Vehicles


toreskha

Titles are un-American.
It's surprising to me how many people would be seriously up the creek if they were forced to drive a stickshift, paddle a canoe or ride a bicycle in an emergency. It would really be a good thing if more people had at least a rudimentary knowledge of how to operate a wide variety of vehicles if TSHTF.

At a minimum, this should include commonly encountered things:

- Bicycles
- Motorcycles
- Small boats, both human and motor-powered
- Manual transmission motor vehicles
- Semis/buses/RVs/other large vehicles

It also might not hurt for flight schools to formulate an "air survival course" and make it available to the general public - teach people how to react if a pilot suddenly drops dead or is incapacitated. That may make the difference between a fatal crash and a crash landing.
 

Mes0hemi

New member
That is a good point. If there was an emergency and there was only a stickshift around my mom would die! I keep telling her she should learn. As for me, I have no problem driving any vehicle, I am also taking classes to get my rotary engine license and I am currently building a 1 man Helicopter in my garage.
 

HK4U

New member
And while we are at it get in shape. If it comes down to riding a bike, or walking, or running many would be up a creek.
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
dont forget riding a horse.......:thank_you2:
I was thinking about that...but in terms of probability, it's not something you'd likely run across, versus a 4-wheeler or truck. Of course, it's still a useful skill that should be learned. I've done it twice for short periods of time and think that I could probably at least make do if I needed to ride one.
 

gdcleanfun

Banned
IMG_0121.jpg


This is what has been on my left tootsies lately. Don't know how far I could run, or hobble, or shift a clutch. :haha: So I just keep on "carrying on."
 

DocBoCook

Not Negotiable, A Right
I can drive a bus, ambulance, stick, paddle a canoe, operate watercraft with motors, ride a motorcycle, ride a bike and carry a 135lbs pack for 26 miles. And I'm what the military conciders a old and worn out body, oh, and out of shape, but I can still whoop the youngins in all this and working knowledge. Another thing people need is more knowledge in first aid beyond bandaids and tournequets. That would become more than useful if TSHTF
 
W

wolfhunter

Guest
<snipped> Another thing people need is more knowledge in first aid beyond bandaids and tournequets. That would become more than useful if TSHTF

Most first aid classes focus on "call 911, stop the bleeding, start the breathing, protect the wound, and turn the victim over to the EMS crew." If you can find it in your area, the Red Cross offers a 2 day course called Wilderness First Aid, which focuses on "stop the bleeding, start the breathing, protect the wound, call for help, and care for the vicim for 48-72 hours until the EMS crew can get to you." This class was designed for hikers, campers, and others who may find themselves outside the normal 911 grids.
 

ricbak

New member
~~ This class was designed for hikers, campers, and others who may find themselves outside the normal 911 grids.~
Thanks, That's go to know. And is something The B-i-L & I should do. Where we hunt, it is out there. Cell phones do not work, & if the weather decides to turn, A lake effect snow can get ugly in a hurry.
 

mom of 3 angels

New member
I was thinking about that...but in terms of probability, it's not something you'd likely run across, versus a 4-wheeler or truck. Of course, it's still a useful skill that should be learned. I've done it twice for short periods of time and think that I could probably at least make do if I needed to ride one.

Depends on where you live ;) Out here you're just as likely to find a horse as an ATV. And fuel for horses is easier to come by.

I might have trouble with a boat, but then again, there's not much water here so a boat wouldn't get me too far. :no: Other than that, and maybe being able to see over the dash and reach the pedals at the same time in the big rigs, I think I'd be able to limp along in whatever vehicle was available. Thanks for getting some thinking going . . . :biggrin:
 

DocBoCook

Not Negotiable, A Right
I'm a hospital corpsman, and what I have noticed for years is doctors getting territorial over the knowledge the general population has that would keep them out of the Dr's office. I just wish that agencies would let people like me teach what we call the "Gitmo Wounds"-Abdominal Evisceration, Amputation, Burns, Electric Shock, Open Jaw Fracture, Compound Fracture of the Leg, General Fractures/splinting immobilizations, Smoke inhalation, and Sucking chest wounds. This would be much more usefull than JUST Basic CPR and call 911
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
Most first aid classes focus on "call 911, stop the bleeding, start the breathing, protect the wound, and turn the victim over to the EMS crew." If you can find it in your area, the Red Cross offers a 2 day course called Wilderness First Aid, which focuses on "stop the bleeding, start the breathing, protect the wound, call for help, and care for the vicim for 48-72 hours until the EMS crew can get to you." This class was designed for hikers, campers, and others who may find themselves outside the normal 911 grids.
Is that usually offered for free?
 

CathyInBlue

Tool Maker
I can ride a bike from a BMX, banana seat, X-speed, to racing bike. I can ride a motor bike from a moped to a 125 , 750, and if pressed, a 1300, if I can get a feel for the monster's clutch and keep it to a reasonable speed. Along with the bikes, I can drive ATVs, including knowing how not to get myself killed on a three wheeler. Never had cause to mount a snowmobile or a PWC.

