Storing loaded clips


Jeffrey1235

New member
I may be showing my stupidity but does it hurt a clip to leave it loaded? Such as using a Hi point C9 as a CC weapon that may or may not be fired all that often. Will the springs in the clip get weak etc.?
 

I am going to jump in here..... My thoughts are that springs get weak due to compression/uncompression, that said it would depend on the amount of use, or just keep an eye out when doing cleaning and or general inspection.You should be able to detect a weak spring if there are more than normal feeding malfunctions, ai would think. Plus, I am sure there is lots of fourms out there on that subject. The key is use your best judgement and weed out the crap. Good Luck.
 
All of my firearms stay fully loaded, some of which are over 18 years old and have no weak springs. I have never had to replace a magazine spring. Magazine. ;)
 
I may be showing my stupidity but does it hurt a clip to leave it loaded? Such as using a Hi point C9 as a CC weapon that may or may not be fired all that often. Will the springs in the clip get weak etc.?


By definition, a "clip" doesn't have a spring. The term you're looking for is "magazine". With that said, I would recommend that you read your owners manual to see if it contains the answer to your question. If you can't find the answer in the owner's manual, contact the manufacturer. We as fellow gun owners may have experience with a particular firearm, but our answers to you would be our opinions. The manufaturer would be able to tell you how the firearm was designed and what the capabilities should be.

Most reputable firearms manufacturers design their magazines to be stored fully loaded. All of my magazines are fully loaded unless I'm transporting them by air due to various airline and FAA regulations.

If you're planning on carrying a firearm concealed or otherwise, I would strongly recommend hitting the range once a month, or at minimum every other month. Should you ever need to use your firearm to defend yourself, you won't have time to think about what to do. You'll barely have any time to react. I could go further into detail, but that would be going too far off subject. :wink:

Hope I've been able to answer your question.



gf
 
Thanks for the info, I apreciate it. Most of my handguns are either revolvers or the break open type. This Hi Point C9 is the first semi-auto one that I've bought. What I was basing my question on is an after market large capacity magazine that I bought for a Rugar 10/22. It is a 25 round magazine. To make a long story short I left one loaded for a few days and noticed that when I went to fire it, it fired five or six shots and stopped. I looked down and the other 19 rounds were still way down in the magazine. I returned that one and haven't had a problem with the replacement. I wondered if this was a common problem or what. (as far as hitting the range. . . I have to kick myself because I live on an old farm. I do most of my shooting in an old, empty pasture that has a great back stop. I don't do anywhere near enough practicing. I have actually been kicking around the idea of trying to find some interested gun owners and setting up a private range but i've never done it. I've always figured that any insurance requirements would put a stop to the idea.)
 
Last edited:
Thanks for the info, I apreciate it. Most of my handguns are either revolvers or the break open type. This Hi Point C9 is the first semi-auto one that I've bought. What I was basing my question on is an after market large capacity magazine that I bought for a Rugar 10/22. It is a 25 round magazine. To make a long story short I left one loaded for a few days and noticed that when I went to fire it, it fired five or six shots and stopped. I looked down and the other 19 rounds were still way down in the magazine. I returned that one and haven't had a problem with the replacement. I wondered if this was a common problem or what. (as far as hitting the range. . . I have to kick myself because I live on an old farm. I do most of my shooting in an old, empty pasture that has a great back stop. I don't do anywhere near enough practicing. I have actually been kicking around the idea of trying to find some interested gun owners and setting up a private range but i've never done it. I've always figured that any insurance requirements would put a stop to the idea.)


I've had problems with a few aftermarket 10/22 magazines. I normally mark all of my magazines for all of my firearms so I can quickly determine if a particular magazine is giving me problems. The problem with one of the 10/22 magazines was the follower would bind and get stuck. Part of it may have been the spring, but I think it was mainly the follower due to the stiffness of the spring when loading.

As for setting up a range on your property, shouldn't be too difficult to do. There are a lot of farmers here in PRHI who have large plots of land that they have converted for target practice and plinkng. The insurance wasn't too bad, so long as they don't do it for commercial purposes. A few of them actually use the range for NRA training.



gf
 
If you're planning on carrying a firearm concealed or otherwise, I would strongly recommend hitting the range once a month, or at minimum every other month. Should you ever need to use your firearm to defend yourself, you won't have time to think about what to do. You'll barely have any time to react. I could go further into detail, but that would be going too far off subject. :wink:gf

Off subject or not I think that is a really important point.

