Reloads?


sdf2000

New member
Why do some hand guns say no reloads???
 

bplv

New member
From what I've read, glocks barrels don't do well with lead bullets, common in reloading to reduce price.
 

Red Hat

New member
From what I've read, glocks barrels don't do well with lead bullets, common in reloading to reduce price.
That depends on who is making the bullets. Bullet casters are making lead bullets now that won't lead the barrel and will hold up to magnum velocity. I use Linotype in my cast bullets and I guarantee they won't lead a barrel.
Linotype and Gas Checks = High Velocity rounds
 

DrDavidM

New member
I think it is like Redhat said, to cover them if you do something stupid. That way if you blow the gun up by putting twice the powder charge, they can say, we told you not to use reloads. Follow loading instructions and you won't have a problem.
 

RDW

New member
I'm sure that you have heard the expression " cover your a**"
This is just a form of CYA for the gun manufacturer. This way if something blows up in your face their corporate attorney can say " We told you "
 
one manufature I am familiar with that doesn't like reloads is GLOCK. In some ways, GLOCKs are great guns, in others, they are the pits.

When a cartridge is fired, the firing pin pushes the cartridg forward until it is stopped by either the chamber /throat junction, on a rimless case, or the rim on a rimmed case. Sometimes in a revolver chambered for a rimless case, the "moon clip" does the head spacing. When the cartridge fires, the case walls are forced to stick to the chamber walls, and the head of the case slams into the breec face, reseting the primer. The case actually stretches, then springs bac to it's original length as the pressure goes down,and in an auto loader, the action unlocks. It is then pulled from the chamber by the extractor. A couple of things happen here. If the brass is used a lot, the case doesn't spring back to it's original length, particularly with "hot " loads, and must be trimmed occaisionally, or else it will be too long, and cause insufficient headspace. This may causer a semiauto to not return to battery, or not return completely to battery, resulting in a cartridge going off not fully supported by the chamber. A "Kaboom"

Another thing that can happen, even if the case is trimmed correctly, is thinning aof the case above the web, the thick part above the head. There is a radius inside the case for strength, and just above this radius is where most stretchin occurs, because just below the radius, the case is very thick. Given enough firings, brass can get noticably thinner there. Sometimes you can bend a paper clip, and use it to "feel" the thin place. GLOCKs, as well as some other handguns, hve a chamber that does not fully support this very part of the case. Everthing is fine on factory ammo, but after one two, or ten firings, the unsupported case head can fail. "Kaboom".

Another factor is just plain human error. Read"stupidity". I am waiting on a new cylinder for my pre model 29 44 Smith and wesson magnum. I assume, and I really don't know, but i assume that i double charged a case with Unique, a fairly fast burning powder. ( .3 grains is a mild charge for the bullet I was using. 12 is about max. As near as I can tell, I must have cycled the progressive press incompletely, while learning how to use it, and doubled the charge in one cartridge. I notice one shot out of a cylinder full that was terrible in recoil. I thought i had slipped a 310 grain "bear hunting load" in with my target loads. The cylinder was bulged just enough at the end to prevent me from ejecting the case, although the others fell out. That mistake has cost me $140.00 so far, if I only need the cylinder. If I had been using max loads on Unique, I might have lost a hand, or more likely an eye. Undoubtably the cylinder would have burst instead of bulged. I have reloaded all my own ammo for over twenty five years. I only takes one little slip, or one little mistake on new equiptment, and you could be injured very badly, or ruin a barrel, cylinder, slide, frame, etc.
This is one of the primary reasons that i favor a revolver. I don't know anyone who can afford the amount of ammo it takes to get really good at shooting without reloading. It is also a reason, one of many, that i traded off the only GLOCK I ever bought. Don't get me wrong, GLOCKs and other similar handguns are great if you are an occaisonal shooter, but they are not for the real shootist. Course, I they weren't O. K. for you, you would already know all this, and I wouldn't have to tell you.
 
I've fired many reloads through my Glocks. The problem with firing reloads through ANY firearm is mainly when the brass gets reloaded too many times. Every time you fire the brass, it expands and the walls get a little thinner. I reload brass 3 or 4 times before retiring it. Specifically with the Glock pistol, the issue is with lead bullets. The lead fouls up the hexogonal rifling which causes excessive pressures and can lead to serious injury or death should the firearm malfunction. If you do shoot reloads through a Glock, be sure the bullets are "jacketed" as in "JHP", "FMJ", "TMJ", etc.

Best thing to do is to read the manufacturer's warnings and follow the instructions that came with your firearm. Check with knowledgeable shooters and see what they're doing. I've seen many competition shooters who shoot THOUSANDS of reloads a month. Many of them have some version of Glock, and have NEVER had any injuries due to reloads.

Happy shooting, be safe!



gf
 

LVLouisCyphre

Obama is a mack daddy!
Simple, warranty and liability reasons. A firearm manufacturer has no way to know the quality of your loads. However if the issue occurs because of faulty ammunition from a major ammunition maker, you can sue them or at least get them to replace the ruined firearm. It's very easy to make a mistake in reloading that will be costly. If you're careful and the reloads you're using conform to SAAMI specifications with quality components, an armorer or gunsmith factory trained or otherwise will have no way to tell if you ever put reloads through the firearm.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
Pretty much what the others said. If someone doesn't know what they're doing, the rounds that they reload could do some serious damage. That's why in all the years I've shot rounds at the range, I've never shot reloads. The only reloads I would EVER shoot are those done by me (when I get around to learning :smile:).
 

maybejim

Maybejim
Pretty much what the others said. If someone doesn't know what they're doing, the rounds that they reload could do some serious damage. That's why in all the years I've shot rounds at the range, I've never shot reloads. The only reloads I would EVER shoot are those done by me (when I get around to learning :smile:).

I was at a Cowboy Action Shoot and because I had been careless and grabbed some boxes of .45 ACP instead of the .45 Colt, I ran out of ammo before the shoot was over. I tried to buy some but one of the guys insisted on giving me a box of his reloads. Unfortunately I had a squib round (probably had no powder, just the primer) and the bullet got stuck in the barrel. :nono:

Luckily for me, my gun, and the bystanders, the timer and counters standing by me recognized it (I did not) and stopped me before I could fire another round. :stop:We had to drive the bullet out with a stick with no damage but it could have been bad had I fired another shot.
 

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