Scared myself with slipped gun hold while draw practice; what should I do now?


phillip69

New member
Quick summary of my situation before my issue. CHL going on 2 years. I have gone to .22 Colt Goldcup for marksmanship practice due to cost of bullets. Typically 15-20 minute sessions on home range avg probably 2 times a week. 50-100 rounds. Try to also practice draw from my OWB holster with timer and 8x11 paper targets at typically 20-30 feet for a magazine or two with EDC Glock 30S every other session or so.

So this week my grip on Glock SLIPPED and before I could get support hand fully engaged on gun, I discharged by mistake before fully raised up on target. Scared me; I looked back at what happened, although my support hand was never in front of the gun, it was not solidly placed and made me worry about that, and shooting by some sort of instinct instead of stopping and regrouping before being ON TARGET worried me too - how did THAT happen? Made me stop and think about what I was doing. I think I was so excited trying to beat the clock that I did not follow through properly.

I know I should dry fire draw practice more than I do (admit to only a few draws in maybe 1 session a week with unloaded gun); perhaps that is something I should begin more now?

I am posting here in hopes to hear what I should do different. I know I deserve harsh responses and I am ready to accept them.

Thank you.
 

apvbguy

New member
if you are training for SD situations you can try moving closer to the targets, 20-30 feet is way too far, try 10 to 15 feet. until you have the draw stroke perfected stop using the timer, speed is the last thing that is worked on after muscle memory and accurate shot placement
 

BC1

,
Grip the gun the same every time you draw. Finger off the trigger until the gun is rotated. Finger stays along frame as the gun is drawn. Forget using a timer... speed doesn't come from fast hands, it comes from reduction of unnecessary movement. Reducing unnecessary movement is achieved by practicing the draw stroke many hundreds, if not thousands of times. Work your practice sessions without live ammo. Use a snap cap and work the draw-stroke. Don't forget to practice re-holstering as well.
 

gfrlaser

New member
Don't overthink it is first. Repeat the drill, find and learn from your mistake. Then make changes others are suggesting, one at time. If you incorporate too many changes to any regimen, it throws off a myriad of steps you have already learned well.
 

OKLAGMCRUISER

New member
Shoot your support hand...you won't do it a second time...hehe...I kid...I kid.

Practice as already said at a slower rate until the muscle memory is gained and speed will improve with practice.
 

Rocketgeezer

New member
Be a bit more methodical, speed is cool but if you shoot a innocent or yourself, then its not, practice (a lot) with snap caps, get all your movements like second nature, speed will come, ...............however I honesty don't think in your average SD situation pulling and fireing your weapon in .08 seconds vs .06 seconds is really going to make a lot of diff, now remember I said average, there will always be something weird happen, where average go's out the door
 

phillip69

New member
Thanks for all the great suggestions. After over a year of practicing slow, methodical draws, I thought I had that down and so lately I have been trying to speed it up against the timer. I figured my 3-4sec clear shirt, draw, rise toward target with finger on side of gun, flip safety off near top (on target), finger on trigger next, aim fire, needed some major improvement. Guess it proves a year of 2-3 times a week, 10-20 draws each time, is not enough yet. Back to basics.

Thank you all.
 

Eidolon

Alter Kocker
Thanks for all the great suggestions. After over a year of practicing slow, methodical draws, I thought I had that down and so lately I have been trying to speed it up against the timer. I figured my 3-4sec clear shirt, draw, rise toward target with finger on side of gun, flip safety off near top (on target), finger on trigger next, aim fire, needed some major improvement. Guess it proves a year of 2-3 times a week, 10-20 draws each time, is not enough yet. Back to basics.

Thank you all.

I'd suggest staying on the basics.

I never try for a speed draw unless I'm actually training in a timed event. I practice my presentation by the numbers every day. When I go to the range I specifically do the four count draw and fire over and over again in addidtion to any other training I may be doing. I sit at home watching TV and change magazines again and again and again but I never do that stuff fast unless , as I said, I'm in a timed training event or a real fight.
 

RJT CCW

New member
Thanks for all the great suggestions. After over a year of practicing slow, methodical draws, I thought I had that down and so lately I have been trying to speed it up against the timer. I figured my 3-4sec clear shirt, draw, rise toward target with finger on side of gun, flip safety off near top (on target), finger on trigger next, aim fire, needed some major improvement. Guess it proves a year of 2-3 times a week, 10-20 draws each time, is not enough yet. Back to basics.

Thank you all.

Obviously you are placing your finger on the trigger before you are on target based on your ND when your hand slipped. Slow down and get back to practicing the basics. You have become lazy and created a shortcut (habit) by placing your finger in the trigger guard before you are on target and this one exception just proved it to you. Not being harsh on you, it happens to many of us if we are not careful.
 

Eidolon

Alter Kocker
Thanks for all the great suggestions. After over a year of practicing slow, methodical draws, I thought I had that down and so lately I have been trying to speed it up against the timer. I figured my 3-4sec clear shirt, draw, rise toward target with finger on side of gun, flip safety off near top (on target), finger on trigger next, aim fire, needed some major improvement. Guess it proves a year of 2-3 times a week, 10-20 draws each time, is not enough yet. Back to basics.

Thank you all.

Another thing I'd like to point out here is you don't want to give yourself a training scar. What I mean is this; as you walk your way through the 4 (or 5) counts of your draw if you make a mistake do not stop and start over. Correct the mistake and continue the sequence until your sights are on the target and you fire.

If you build the muscle memory of stopping and starting over again when you make a mistake in training that's exactly what you'll do if you make a mistake on the real world.
 

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