Thinking about getting into reloading


imrambi

New member
I've been looking at the Hornady Lock-n-Load AP. Is anyone using it? What are the thoughts?
 

I have a lock-n-load classic press/kit from Hornady. Wanna hear (read) something funny or sad, depending on your point of view? I haven't used it yet. I have powder, bullets, brass, primers, several reloading handbooks, dies and all supplies needed to reload .40 and .223. It's mounted down in my man-cave. I bought it all so I'd have it to pass on to the kids if it comes to the point that it's the only way to obtain reliable ammo.

Soooo, I need to start learning to reload, and to practice so I can develop the skill in order to pass it on. The problem? I'm a lazy sumbitch.

...So I guess I don't have any useful thoughts for you after all. My bad.
 
I don't have that one, but I have heard good things about it. I have a LEE anniversary single stage. It is slow but very reliable.
 
I don't have that one, but I have heard good things about it. I have a LEE anniversary single stage. It is slow but very reliable.

My daughters fiance has a Lee press and swears by it. "Reliable" is the important word up there, right? :)
 
As I've said before, I don't recommend starting out with a complicated multi functioning machine. In the begining, you need to follow the process one step at a time until familiar with how it all works. Reloading is not for the sloppy or careless individuals and requires focus and attention for reliable and safe ammo.
 
Hello...new member and first post.

I have been running the Hornady LnL progressive for a couple of years now. I have run several thousand 9 and 10 mm with no issues. The press has been very reliable and easy to use. It takes a little time to get set up but once done I average about 400 rounds per hour. I think I could push it up another 100 if I tried.

This was my 1st press when I decided to start reloading and I have no regrets. You will also need a good scale ( I prefer digital ) and a good manual. I have the Hornady reloading manual but also bought a loadbooks USA for both calibers that contain data from all the major powder and bullet companys. I do tend to use the Hornady data more than the others though.
 
where is the best placed online to look for supplies? we are wanting to start reloading. i have a .380 and my husband a .45. does anyone know about the cost effectiveness of reloading for .380. he believes his calculations may be off.
 
where is the best placed online to look for supplies? we are wanting to start reloading. i have a .380 and my husband a .45. does anyone know about the cost effectiveness of reloading for .380. he believes his calculations may be off.

I buy the majority of my reloading equipment from Midway USA, http://www.midwayusa.com/, powder and primers I buy local so I don't have to pay hazmat shipping fee's.

Keep in mind your start up costs before anything. It is not a fast money saver. The more you shoot the more you save.

The loads I run for 45 are at 55% savings, 380 is at 60% savings. Both of which I use Berry's plated bullets. You can go much cheaper using lead and even cheaper if you cast your own.
 
We decided to take the plunge into reloading. One of the ranges let us come and grab some brass off the ground since we shoot there often. We cleaned the brass and now are in the process of inspecting, depriming and repriming.
 
I would start with a single stage press, they are not overly expensive and you can learn each stage of the process very intimately, before you get really involved. I started 17 yrs ago with a hornady press kit, I feel that the Hornady load manuals offer outstanding info. I have thought about a progressive press but am not sold on the powder dump process. I am VERY anal about the powder measure. I now have a Redding T-7 Turret press and turn out lots of ammo. It is still very time consuming but I enjoy doing it. I still use my original press for sizing my .40 brass with the Redding GRX die. I have heard good things about the Hornady progressive press. As for components on line, unless you are purchasing large quantities, I would buy at a local store and save the hazmat charges. Start small and build up, its a very fun process!
 
I have a lock-n-load classic press/kit from Hornady. Wanna hear (read) something funny or sad, depending on your point of view? I haven't used it yet. I have powder, bullets, brass, primers, several reloading handbooks, dies and all supplies needed to reload .40 and .223. It's mounted down in my man-cave. I bought it all so I'd have it to pass on to the kids if it comes to the point that it's the only way to obtain reliable ammo.

Soooo, I need to start learning to reload, and to practice so I can develop the skill in order to pass it on. The problem? I'm a lazy sumbitch.

...So I guess I don't have any useful thoughts for you after all. My bad.

So get in the Cave and start learning how it works, it ain't rocket science! you have the equipt. Git R Done! Lots of help out here if you get stuck. have fun! Just be careful with the powder charge!
 
hand gun reloading

I have been reloading for my rifles and enjoy it a lot. We recently bought a Ruger p95 9mm and a LCP 380. I want to start reloading for these two pistols.
I ask other shooters at the range if I can have their brass if I see them shooting 9mm. I am trying to build up my supply of brass before beginning to reload. I'm really looking forward to the improvement in accuracy in our pistols. Reloading rifle ammo improved the accuracy of our rifles.
We are taking our chl training in Jan.
 
oops!

I forgot to mention I use a RCBS rock chucker kit. This is what my mentor used and I like to be consistent.

Having a mentor for reloading has helped me greatly. I highly recommend having one if you're new to reloading.
 

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