Vacation Travel Carry Question


Span 24

New member
All,

This is my first post to the forums though I have utilized the website for all of the terrific information it provides.

I live in Indiana and have been an Indiana Carry License Holder for 8 years and a Utah License Holder for 2. My family is planning a Florida vacation over the Christmas Holidays. Because work will not allow me to leave with them my wife and children will be driving to Florida (Indiana, to Kentucky, to Tennessee, to Georgia, then to Florida) and I will be flying down to meet them. I will then join then for the drive back. My wife does not posses a carry permit although she has nothing to disqualify her if she chose to get one.

My problem is that I do not want to leave home for such a long trip without my firearm but of course cannot take it with me on the flight to Florida. How can I legally get my firearm to Florida?

Thanks in advance!!
 

apvbguy

New member
All,



My problem is that I do not want to leave home for such a long trip without my firearm but of course cannot take it with me on the flight to Florida. How can I legally get my firearm to Florida?

Thanks in advance!!

why can't you take your firearm on the flight to FLA?
 

NavyLCDR

New member
My problem is that I do not want to leave home for such a long trip without my firearm but of course cannot take it with me on the flight to Florida. How can I legally get my firearm to Florida?

Thanks in advance!!

The easiest way to get your firearm to Florida is in checked baggage on your flight.

However, you can also send it with your wife, the easiest way to send it with your wife so you don't have to worry about different state laws would be to comply with FOPA:
18 U.S. Code § 926A - Interstate transportation of firearms | LII / Legal Information Institute
18 U.S. Code § 926A - Interstate transportation of firearms

Notwithstanding any other provision of any law or any rule or regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof, any person who is not otherwise prohibited by this chapter from transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm shall be entitled to transport a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm to any other place where he may lawfully possess and carry such firearm if, during such transportation the firearm is unloaded, and neither the firearm nor any ammunition being transported is readily accessible or is directly accessible from the passenger compartment of such transporting vehicle: Provided, That in the case of a vehicle without a compartment separate from the driver’s compartment the firearm or ammunition shall be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
Flying with a handgun in checked baggage is easy. You need a hard sided pistol case that, when locked, cannot be easily pried open. Mine was less then $8 from Ace Hardware. "Airline or TSA approved" means absolutely nothing, it is only an advertising gimmick to jack the price up. I recommend getting as many non-TSA padlocks as the case has spots for, mine is two. I use combination locks to avoid arguing with TSA who gets the keys because by Federal regulation they never get the keys. Again, to make it easy, I got a factory fresh new 20 round box of ammo. Check with the airline where they allow the ammo, some allow in the pistol case, some do not. I locked slide open on the handgun, put it in the case, empty magazine(s) next to the gun and 20 round factory box of ammo in corner of pistol case, lock it with the non-TSA combo lock(s). Locked pistol case goes inside suitcase locked with TSA lock(s).

Proceed to a baggage check-in counter with a real person manning it. Say, "I have an unloaded firearm in my checked baggage that I need to declare". They might, or might not ask you to open the case to show them it is unloaded, but they MUST give you a declaration tag to sign. The declaration tag goes outside and near the pistol case inside the suitcase, not inside the pistol case so TSA can see it without entering the pistol case. Either you, with your luggage, or your luggage by itself will be escorted to a TSA x-ray point, they do their x-ray, possibly a swab on the pistol case, once they can see it is unloaded (slide locked back makes it easy on X-ray, or a chamber flag) your baggage is sent on its way. Usually not more than 30 minutes extra at the most. When you get to your destination, luggage will pop out on the carousel as normal.

why can't you take your firearm on the flight to FLA?

Probably because some LEO, CCW instructor or gun shop employee told him that he couldn't.
 

Stengun

New member
Howdy,

Flying with a handgun in checked baggage is easy. You need a hard sided pistol case that, when locked, cannot be easily pried open. Mine was less then $8 from Ace Hardware. "Airline or TSA approved" means absolutely nothing, it is only an advertising gimmick to jack the price up. I recommend getting as many non-TSA padlocks as the case has spots for, mine is two. I use combination locks to avoid arguing with TSA who gets the keys because by Federal regulation they never get the keys. Again, to make it easy, I got a factory fresh new 20 round box of ammo. Check with the airline where they allow the ammo, some allow in the pistol case, some do not. I locked slide open on the handgun, put it in the case, empty magazine(s) next to the gun and 20 round factory box of ammo in corner of pistol case, lock it with the non-TSA combo lock(s). Locked pistol case goes inside suitcase locked with TSA lock(s).

