Ok...there I was...


festus

God Bless Our Troops!!!
How many times have you heard someone start off with "there I was"? How credible is the person? How credible is the advice? How credible is the scenario? This is why I spent almost 21 years in the military. I believe we have a responsibility to our fellow shooters to prepare them and to educate them in the things that will matter most in a SHTF situation. It is not about cool gear or what kind of ammo or how much is put away for tomorrow, but ultimately how smart you are, and how solid is your decision making process.
There are a lot of goofballs out there with gear and gadgets but ZERO skill.

I challenge you to practice ONE survival skill this weekend and let every one know what and how and how good or bad it was. It could be something as simple as making fire in the BBQ with out using matches or pitching a cool tent with your kids for some backyard camping. Don't laugh, these are important skills best honed at home and not in the rough.
 

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boris

New member
good plan...

i never did get that pancho raft down. a buddy and me in high school had this idea to build a raft t get to the other side of the lake . it was working until we got on. some of our stuff sank. thankfully, we had aback up plan and extra gear and we hiked to our campsite. me and the kids do that backyard camping from time to time. that is a good way to test some gear ad stuff . i also like to use my survival vest to do stuff out of it as well. NOW is the time to do and learn, not in the middle of a SHTF , real life situation. i can tell you that i need to work on my fire building skills. i seem to be able to build one on the ground in high wind an wet weather, but can't seem to get a good one going in the bbq grill......:mad:
 

mom of 3 angels

New member
My husband and kids dug a snow cave in the pile of snow in the front yard the other day and he asked if any of them wanted to sleep in it (apparently he did this as a teen). