Travel to Alaska


EarlyRiser

New member
It appears I have no way to transport my Glock 19 TO Alaska?? I have been reading thru Canada Rules and Regs, and there's NO WAY I want to even attempt that. Any suggestions (?) as my wife and I are going to visit for 3 months in 2011
 

Saltcreek

New member
Don't know where you are headed but there are several options besides through Canada. 1. Fly to Alaska and rent a vehicle when you get there. 2. Take the Ferry from Washington. 3. Ship your gun to an FFL dealer at the location you are headed and pick it up when you get there. By the way, with all the big critters there, I think my choice would be my S&W M29 Mountain Gun instead of my G19 - just sayin'. :pleasantry:
 

EarlyRiser

New member
Thanks . . . . We are taking a 5th wheel for about 2 or 3 months. FFL to FFL sounds like a decent idea. By the way, I am far more worried about the unpredictable 2-leged varmits versus the 4-legged predictable ones.
 

OldOwl

New member
Sounds like quite an adventure. I worked for my oldest brother's tire store for a few years, and two guys came in and wanted 6 10 ply tires (2 spares) for their Land rover. They were going to drive as close as they could to the Arctic Circle. I remember they brought some photos to show us when they returned. They said the heater wouldn't keep up with the cold even on full blast, so they had to hang a blanket behind the front seats to contain the warmth. Their sandwiches were frozen solid in the back seat. Things can get ugly fast there. Hope you take some pix to share with us.
 

retirednak

New member
The only thing I can suggest is either ship your Glock to a gun store(I can recommend a couple)and pick it up when you get here,or buy another gun when visit our great State. I refuse to travel through Canada again without a firearm,I've never felt more naked in my life. Send me a PM if you need the name of a couple gun shops.
 

Islander

New member
You can send it to yourself in care of another person. You don't need to use an FFL to send the firearm. For handguns, you can't use USPS. The only issue is finding someone to receive it for you if you send it in advance. If you delay shipping until you arrive, no issues.

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/unlicensed-persons.html


Q: May a nonlicensee ship a firearm through the U.S. Postal Service?
A nonlicensee may not transfer a firearm to a non-licensed resident of another State. A nonlicensee may mail a shotgun or rifle to a resident of his or her own State or to a licensee in any State. The Postal Service recommends that long guns be sent by registered mail and that no marking of any kind which would indicate the nature of the contents be placed on the outside of any parcel containing firearms. Handguns are not mailable. A common or contract carrier must be used to ship a handgun.

[18 U.S.C. 1715, 922(a)(3), 922(a)(5) and 922 (a)(2)(A)]

Q: May a nonlicensee ship a firearm by common or contract carrier?
A nonlicensee may ship a firearm by a common or contract carrier to a resident of his or her own State or to a licensee in any State. A common or contract carrier must be used to ship a handgun. In addition, Federal law requires that the carrier be notified that the shipment contains a firearm and prohibits common or contract carriers from requiring or causing any label to be placed on any package indicating that it contains a firearm.

[18 U.S.C. 922(a)(2)(A), 922(a) (3), 922(a)(5) and 922(e), 27 CFR 478.31 and 478.30]

Q: May a nonlicensee ship firearms interstate for his or her use in hunting or other lawful activity?
Yes. A person may ship a firearm to himself or herself in care of another person in the State where he or she intends to hunt or engage in any other lawful activity. The package should be addressed to the owner. Persons other than the owner should not open the package and take possession of the firearm.
 

retirednak

New member
As far as the USPS goes,you can ship a hand gun in pieces. I usually send my frame in one box and the slide and clips in another. I found out this info at our local post office. You do have to let them know that you are shipping a part of a gun. I always ship insured and someone must sign for it when it arrives. I usually leave the box open and seal it in front of the postal employee.
 

Islander

New member
As far as the USPS goes,you can ship a hand gun in pieces. I usually send my frame in one box and the slide and clips in another. I found out this info at our local post office. You do have to let them know that you are shipping a part of a gun. I always ship insured and someone must sign for it when it arrives. I usually leave the box open and seal it in front of the postal employee.