Proceed to a baggage check-in counter with a real person manning it. Say, "I have an unloaded firearm in my checked baggage that I need to declare". They might, or might not ask you to open the case to show them it is unloaded, but they MUST give you a declaration tag to sign. The declaration tag goes outside and near the pistol case inside the suitcase, not inside the pistol case so TSA can see it without entering the pistol case. Either you, with your luggage, or your luggage by itself will be escorted to a TSA x-ray point, they do their x-ray, possibly a swab on the pistol case, once they can see it is unloaded (slide locked back makes it easy on X-ray, or a chamber flag) your baggage is sent on its way. Usually not more than 30 minutes extra at the most. When you get to your destination, luggage will pop out on the carousel as normal.

Never say firearm, gun, pistol, gat, blaster, heater, or any other slang word for gun inside the airport.

When I flew to Alaska in 2013 I took my Glock 23 and when I approched the ticket counter I told the agent there that I had a piece of luggage to declare. She asked if it was a firearm and I said "Yes." the I did what she said to do step by step.

On the return trip I did the same thing except the ticket agent sent me to the TSA checkpoint and they did the paperwork.

Paul
 

sdprof

Active member
If you don't want to fly with the gun, why can't wife take one with her, properly cased/locked, in the car so you'll have it when you get to FL. She doesn't need a permit to transport the gun.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
Howdy,

Never say firearm, gun, pistol, gat, blaster, heater, or any other slang word for gun inside the airport.
Paul

I've never heard of anyone having a problem saying to a baggage counter person, "I have an unloaded firearm in my checked baggage to declare". At some point we need to just stop being paranoid. Now, saying something like "I have a gun I'd like to take on the plane" might get an undesired reaction. Too much "wink, wink, nudge, nudge" and secrecy just confuses people.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Also never had any issues declaring a firearm at the counter, nor have I met anyone who has.

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

Span 24

New member
Thank you ALL very much for the helpful responses! I asked this question because I did not know whether or not air travel with a firearm was possible and if there were any restrictions on transporting a firearm in an automobile in the states we will travel through. I came to the forum to ask the question of folks who knew more on the subject than I and I am not disappointed!

I will probably just lock the pistol in the original (SIG) hard plastic case, unloaded, and have her pack it in the trunk until I arrive. I will not send any ammunition nor will I carry any on the aircraft. Instead, I will purchase some social ammunition when I arrive a few days after she does. Seems like the safest way to go!

Again, thank you ALL for the helpful input (even the 'not so friendly' ones which were subsequently removed) :happy:
 

RJT CCW

New member
Thank you ALL very much for the helpful responses! I asked this question because I did not know whether or not air travel with a firearm was possible and if there were any restrictions on transporting a firearm in an automobile in the states we will travel through. I came to the forum to ask the question of folks who knew more on the subject than I and I am not disappointed!

I will probably just lock the pistol in the original (SIG) hard plastic case, unloaded, and have her pack it in the trunk until I arrive. I will not send any ammunition nor will I carry any on the aircraft. Instead, I will purchase some social ammunition when I arrive a few days after she does. Seems like the safest way to go!

Again, thank you ALL for the helpful input (even the 'not so friendly' ones which were subsequently removed) :happy:

I would suggest sending at least one box of ammo with the gun. Two reasons, one, ammo may not be readily available at your new location and two., if ammo is available has it been tested in your gun in advance.
 

Arc Angel

New member
Without exception you're always going to be better off if you transport the gun WITHOUT ammunition. In the OP's case because his wife is going to arrive first let her be the one to look around for appropriate ammunition. Which you can also call ahead, purchase, and put on hold for customer pickup after you arrive. (That's what I've done in the past.)

Make sure that pistol is legally transported: empty, locked, away from any available ammunition, and out of immediate reach. This goes for the magazines, too. In part, my wife is legally licensed to carry for exactly reasons like this; but, if this isn't so then, I wouldn't even give my wife a key (or combination) for the gun case's lock.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Without exception you're always going to be better off if you transport the gun WITHOUT ammunition. In the OP's case because his wife is going to arrive first let her be the one to look around for appropriate ammunition. Which you can, also, call ahead, purchase, and put on hold for customer pickup after you arrive. (That's what I've done in the past.)