I have talked to several folks lately who basically say they never shoot or unload their carry so it will be ready when they need it. That seems kind of backwards logic to me. I shoot my carry at least a little everytiume I go plinkin'. That way I am familiar with it and know everything is running right when I need it.

If you do that, you should detect any issues in your mags before they let you down at a critical time.

-bumble
 
The 'spring set' myth has been going around for a long time. I'm glad to see so many people on this forum have more brains than to fall for that load of crap. I have been in many debates about this subject, and from all the research I've done, this is my conclusion:

-springs DO NOT wear out from long term compression

-it is the repeated compression/decompression that produces microscopic cracks in the metal, thus decreasing spring tension

-steel has an 'elastic limit,' meaning you can bend it until a certain point, and the spring will return to normal shape. Once the spring is bent past the elastic limit, then it will not return to normal shape. Any decent magazine manufacturer will make sure that thier mag springs do not reach elastic limit when fully loaded.

There are several stories of people finding old WWII firearms that have remained loaded for decades, and still cycled perfectly. If long-term compression did wear out mag springs, then sixty years should make that magazine inoperable, you would think.

Bottom line is, keep your mags fully loaded. That's what they are there for. An unloaded mag is useless, and a downloaded mag is foolish. Those one or two extra rounds could be the difference between life and death, and frankly, I don't see the point in trying to preserve a five dollar spring if it means carrying less ammo even IF the myth was true. Educate yourself on the facts, don't buy into bullsh**.

Here's a decent article explaining elastic limit:
Magazine spring madness: 'creep' to your 'elastic limit' to un-earth the urban legend of 'spring-set' | American Handgunner | Find Articles at BNET
 
Leave your magazines loaded. I have some 45 and AR magazines that have been packed away loaded to the max for over 20 years. They are just as good as the day I loaded them.
 
leave them loaded! springs don't get tired. here is a great article I found a while ago when I had the exact same question.

Magazine spring madness: 'creep' to your 'elastic limit' to un-earth the urban legend of 'spring-set' | American Handgunner | Find Articles at BNET

The shooting sports are full of some of the most knowledgeable and capable people you'll meet anywhere. I've been impressed consistently with the abilities of those I meet at the range to diagnose and fix a gun problem with as little as some spray lube and a cotton swab. However, sometimes a myth will creep into the folklore.

The magazine spring myth has been around for many years and is growing in popularity. It goes something like this: "You should unload your magazines when they're not in use or the spring will weaken causing failures to feed." This has gone as far as shooting competitors actually unloading their magazines between stages to extend the life of their springs. A variant of this myth is: "You should never load a magazine to capacity and should always leave it one round short." What if you need that round some day?

Recently, I read an article in a gun magazine suggesting you rotate your magazines so the ones not in use can "recover and rest." The same author uses the phrase "spring-set" to describe weakness of a spring because it was compressed for a long time. Hogwash. There's nothing further from the truth. Springs don't care how long they're compressed and don't require rest, recreation or even a vacation from time to time.

To put this one to rest, you have to understand creep. Creep is the slow flow of a non-ferric metal like copper, brass and lead under force. At temperatures outside of a furnace, steel doesn't have any appreciable creep. Under most conditions, steel flexes and then returns to its original shape. When pushed past its elastic limit, steel will bend and not return to its original shape. All designers of well-made magazines make sure the spring never approaches the elastic limit when the magazine is fully loaded. Honest. This means the spring will not weaken when the magazine is fully loaded -- not even over an extended time. Like 50 years. American Handgunner recently ran a story about a magazine full of .45 ACP that had been sitting since WWII and it ran just fine on the first try. So there you go.

Now that the light of truth is leaking out, lets talk about what is causing failures to feed. The only way to weaken a magazine spring is to flex it past its normal range (elastic limit). If this is happening, somebody is trying to overload a magazine or has "adjusted" it by bending the spring. Both of these could cause feed failures. Shame on you if you're a spring bender.

Carlton Nether, Customer Service for Beretta USA, tells us keeping a pistol magazine loaded for an extended period doesn't cause magazine spring failure, however, failures to feed can result. He says, "The ammo will 'roll' in the magazine. If the mags are kept loaded and moved around a lot -- say on a cop's belt -- the rolling action can, over time, cause creases in the cases. These creases can cause malfunctions. Also the top bullet will roll against the magazine lips and creasing can occur there as well. Just check old ammo that's been bouncing around in a magazine for a long time.

