U.S. Military Weapons Inscribed With Secret 'Jesus' Bible Codes


By JOSEPH RHEE, TAHMAN BRADLEY and BRIAN ROSSToday, 9:55 AM EST

Coded references to New Testament Bible passages about Jesus Christ are inscribed on high-powered rifle sights provided to the United States military by a Michigan company, an ABC News investigation has found.

The sights are used by U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan and in the training of Iraqi and Afghan soldiers. The maker of the sights, Trijicon, has a $660 million multi-year contract to provide up to 800,000 sights to the Marine Corps, and additional contracts to provide sights to the U.S. Army.

U.S. military rules specifically prohibit the proselytizing of any religion in Iraq or Afghanistan and were drawn up in order to prevent criticism that the U.S. was embarked on a religious "Crusade" in its war against al Qaeda and Iraqi insurgents.

One of the citations on the gun sights, 2COR4:6, is an apparent reference to Second Corinthians 4:6 of the New Testament, which reads: "For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ."

Other references include citations from the books of Revelation, Matthew and John dealing with Jesus as "the light of the world." John 8:12, referred to on the gun sights as JN8:12, reads, "Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life."

Trijicon confirmed to ABCNews.com that it adds the biblical codes to the sights sold to the U.S. military. Tom Munson, director of sales and marketing for Trijicon, which is based in Wixom, Michigan, said the inscriptions "have always been there" and said there was nothing wrong or illegal with adding them. Munson said the issue was being raised by a group that is "not Christian." The company has said the practice began under its founder, Glyn Bindon, a devout Christian from South Africa who was killed in a 2003 plane crash.

'It violates the Constitution'

The company's vision is described on its Web site: "Guided by our values, we endeavor to have our products used wherever precision aiming solutions are required to protect individual freedom."
"We believe that America is great when its people are good," says the Web site. "This goodness has been based on Biblical standards throughout our history, and we will strive to follow those morals."

Spokespeople for the U.S. Army and the Marine Corps both said their services were unaware of the biblical markings. They said officials were discussing what steps, if any, to take in the wake of the ABCNews.com report. It is not known how many Trijicon sights are currently in use by the U.S. military.

The biblical references appear in the same type font and size as the model numbers on the company's Advanced Combat Optical Guides, called the ACOG.

"It's wrong, it violates the Constitution, it violates a number of federal laws," said Michael "Mikey" Weinstein of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, an advocacy group that seeks to preserve the separation of church and state in the military. (Source)

I see nothing wrong or unconstitutional with Trijicon marking their products with the Bible refrences. Now, to be fair, I'm a Christian, so admitidly... I really like the idea of putting Bible references on products. There are many companies who allow their workers to sign their name or motto to a product. I don't see this is any different. If it were a Muslim company plugging Koran references, I'd be less thrilled with the practice. BUT, it still would not be wrong or unconstitutional!

What do y'all think?
 

I don't know Matt, but I'd say our timing is preeeeeety good..
"It's wrong, it violates the Constitution, it violates a number of federal laws," said Michael "Mikey" Weinstein of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation

:mad:
 
I have been researching which red dot sight I might like to purchase. Just another check mark in the Trijicon pro list. Open to suggestions, so any advice is appreciated.
 
I see nothing wrong or unconstitutional with Trijicon marking their products with the Bible refrences. Now, to be fair, I'm a Christian, so admitidly... I really like the idea of putting Bible references on products. There are many companies who allow their workers to sign their name or motto to a product. I don't see this is any different. If it were a Muslim company plugging Koran references, I'd be less thrilled with the practice. BUT, it still would not be wrong or unconstitutional!

What do y'all think?
One Nation Under God. Our Country was founded under the concept that God is Real, that there is only one God, and that the Bible is the Word of God. Those who find that objectionalble, voice that opinion because of the freedoms provided in this society. A society founded by Christians. Only those familiar with the Bible would know what those "codes" were, and how are the lives of the non-believer affected or changed. They are not. It's just the liberal media, supported by the liberal ACLU making noises of objection to Christianity. They do it anywhere they have an opportunity. To separate Church and State, to separate God from Government is to bring demise to a Nation founded on principles of Christianity. That said, I already know the end result................... Revelation.
 
Makes me feel like going out and buying a new Trijicon sight today. :biggrin:

In and Out Burger has biblical verse citations on the bottom of their beverage cups.


gf
 
"It's wrong, it violates the Constitution, it violates a number of federal laws," said Michael "Mikey" Weinstein of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, an advocacy group that seeks to preserve the separation of church and state in the military.

I may be wrong, but isn't this ass backwards? That would be like saying an Israeli company couldn't stamp the Star of David on their products being sold in the U.S.

Religious freedom is the freedom to speak of and practice your religion...Not the freedom to be sheltered from every religion you don't follow.
 
The man that started the company is a Christian. If he wants to promote his Christianity he has the right. I think I will by one.
 
Nitpicking by the Athiests. I mean, with all the activity going on in combat, WHO CARES?
One would think a soldier in enemy land would have a lot more to worry about than this silly sh*t.






'It violates the Constitution'
Bulls*t. The constitution prevents the government from stamping a Bible verse on a scope. Nothing in the constitution prevents a privately owned company from stamping ANYTHING it wants on it's own product.




.

.
 
It is NOT un-Constitutional. However, in the current political climate, the company will probably lose its military contract. Which, of course, is Biblical in that Christians will be persecuted (in this case, in the form of loss of revenue which helps to support a lot of people).
 
We say "God Bless America" all the time and when a company that supports our troops offends some mindless Muslim terrorist, I don't give a Sh** what the leeral media says. If the company changes the practice, shame on them. I am tired of people saying they worry about offending those that want us dead. F*** 'em!
 
Didn't someone once say there were no atheists in a foxhole? Maybe they said there were no atheists on the beach at D-Day. I wonder if "Mikey" has been shot at before? I can't imagine praying to Obama, Tom Cruise or Oprah if I'm being shot at.
 
Congress is prohibited by the Constitution from establishing a national religion. Trijicon is not Congress and they are not establishing a region. So there's nothing unconstitutional here. Displaying the 10 commandments is not establishing a religion either. Nobody is required to belong to a particular religion to own property, get a job, vote, etc. All the crap about separation of church and state is just that - crap.
 
Didn't someone once say there were no atheists in a foxhole?

Most guys don't give a rats a** one way or the other. We just do our job and go about our business.

As far as the ACOG fiasco, I hear some scopes are equipped with “cross” hairs, too. That's so insensitive. :) But seriously though, who really cares? My ACOG puts the rounds where I need them. That's all that matters.
 
......

As far as the ACOG fiasco, I hear some scopes are equipped with “cross” hairs, too. That's so insensitive. :) .........

The whole object is to use the cross on the muslim terrorist and send them to the other side as quickly as possible. No sense keeping him from his heavenly harem.

-Doc
 
Liberals at it again

OK, so Trijicons been putting this on their sights for years and nobody but the enemy is complaining. I also don't understand, Muslims yell Allah akbar or what the heck they yell every time they blow up innocent civilians, women and children or behead people. Now they are upset because this sight has a reference to a Bible verse. I say keep the verse and send them to meet their maker. I would even suggest dipping the ammo in pigs blood just to seal the deal.

Wind-age and elevation will help you to reach out and touch someone.
 
There's nothing wrong with someone etching something biblical on their product. Especially if it mean something good.
 

New Threads

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
49,539
Messages
611,234
Members
74,950
Latest member
gman8309
Back
Top