WRONG! No offense RetiredNak, just want our readers to know the facts and the law, regardless of what the postal employee behind the counter says. I know you were talking about postal regulations; but this is restricted by Federal Law.

You can send ONLY the parts of the gun that are not designated as the "firearm" part of the handgun. That means no serialized frames. Also can NOT send the "silencer" part of a silencer, which is normally the serial numbered external tube. ONLY FFLs can send handguns or firearms using USPS, and then only if they send to another FFL. And a handgun frame is considered by law to be a handgun.

PLEASE do not send handguns through USPS unless you are an FFL or certain law enforcement.

The key language is here. NOTE that "firearm" by definition includes the frame of a pistol or handgun:

18 USC 1715 starts with: "Pistols, revolvers, and other firearms capable of being concealed on the person are nonmailable"

18 USC 921
"Sec. 921. Definitions

(a) As used in this chapter--

(3) The term "firearm'' means (A) any weapon (including a starter gun) which will or is designed to or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive; (B) the frame or receiver of any such weapon; (C) any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; or (D) any destructive device. Such term does not include an antique firearm."

(29) The term “handgun” means—
(A) a firearm which has a short stock and is designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand; and
(B) any combination of parts from which a firearm described in subparagraph (A) can be assembled.

"DEFINITION OF "FIREARM": 18 USC § 921(a)(3), (4). Any weapon (including a starter gun) which will expel a projectile by means of an explosive or is designed or may be readily converted to do so. This includes the frame or receiver of any such weapon, any firearm muffler or silencer or any destructive device. A "destructive device" includes any explosive, incendiary or poison gas --- (i)bomb; (ii) grenade or (iii) similar device, or any combination of parts designed or intended for use in converting any device into a destructive device, or from which a destructive device may be readily assembled. Does not include antique firearms.
Link Removed
 

retirednak

New member
Thanks for the info,I'm going to print this out and take it back to the post office and see what they say. It appears I've been lucky sending my guns when I travel.
 

EarlyRiser

New member
"Retirednak" I hear you about feeling naked in Canada. That's a looonnng haul, and who knows what could happen. I don't want to be broken down out on the Alaskan Highway without protection. That was the whole idea of buying "personal protection". I would guess IF Canada border officials locate my gun, it would be confiscated? OR the Feds would on my return?
 

retirednak

New member
If you get caught with a hand gun,you will lose it forever,won't get to travel through Canada and may get to spend time in jail. When I bought my last car in the lower 48,I was stopped and searched. The woman agent was a real bitch and asked me so many questions,I got upset and refused to answer any personal questions about my life and any questions about firearms other then I did not travel with any on this trip. When she was done,another agent searched my car. I asked him what crawled up her butt,he laughed and said she was on a power trip and I should be glad she wasn't doing the searching. He said he feels sorry for people pulling RV's when the woman is doing the searching. They were searching every vehicle pulling a trailer and every other car or pickup. This was after 9/11 and before passports were required to travel through Canada for Alaskans. I did notice they have hidden cameras viewing into vehicles before stopping at the first check point. I can assume its to see people trying to hide things. They do profile at the check point into Canada. I hadn't shaved for a couple days and with a tan and American Indian blood lines,I was a tad brown skinned. This was the border check point outside of WA state. I've also had friends that haven't been checked at all going through Canada. I wouldn't take the chance of loosing my gun or being locked up in Canada. The US check points are a breeze.

If your going to be in the Wasilla area or Anchorage area,I can give you the names of gun shops that you can send your firearm to ahead of time.
 

weekendskp

New member
My son is flying from Missouri to Anchorage, AK in two weeks to spend two months in Port Alsworth (aka BFE). He's taking a Ruger .44 Magnum Vaquero. IMO, that's the "bear" minimum. Ha ha. That was a play on words. He should be okay if 1. checks it in a locked metal case (locks on both sides of the handle, not just one in the middle). 2. Declares at check in. Any other requirements or advice is requested.
 

retirednak

New member
The locks on the gun must be TSA approved type. That way only your son and the TSA agent will have a key to his gun. If he uses a regular lock,TSA will cut the lock off and will not replace it,leaving the thief's working for the airlines access to it.
When I travel,I use the TSA lock with a cable. I then lock the gun case to the inside of my bag so there is no chance of the whole case walking off once everything is closed up and moved to the back.

