Seecamp??


sar

New member
Can anyone tell me anything about a seecamp 380? Olease don't turn this thread into a commentary about caliber size, or the fact that you can conceal a 5" 1911 under shorts and a tshirt. I realize this, like my 1911 45's, etc. However there are times a tiny pocket gun would be nice. Does anyone have any experience with seecamp accuracy and reliability, as well as fit and finish. Also, how is seecamp as a company?
 

JC40

New member
I don`t personally own one,but the people i know that do own them swear by them.They are supposed to be the cadilacs of pocket carry and not that easy to obtain.I guess they aren`t mass manufactured like most other guns,but are worth the wait if you do get one.I can honestly say that i have never heard anything bad about them,but then again i`m no expert.
 

Red Hat

New member
I've always heard good things about them. Very well made and reliable. I'd like to have one in my collection.
 

benzuncle

New member
I use a .380 as my daily carry, but not a Seacamp. I'd love nothing less than a Sig P220; if only it would hide in my watch pocket! After a lot of research on caliber size I opted for what most critics said was the minimum caliber; the .380. Once that decision was made, I looked to the some of the brands out there: Kel-Tec, Seacamp, Beretta and North American Arms. After a lot of reading, mostly from owners of those brands, I chose the NAA Guardian .380. It is heavier than any of them, but not enough for me to care. I decided that weight wasn't the issue for this particular gun because it fits in my pocket nicely in a DeSantis Super Fly/Nemesis holster. I carry it every day, except where not allowed by law. It is reliable and I am accurate to about 30ft with 102gr. Remington Golden Sabre JHP's. After about 550 rounds, it settled in nicely; now the gun I bought for protection is a pure joy to shoot. The weight really pays off at the range. I put 200 rounds through it at the range last weekend. I only meant to shove a hundred through it but that other hundred beckoned. Ah, such is life. I've added Hogue Cocobolo grips for comfort; my only mod, and well worth it. (I've tried the photobucket thing on here but I haven't figured it out. I need "Photobucket for Dummies".) I've also gotten very comfortable shooting it one handed. And the other day I happened on an article in Guns & Ammo that said for the last 2 decades, the two-handed stance is the preferred way to shoot. It is great for paper targets that aren't shooting back but is not what you will come up against in the real world. So this trainer is recommending one-handed training first. The Seacamp: other than the price and availability, you probably won't hear a negative thing about it.
 

Unearthed

New member
I use a .380 as my daily carry, but not a Seacamp. I'd love nothing less than a Sig P220; if only it would hide in my watch pocket! After a lot of research on caliber size I opted for what most critics said was the minimum caliber; the .380. Once that decision was made, I looked to the some of the brands out there: Kel-Tec, Seacamp, Beretta and North American Arms. After a lot of reading, mostly from owners of those brands, I chose the NAA Guardian .380. It is heavier than any of them, but not enough for me to care. I decided that weight wasn't the issue for this particular gun because it fits in my pocket nicely in a DeSantis Super Fly/Nemesis holster. I carry it every day, except where not allowed by law. It is reliable and I am accurate to about 30ft with 102gr. Remington Golden Sabre JHP's. After about 550 rounds, it settled in nicely; now the gun I bought for protection is a pure joy to shoot. The weight really pays off at the range. I put 200 rounds through it at the range last weekend. I only meant to shove a hundred through it but that other hundred beckoned. Ah, such is life. I've added Hogue Cocobolo grips for comfort; my only mod, and well worth it. (I've tried the photobucket thing on here but I haven't figured it out. I need "Photobucket for Dummies".) I've also gotten very comfortable shooting it one handed. And the other day I happened on an article in Guns & Ammo that said for the last 2 decades, the two-handed stance is the preferred way to shoot. It is great for paper targets that aren't shooting back but is not what you will come up against in the real world. So this trainer is recommending one-handed training first. The Seacamp: other than the price and availability, you probably won't hear a negative thing about it.

Nice read....I may look into one or both of these.
 

ecocks

New member
As so many

...others are telling you, there isn't much conversation about them because there are not many around (it seems). The comments I remember from PDO were all good. Personally, I thought it was too small, but remember seeing that attachment which squares the gun and provides a laser aimer. Never understood the point in a short barrel laser light but hey...

As for .380, I note that even heavy caliber fanatics often comment that .380 or .38 snubbies are acceptable backups. That tells me that pretty much everyone agrees that they are "above the line" of an acceptable caliber. So, while I preferred .40 or 9mm, I have 2 .380's (Bersa and Sig) for "light" dress situations.

As for me, I figure that a defensive situation will most likely involve a robbery and, unlike combat, most robbers really don't expect to be shot and have to engage in a shoot-out. I believe that a robber is going to be focused on the reward while most of us are going to be focused on saving ourselves and family members. So, if you get one into him, it seems that is the point where you are emerging on top (at least most of the time) and marks where they begin to end their resistance. This should make your follow-up shots even more effective. That is the value of training for shot placement and maintaining tactical awareness. As so many people have noted, think about who you see at the range and in classes. Any guys look like they are brushing up on their mugging techniques? Anyone practicing aiming through the eyes in a ski mask? Firing through the pocket of their warm-up jacket or hoodie? Even if they were prepared to kill you, how many have really thought through the implications of an exchange of gunfire?

Has anyone seen any statistics regarding the likelihood of success against armed victims? Is it my imagination or doesn’t it seem like most of the incidents reporting armed resistance seem to resolve in favor of the victim. I only recall two incidents where CC people were put down with their guns drawn (Tyler, TX and Tacoma, WA). Both of those involved mental cases bent on committing homicide and long guns vs. handguns rather than robbery attempts.
 
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Ektarr

Dedicated Infidel
Read a great article years ago about a custom PPK/S done by Cylinder & Slide about a custom job they did. Always wanted to have mine done similarly.
 
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Magistrate PO

New member
Where are they?

I have heard about the seecamp guns for years, but have never actually seen one except in gun magazines. Never seen one at the gun shops, or the guns shows. Who ever has them must be keeping them. That must mean that they like them. Always looking for newer and better firearms.:D
 

firescout

New member
Seecamp shooting?

I'm now the proud owner of a seecamp 32. I'll post a report after shooting it.:D

Well... how do you like it?

I've always thought about getting a Seecamp; the .25 ACP one at first, then the .32 ACP Silvertip version when that came out. But it always seemed like it would be an ordeal to order and wait for one.
Lately, I've been considering a NAA Guardian .32 ACP. The Beretta Tomcat seems like a decent gun, but I've heard it's rather thick for its size.
 

Bit

New member
I've owned/carried my Seecamp .32 for 10 or 12 years now and I've been very pleased with it. Seecamps are hand made and the quality shows. The main reason I like this for CC is that it is tiny. I carry it in a pocket holster and it imprints like a wallet. I generally carry it in my back pocket and it has never been identified, even on 2 occasions when I was patted down entering an NFL stadium.

The Seecamp doesn't have any sights, but as it's designed for face-to-face confrontations, who needs sights. If you want, you can rotate it slightly sideways and sight down the groove. I have no problem putting all rounds into center mass at 20 feet. I will admit that it isn't very comfortable to shoot as it really pounds your hand.

Yes, .32 isn't a large or very powerful round, but it is more than enough to get the job done and because of its small size, you can carry it much easier and without a chance of it being seen.
 

roughneck266

New member
I own a small gunshop. We ordered a 32ACP LW Seecamp for a customer. Took around two months to come in, the qulity of that firearm is excellent. Have not shot one yet, but we ordered two of them so I still have another, thinking seriously of telling the Mrs I will be keeping the other one..
 

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