I've been on extensive canoeing trips into the middle of BFE, and I can handle a two-person canoe solo, having done so many times. Motorized flotation vehicles are another matter for me, as are sea-going vessels. I can drive any standard automobile, automatic or manual. If it's a specialized sports car with a hair-trigger clutch or some weird shift pattern, I might be fubar.

As for big iron, busses, RVs, big rigs, etc., as long as the air brakes are in good fettle, I can manage with the clutch and transfer case and stick, as long as I don't have to diagnose and repair water in the air brake lines. I'm not expert at pilotting big iron, but in a SHTF scenario, no one's gonna care if the school bus I just commandeered just barrelled through the chainlink fence to get out of the parking lot.

The other end of the spectrum, I've ridden horses in the past, but they were always prepared by someone else. If I just came across a deserted horse ranch, no matter how perfect the tackle and how willing the horse, I'd likely muck up the "mounting" of the saddle to the horse's back and the bit and bridle and all that other jazz.

For a bugout vehicle, there are two options, blend in, or get out. The first option is to look just like all of the other traffic with a regular vehicle, distinguishable only by being the one travelling your particular path to your destination, your safe house, and being subject to the flow of traffic, if the authorities stop you, you're stopped by the authorities.

The other option throws camouflage to the wind and uses a superable vehicle like a military truck or armored vehicle with on-board emergency resources and a more powerful powerplant and extra fuel stores. The downside is you stand out immediately, but no one can seriously pose an impediment to your arriving at your destination. Getting into your destination is another matter.
 

1911 Headbanger

Leave Me Alone!!!
Well, I was raised in a boat, almost, we loved the water. Drove everything from 47' foot houseboat to a 18' jet boat and 14 foot bateau with a small outboard. I was a Paramedic and drove an Ambulance, I've had various cars and trucks with steering column and floor manual shift and auto, I still ride a Harley, raced motorcross and flattrack 250cc when I was much younger, I rode a Bicycle for years. I'm sure I could ride one, but would be a little rusty. I have a CDL License and have driven 10 speed Freightliners to 16 speed Peterbuilts. I've riden horses, but don't claim to be an expert. My band had a 45 foot tour bus that I drove over the years. I could probably ride a hippopotomus, if you could get me on it. I have an old International / McCormick FarmAll Tractor I use on the property. I can't ride a Pogo stick. I'd kill myself!:fie: I rode a flying Dumbo once at Disneyland. Does that count?
 

1911 Headbanger

Leave Me Alone!!!
I can ride a bike from a BMX, banana seat, X-speed, to racing bike. I can ride a motor bike from a moped to a 125 , 750, and if pressed, a 1300, if I can get a feel for the monster's clutch and keep it to a reasonable speed. Along with the bikes, I can drive ATVs, including knowing how not to get myself killed on a three wheeler. Never had cause to mount a snowmobile or a PWC.

I've been on extensive canoeing trips into the middle of BFE, and I can handle a two-person canoe solo, having done so many times. Motorized flotation vehicles are another matter for me, as are sea-going vessels. I can drive any standard automobile, automatic or manual. If it's a specialized sports car with a hair-trigger clutch or some weird shift pattern, I might be fubar.

As for big iron, busses, RVs, big rigs, etc., as long as the air brakes are in good fettle, I can manage with the clutch and transfer case and stick, as long as I don't have to diagnose and repair water in the air brake lines. I'm not expert at pilotting big iron, but in a SHTF scenario, no one's gonna care if the school bus I just commandeered just barrelled through the chainlink fence to get out of the parking lot.

The other end of the spectrum, I've ridden horses in the past, but they were always prepared by someone else. If I just came across a deserted horse ranch, no matter how perfect the tackle and how willing the horse, I'd likely muck up the "mounting" of the saddle to the horse's back and the bit and bridle and all that other jazz.

For a bugout vehicle, there are two options, blend in, or get out. The first option is to look just like all of the other traffic with a regular vehicle, distinguishable only by being the one travelling your particular path to your destination, your safe house, and being subject to the flow of traffic, if the authorities stop you, you're stopped by the authorities.

The other option throws camouflage to the wind and uses a superable vehicle like a military truck or armored vehicle with on-board emergency resources and a more powerful powerplant and extra fuel stores. The downside is you stand out immediately, but no one can seriously pose an impediment to your arriving at your destination. Getting into your destination is another matter.


CathyInBlue, you're either a Woman after my own heart, or the Girl my Momma warned me about!!! :biggrin:
 

sixtracksfn

New member
As far as vehicles go, I can drive most. I'm proficient at both automatic and manual transmissions, human powered water craft, ATV. Its been a long time since I've ridden a bike, but they say its hard to forget how. Not sure how well I could do with the pinched nerve in my back, and that goes for running as well. Ridden a horse a few times, and could probably manage. Motorboats I could manage. Never even been in the cab of a semi so I doubt I'd be to good with them. But I need to get in shape if I'm riding a bike or running in a SHTF situation.
 

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