Your sons 44 mag will do just fine for bear protection. I used my old Black Hawk for 30 yrs up here. Hate carrying the hog leg around because of the weight. Make sure when it arrives to purchase "Bear Loads" along with some play rounds. Tell him to have fun from a local!
 

Islander

New member
Do NOT use a TSA lock for airline travel with firearms

The locks on the gun must be TSA approved type. That way only your son and the TSA agent will have a key to his gun. If he uses a regular lock,TSA will cut the lock off and will not replace it,leaving the thief's working for the airlines access to it.

Great post about bears and guns, but this part is 100% wrong. You may not use a TSA lock. Specifically, only the traveler (your son) may have a key/combo to your gun locks, not TSA and not anyone else. You may get away with sending a TSA lock through, but that is against Federal and TSA policy.

LINK TO TSA GUIDELINES: Traveling with Special Items: Firearms & Ammunition

- You must declare all firearms to the airline during the ticket counter check-in process.
- The firearm must be unloaded.
- The firearm must be in a hard-sided container.
- The container must be locked. A locked container is defined as one that completely secures the firearm from access by anyone other than you. Cases that can be pulled open with little effort do not meet this criterion. The pictures provided here illustrate the difference between a properly packaged and an improperly packaged firearm.
- We recommend that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain in the area designated by the aircraft operator or TSA representative to take the key back after the container is cleared for transportation. If you are not present and the security officer must open the container, we or the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact you. If we can't contact you, the container will not be placed on the plane. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.
- You must securely pack any ammunition in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging that is specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition.
- You can't use firearm magazines/clips for packing ammunition unless they completely and securely enclose the ammunition (e.g., by securely covering the exposed portions of the magazine or by securely placing the magazine in a pouch, holder, holster or lanyard).
- You may carry the ammunition in the same hard-sided case as the firearm, as long as you pack it as described above.
- You can't bring black powder or percussion caps used with black-powder type firearms in either your carry-on or checked baggage.

We and other authorities strictly enforce these regulations. Violations can result in criminal prosecution and civil penalties of up to $10,000 per violation.
 

Islander

New member
My son is flying from Missouri to Anchorage, AK in two weeks to spend two months in Port Alsworth (aka BFE). He's taking a Ruger .44 Magnum Vaquero. IMO, that's the "bear" minimum. Ha ha. That was a play on words. He should be okay if 1. checks it in a locked metal case (locks on both sides of the handle, not just one in the middle). 2. Declares at check in. Any other requirements or advice is requested.

Here is a great resource for airline flying, complete with reports of experiences on various airlines:

Airline Travel with Firearms
 

NavyLCDR

New member
I need to quit offering advice,feel like a jerk for the wrong info.

Don't feel bad or alone. Jet Blue recommends committing a Federal felony on their own website:

JetBlue | Help)

All firearms must be unloaded and must be packed in either a crush-proof container specifically designed for the firearm, or in a hard-sided container. The container must be lockable and only the individual checking the baggage should retain the key or combination. Any container which cannot be locked is not acceptable. TSA recommends that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain present during screening to take the key back after the container is cleared.

I am going to send them an email now to show them the error of their ways.
 

Islander

New member
Don't feel bad or alone. Jet Blue recommends committing a Federal felony on their own website:

JetBlue | Help)

I am going to send them an email now to show them the error of their ways.

This is one of those sketchy areas. TSA has changed their language on it. While originally it said you MUST be present during the inspection, they recognized that in some airports you cannot be present during the inspection of the firearm, and in those cases direct you to provide the key/combo "temporarily" to the agent. In that case you remain in an area designated by the airline until you can get your key back or confirm the case is locked. Here is the exact language:

LINK: TSA Traveling with Special Items

We recommend that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain in the area designated by the aircraft operator or TSA representative to take the key back after the container is cleared for transportation. If you are not present and the security officer must open the container, we or the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact you. If we can't contact you, the container will not be placed on the plane. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.
 

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