We tell police officers if they keep loaded magazines, take a few seconds to "cycle" the ammo. Periodically unload the mag and reload it in a different sequence. This movement will allow the bullets to be in different parts of the magazine and help eliminate creasing.

At STI, Dave Skinner, President and CEO says, "Personally, I rotate my 'under the bed' and 'under the seat' mags about every six months. I always empty them the 'fun' way and have never had a failure." Given what we learned above, this sounds like a good idea. Smith and Wesson customer service also says magazines can stay loaded indefinitely without hurting the spring.

As we add force onto a spring, it will displace the same amount for each amount of force we add. This is true until the spring passes a certain point called the elastic limit. Robert Hooke discovered this theory back in 1660. Hooke's Law states: "If the applied forces on a body are not too large, the deformations resulting are directly proportional to the forces producing them." Which means, in actual human being language, if we load a spring past its elastic limit, it permanently deforms. It still provides a force against the load but the force is no longer proportional. If this happens, when we unload the spring (such as when we empty a magazine that has been over-loaded) the spring never returns to a state where it can provide the same load for the same amount of displacement.

Trust Us

When a magazine manufacturer designs a spring, they plan for a preload. The spring is already compressed some in the magazine. On the curve below, this would be Point A. The spring compression would be designed to be below the Elastic Limit. When fully compressed, the spring would be at Point B. If the spring is ever compressed past the elastic limit, say to Point C, it won't ever behave the same. Like a recalcitrant lazy Uncle, it will have a lower spring force for each amount of displacement. On the drawing, the spring would now cycle between points D and E. This means that -- particularly with the last bullet or two -- the force pushing the bullet up would be less and lo-and-behold, a mis-feed might occur.
 
Short answer, no. Mag springs are COMPRESSION springs, which means they are designed to be compressed. As the other posters have said, the metal fatigue comes from loading/unloaded over a period of years, even decades. Unless you get a mag with a defective spring that slipped thru QC, storing loaded will not affect the spring.
 
Thanks for the info, I apreciate it. Most of my handguns are either revolvers or the break open type. This Hi Point C9 is the first semi-auto one that I've bought. What I was basing my question on is an after market large capacity magazine that I bought for a Rugar 10/22. It is a 25 round magazine. To make a long story short I left one loaded for a few days and noticed that when I went to fire it, it fired five or six shots and stopped. I looked down and the other 19 rounds were still way down in the magazine. I returned that one and haven't had a problem with the replacement. I wondered if this was a common problem or what. (as far as hitting the range. . . I have to kick myself because I live on an old farm. I do most of my shooting in an old, empty pasture that has a great back stop. I don't do anywhere near enough practicing. I have actually been kicking around the idea of trying to find some interested gun owners and setting up a private range but i've never done it. I've always figured that any insurance requirements would put a stop to the idea.)

Most after market magazines for the 10/22 are not worth a damn. I have tried Butler Creek, Shooters Ridge, Eagle etc...

The only decent one I have found is made by Tactical Innovations.
 
As the guys have pointed out,
'CLIPS', often called 'Stripper Clips' simply hold bullets for insertion into a MAGAZINE...

That magazine might be internal in the rifle, as with SKS, Mauser 98, ect.
Or it might be a detachable MAGAZINE, like with semi-automatic pistols or rifles.

I know we are nit-picking with saying 'SEMI' automatic and 'Magazines' instead of clips,
To say 'Firearms' instead of 'Guns', ect.
But there are people out there that would jump on ANY chance to limit ownership.
Correct terminology is the first step to education is to be specific so we don't wind up with a 'Gun Ban' trying to slip by congress instead of a 'High Capacity Magazine' ban...

Remember, the entire 'Black Talon' ban was stired up over one coroner's assistant being quoted as saying about a California workplace shooting,
"She was shot 11 times with 'Black Talons', She didn't have a chance."

The corner's assistant was firearms literate, he knew a Black Talon from a piece of cake,
And his point was the victim was shot 11 times, but it was twisted by the anti-gun media into a crusade against one of the best self defense rounds and hunting rounds ever built!

Now, not one word about the mental patient that was allowed to purchase a handgun out of his home state (Utah),
Not one word about the 3 months of threats and break-ins the guy had done without the police doing anything about it,
Not even the fact that the woman had called police and told them the guy was following her to work, and called again when she got to work, but police didn't respond.

