can do to flee, defend, or attack if it becomes necessary, and make the decision to take a specific action if the situation escalates to red.

What would you do if that person walking behind you picks up the pace and makes a move toward you? What would you do if someone jumped out of the alley just ahead of you? What would you do if someone walking in front of you suddenly cuts your path and raises his hands toward you?
The Color Codes in Practice

Here's one example of how the Color Codes of awareness could be used. A 100-pound woman is walking to her car, carrying grocery bags. Being aware and alert in Code Yellow, she sees two suspicious men near her car.

She switches from Yellow to Orange. She decides on her self-defense options. They walk toward her and reach for her. She switches to Red, and executes her decisions: she throws the bags at them and runs back into the store.

Another example. You are walking and someone diagonally across the street stares at you for no apparent reason, with an angry expression. He doesn't avert his gaze. You shift to Orange and decide to run the opposite direction and yell for help.

He starts moving quickly toward you, crossing the street without regard to traffic. You immediately shift to Red, and without thinking or deciding, run the opposite direction at the fastest speed you can, and either lose him or run into a police officer or security guard that can help you.
Conclusion

Starting right now, be in Code Yellow. Throughout your day, identify potential areas of danger and switch to Code Orange as necessary. Switch back to Code Yellow if no threat exists. Do this exercise again tomorrow. And the next day. And so on. Eventually, awareness becomes a habit. Make the most important self-defense skill, awareness, a habit.

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You're too nice a guy, CST...the old college professor in me thought it best for him to look it up himself. Oh well...your way's probably better. He won't have any excuse now, for not knowing these. I'll give him a pop quiz later and find out.:biggrin:
 
It's ok, JJ. I read them here, and looked them up and read more about it, so I covered both ends. Another time through it and I should be ready for a quiz.

I always make myself aware of my surroundings and make sure I have a plan of action when I can forsee needing one, I just didn't associate it with anything other than my own thought process. The one difference is that I never thought about my awareness being off, especially at home. That's where the people I love are, and that's where I'm going to be more aware of something, wherever they are.
 
You're too nice a guy, CST...the old college professor in me thought it best for him to look it up himself. Oh well...your way's probably better. He won't have any excuse now, for not knowing these. I'll give him a pop quiz later and find out.:biggrin:

Too rough on us youngsters ;) lol
 
Here is some info on Jeff cooper who is usually given credit for coming up with the color codes. Before his death he wrote articles for many years for several gun magazines including Guns and Ammo as well as authoring a number of books.

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There are a few books reccomended from the site mentioned before. Do any of you guys with practical training and experience know anything about these books? I'm wondering if everything is covered in one of them, if there is one that should be avoided, or anything like that. I know that there's no such thing as too much training and information, I just want to make sure the information I'm getting is valid and practical.
 
I stay in Code Yellow! Not being paranoid, just serious situational awareness of my environment. While I don't go into towns at night and since live in country, I'm still Code Yellow. Always leave my self an out. Always park as close to front of a store as possible when I'm out during the day. Even going to the post office, I scan as I enter. Always stay away from large obstructions that could hide someone. Also, keep my distance from anyone wearing a hoodie (day workers around here wear them frequently in cool/cold weather) as well as anyone observed wearing clothing inappropriate for the weather. If there are people loitering around a convenience store, I come back later. Am always in Code Orange when entering a convenience store. At our place we have alarm systems that identify "position" of anyone coming in our driveway...they are sensitive and even identify barn cats... Since we are next to a US Highway...never know what or who may decide to come onto our place. Have had more than one person walk in (vehicle was supposedly disabled) on road who did not look "credible"...kept my sidearm visible with my hands on my hips and didn't let person get closer than 10 feet or so..."telegraphed" my message.

In our part of the country...probably 90% of the citizens have one or more guns either in their home, vehicle, and quite a few carry concealed. Our Sheriff's Dept is also pro-CC. Frequently are arrests in our area for drugs, B&E, parole violation, equipment thefts, etc. Don't get me wrong...we are not in a high crime area by any means, just "country" environment which the BG's sometimes think we're easy pickens...NOT!
 
There are a few books reccomended from the site mentioned before. Do any of you guys with practical training and experience know anything about these books? I'm wondering if everything is covered in one of them, if there is one that should be avoided, or anything like that. I know that there's no such thing as too much training and information, I just want to make sure the information I'm getting is valid and practical.

I've received some good training, and I really enjoy articles published by reputable trainers such as Mr. Cooper, or Mr. Ayoob. While these books can provide a good guideline NOTHING and I mean NOTHING can compare with in person instruction. Believe it or not the NRA Course REFUSE TO BE A VICTIM is awesome.. If you're new to firearm ownership, or carrying a firearm i've heard nothing but great things about FRONT SIGHT training.

Check them out at www.Frontsight.com their web prices are kinda high but you can buy a certificate on Ebay for around $200...5 days worth of training for under $200 can't be beat...
 

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