Why is it better off?

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

Arc Angel

New member
It's better because of the wide variety of firearm transportation laws that exist from state-to-state; as well as the fact that the carrier isn't the actual owner of the gun, and may not be allowed to have constructive possession of the firearm while she's away from home.

In my own situation I'm surrounded on 3 sides by other states with genuinely antithetical firearm laws. In NJ hollow point ammunition - especially transported hollow point ammunition - is illegal to possess unless you're traveling directly to a firing range. Furthermore a detailed reading of New Jersey - and now New York - firearm laws makes it clear that it is technically illegal for an out-of-state resident to either purchase ammunition or, under certain circumstances, even touch a gun while traveling in-state. (Which is why I don't go shooting with any of my relatives! Sure, I could; but I'd be giving any New York or New Jersey judge broad leeway to find me guilty of one technical infraction or another; so I don't.)

You're always better off if you don't push things and play the state's game as closely as possible. Being in possession of a handgun and ammunition when you're not the weapon's registered owner is simply asking for trouble.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
You're always better off if you don't push things and play the state's game as closely as possible. Being in possession of a handgun and ammunition when you're not the weapon's registered owner is simply asking for trouble.

Registered owner?!? Really? The OPs family is traveling from Indiana, to Kentucky, to Tennessee, to Georgia, then to Florida. It is impossible to be a "registered owner" of a firearm in any of those states. You have a severe lack of understand of firearms laws in the lesser restrictive states. There is absolutely no reason whatsoever for not transporting ammunition in the same case as the firearm in any of the states listed. I refuse to cater to what some New York or New Jersey implant thinks about firearm laws in a free state, regardless of if they are wearing a uniform and badge or not. I will abide by what the statute says (most of the time, anyway, I've been known to drive through the Post Office parking lot to drop off a letter in the outside mailbox with a firearm possibly in the holster).

I guess my signature line still holds true, "Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior."
 

Span 24

New member
I will be leaving the ammunition behind. I should have no problem purchasing ammunition in Florida and my wife has no use for it in the car (she has never fired a pistol in her life). In fact, I will ask my brother-in-law (whom we plan to visit) to purchase my chosen social loads prior to my arrival. If, for some strange reason they don't have what I am accustomed to then I'll just have to visit the local range to test whatever they do have!

Thank you all once again for your helpful advice, regardless of your location or beliefs, together with my own experience and training, it helps me to make an informed decision.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
It's better because of the wide variety of firearm transportation laws that exist from state-to-state. The fact that the carrier isn't the actual owner of the gun, and may not be allowed to have constructive possession of the firearm while she's away from home.

In my own situation I'm surrounded on 3 sides by other states with genuinely antithetical firearm laws. In NJ hollow point ammunition - especially transported hollow point ammunition - is illegal to possess unless you're traveling directly to a firing range. Furthermore a detailed reading of New Jersey - and now New York - firearm laws makes it clear that it is technically illegal for an out-of-state resident to either purchase ammunition or, under certain circumstances, even touch a gun while traveling in-state. (Which is why I don't go shooting with any of my relatives! Sure, I could; but I'd be giving any New York or New Jersey judge broad leeway to find me guilty of one technical infraction or another; so I don't.)

You're always better off if you don't push things and play the state's game as closely as possible. Being in possession of a handgun and ammunition when you're not the weapon's registered owner is simply asking for trouble.

Wow...guess I can only say I'm blessed to live in the Northwest.

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

apvbguy

New member
Without exception you're always going to be better off if you transport the gun WITHOUT ammunition. In the OP's case because his wife is going to arrive first let her be the one to look around for appropriate ammunition. Which you can, also, call ahead, purchase, and put on hold for customer pickup after you arrive. (That's what I've done in the past.)

Make sure that pistol is legally transported: empty, locked, away from any available ammunition, and out of immediate reach. This goes for the magazines, too. In part, my wife is legally licensed to carry for exactly reasons like this; but, if this isn't so then, I wouldn't even give my wife a key (or combination) for the gun case's lock.

what nonsense! if the woman is not permitted to possess a firearm the fact that it is unloaded without ammo has little meaning
 

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