Besides, 11 rounds into anyone would pretty much do the job, but the BULLETS were blamed!
Now I can't get the best penetration/stopping round every made simply because the media blamed the BULLETS that were used!

Loose lips sink ships...
Use the CORRECT terminology, put the emphasis on the BAD GUYS, show responsible, even tempered arguments even when the 'Anti-Gunners' get wild and out of control,
(Let THEM look like the raving lunatics in the sound bites!)

Stalking laws have come a long way,
Domestic violence threats and workplace threats are taken seriously now,
But you STILL have to be vigilant of what you say and do or the 'Sound Bite' might show up on 'CNN' or 'You Tube' at exactly the WRONG moment!

----------------------------------------------

Now, for your questions,

Most magazines use MUSIC WIRE springs, which DO COMPRESS over time, and they DO loose some of the spring tension every time they are compressed.
I can provide details since we have a dyno where I work for determining EXACTLY that very thing,
And we DO produce springs for industry and aircraft, which have SUPER tight tolerances in regards to cycle life...
(You REALLY don't want an air craft engine spring to quit mid flight!)

Since they have to be compressed and then you expect them to come back to full extension to push bullets up,
You have to think of 'Cycles Of Compression'.

Music wire springs DO LOOSE tension every single time they are compressed, so eventually they will NOT return to a point where they function with sufficient force to do the job you want them to.

We ran into this a lot in the 70's with racing engine valve springs.
Compression cycles in a 500 mile race at 7 to 10 thousand RPM, the music wire springs would fail to hold the valves shut against turbo or supercharged engines,

Turns out, music wire, no matter how good the grade, wasn't ever intended to be COMPRESSED!
Music wire was intended to be STRETCHED in a straight line and hold tension!

------------------------------------------------

What you need for proper compression in springs is a Chrome Silicone type steel.

Chrome Silicone has some 'Memory' for it's exact shape, and will cycle about 400,000 times longer and still function.

In the early parts of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, the M-9 (Baretta 92) wouldn't fire more than once or twice before it failed.
The problem was the music wire magazines had been in storage too long, and the spring wouldn't push the next bullet in the mag up fast enough.

We scrambled around here to make several hundred chrome silicone springs to replace the music wire springs and the pistols would then cycle again.

The military has since stopped issuing 'Chessman' magazines, and started refitting the mags with chrome silicone springs.

We DID NOT get the contract, although we shipped several thousand chrome silicone springs to the troops for free just to keep them in the fight while the military was 'Assessing' the 'Issue'...

(It's an 'Issue' when you are safe at home every night, and you are doing 'Studies' to see what's going on,
It's a PROBLEM, and a BIG ONE, if you are the troops getting shot at and can't return fire because the &^*% pistol won't function!)

----------------------------------------------

Same issue with the three gas rings on the M-16 bolt.
The 'Music Wire' those gas rings were made of open up in a horse shoe shape, tails gouge the bolt carrier sealing surface, and the rifle no longer functions reliably...
(Made by the lowest bidder!)

I sent several thousand (about 6,000 in all) one piece chrome silicone gas rings to our troops,
Problem solved.

As the one piece ring expands with heat, there are no sharp tails to splay out and gouge the bolt carrier sealing bore,
And there isn't any way for dirt/grit/desert sand to migrate past the gaps in the rings and score up the bolt carrier sealing bore.
You won't find hard carbon built up between the tails like you do with standard 3 piece rings since there are no gaps, no hard carbon buildup gouging the carrier bore.

--------------------------------------------------------------

There is absolutely NOTHING wrong with music wire springs in standard production pistols since your life doesn't count on that spring daily,
But in a combat situation, or something you are setting up for law enforcement, military, home defense,
I strongly recommend you use Chrome Silicone springs in the slides, in the magazines, ect.

Chrome Silicone based springs are about 400 times (Cycles) more reliable than music springs,
The price is only slightly higher,
And this is one of the 'Combat Gunsmith' secrets that no one seems to know...

-------------------------------------------------------------

And just for the guys that think a Music Wire spring will live loaded for years...
I stumbled onto a loaded magazine from my military days stuffed into a box of crap at my mothers home when she passed away...
Baretta 92 mag loaded with military ammo, which I don't normally shoot, so I know it's been there since I lost it.

Looks like it had been loaded about 10 years or a little more,
When unloaded, the follower wouldn't reach back up to the top lips of the magazine anymore.

I also found several M-16 mags unloaded, still in the factory packaging, and the springs were all weak in them from nothing more than being in the mag body, unloaded, all those years.
Wouldn't reliably cycle in my AR's, but when the springs were swapped out for new springs, they worked fine.

If you are in doubt, get yourself about 4 or 5 mags, rotate them as you clean the firearm of your choice so the same mag doesn't stay loaded all the time...
Without a chrome silicone spring, I won't trust one to be loaded past about 90 days,

There is a reason why we only put 28 rounds in a 30 round mag, or 18 rounds in a 20 round mag in the 'Old' days,
The mag springs simply wouldn't take the full compression, and if the rifle jams in a fire fight, it's a lame, clumsy club. You would be better off with a 'Louisville Slugger' than a jammed side arm!
 
As the guys have pointed out,
'CLIPS', often called 'Stripper Clips' simply hold bullets for insertion into a MAGAZINE...

That magazine might be internal in the rifle, as with SKS, Mauser 98, ect.
Or it might be a detachable MAGAZINE, like with semi-automatic pistols or rifles.

I know we are nit-picking with saying 'SEMI' automatic and 'Magazines' instead of clips,
To say 'Firearms' instead of 'Guns', ect.
But there are people out there that would jump on ANY chance to limit ownership.
Correct terminology is the first step to education is to be specific so we don't wind up with a 'Gun Ban' trying to slip by congress instead of a 'High Capacity Magazine' ban...

Remember, the entire 'Black Talon' ban was stired up over one coroner's assistant being quoted as saying about a California workplace shooting,
"She was shot 11 times with 'Black Talons', She didn't have a chance."

The corner's assistant was firearms literate, he knew a Black Talon from a piece of cake,
And his point was the victim was shot 11 times, but it was twisted by the anti-gun media into a crusade against one of the best self defense rounds and hunting rounds ever built!

Now, not one word about the mental patient that was allowed to purchase a handgun out of his home state (Utah),
Not one word about the 3 months of threats and break-ins the guy had done without the police doing anything about it,
Not even the fact that the woman had called police and told them the guy was following her to work, and called again when she got to work, but police didn't respond.

Besides, 11 rounds into anyone would pretty much do the job, but the BULLETS were blamed!
Now I can't get the best penetration/stopping round every made simply because the media blamed the BULLETS that were used!

Loose lips sink ships...
Use the CORRECT terminology, put the emphasis on the BAD GUYS, show responsible, even tempered arguments even when the 'Anti-Gunners' get wild and out of control,
(Let THEM look like the raving lunatics in the sound bites!)

Stalking laws have come a long way,
Domestic violence threats and workplace threats are taken seriously now,
But you STILL have to be vigilant of what you say and do or the 'Sound Bite' might show up on 'CNN' or 'You Tube' at exactly the WRONG moment!

----------------------------------------------

Now, for your questions,

Most magazines use MUSIC WIRE springs, which DO COMPRESS over time, and they DO loose some of the spring tension every time they are compressed.
I can provide details since we have a dyno where I work for determining EXACTLY that very thing,
And we DO produce springs for industry and aircraft, which have SUPER tight tolerances in regards to cycle life...
(You REALLY don't want an air craft engine spring to quit mid flight!)

Since they have to be compressed and then you expect them to come back to full extension to push bullets up,
You have to think of 'Cycles Of Compression'.

Music wire springs DO LOOSE tension every single time they are compressed, so eventually they will NOT return to a point where they function with sufficient force to do the job you want them to.

We ran into this a lot in the 70's with racing engine valve springs.
Compression cycles in a 500 mile race at 7 to 10 thousand RPM, the music wire springs would fail to hold the valves shut against turbo or supercharged engines,

Turns out, music wire, no matter how good the grade, wasn't ever intended to be COMPRESSED!
Music wire was intended to be STRETCHED in a straight line and hold tension!

------------------------------------------------

What you need for proper compression in springs is a Chrome Silicone type steel.

Chrome Silicone has some 'Memory' for it's exact shape, and will cycle about 400,000 times longer and still function.

In the early parts of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, the M-9 (Baretta 92) wouldn't fire more than once or twice before it failed.
The problem was the music wire magazines had been in storage too long, and the spring wouldn't push the next bullet in the mag up fast enough.

We scrambled around here to make several hundred chrome silicone springs to replace the music wire springs and the pistols would then cycle again.

The military has since stopped issuing 'Chessman' magazines, and started refitting the mags with chrome silicone springs.

We DID NOT get the contract, although we shipped several thousand chrome silicone springs to the troops for free just to keep them in the fight while the military was 'Assessing' the 'Issue'...

(It's an 'Issue' when you are safe at home every night, and you are doing 'Studies' to see what's going on,
It's a PROBLEM, and a BIG ONE, if you are the troops getting shot at and can't return fire because the &^*% pistol won't function!)

----------------------------------------------

Same issue with the three gas rings on the M-16 bolt.
The 'Music Wire' those gas rings were made of open up in a horse shoe shape, tails gouge the bolt carrier sealing surface, and the rifle no longer functions reliably...
(Made by the lowest bidder!)

I sent several thousand (about 6,000 in all) one piece chrome silicone gas rings to our troops,
Problem solved.

As the one piece ring expands with heat, there are no sharp tails to splay out and gouge the bolt carrier sealing bore,
And there isn't any way for dirt/grit/desert sand to migrate past the gaps in the rings and score up the bolt carrier sealing bore.
You won't find hard carbon built up between the tails like you do with standard 3 piece rings since there are no gaps, no hard carbon buildup gouging the carrier bore.

--------------------------------------------------------------

There is absolutely NOTHING wrong with music wire springs in standard production pistols since your life doesn't count on that spring daily,
But in a combat situation, or something you are setting up for law enforcement, military, home defense,
I strongly recommend you use Chrome Silicone springs in the slides, in the magazines, ect.

Chrome Silicone based springs are about 400 times (Cycles) more reliable than music springs,
The price is only slightly higher,
And this is one of the 'Combat Gunsmith' secrets that no one seems to know...

-------------------------------------------------------------

And just for the guys that think a Music Wire spring will live loaded for years...
I stumbled onto a loaded magazine from my military days stuffed into a box of crap at my mothers home when she passed away...
Baretta 92 mag loaded with military ammo, which I don't normally shoot, so I know it's been there since I lost it.

Looks like it had been loaded about 10 years or a little more,
When unloaded, the follower wouldn't reach back up to the top lips of the magazine anymore.

I also found several M-16 mags unloaded, still in the factory packaging, and the springs were all weak in them from nothing more than being in the mag body, unloaded, all those years.
Wouldn't reliably cycle in my AR's, but when the springs were swapped out for new springs, they worked fine.

If you are in doubt, get yourself about 4 or 5 mags, rotate them as you clean the firearm of your choice so the same mag doesn't stay loaded all the time...
Without a chrome silicone spring, I won't trust one to be loaded past about 90 days,

There is a reason why we only put 28 rounds in a 30 round mag, or 18 rounds in a 20 round mag in the 'Old' days,
The mag springs simply wouldn't take the full compression, and if the rifle jams in a fire fight, it's a lame, clumsy club. You would be better off with a 'Louisville Slugger' than a jammed side arm!


Not nit pick or anything, but since you brought it up, you load "cartridges" into a magazine, not "bullets". A "bullet", along with the "case", "primer", and "powder charge" make up a loaded "cartridge".

For the record, "Beretta" is the firearms manufacturer, and "Baretta" is the television character. :wink:


baretta.jpg





gf
 
I don't believe it hurts the magazine at all either. I do make a practice of rotating the rounds on the weekends in the magazine of my carry gun just in case gun oil may have gotten to the top one. It just makes me feel better to know that I have a "fresh" round in place on a regular basis.
 
I read an article, in a gun magazine, that was written by an engineer at Wolff Springs. He said what wears out a spring is not being compressed or extended, but the constant up and down motion from loading and emptying the magazine. I have some magazines that are twenty years old and they still work fine.
 
Thanks for all the info, we had this discussion a few months ago at work...this puts the myth to rest as far as I can tell.
 
Hmmmmm. Also answers my question(s) on the matter.

Logic dictates the case of spring weakening, but design makes up for the "potential problem".... apparently.

I think I'll stick to my two loaded and one in a "rest" mode modus operandi. Rotated after my monthly shooting practice.

I've always gone under the assumption that if 20+ rounds can't resolve the situation..... I'm in deep kim chee anyway.

GG
 

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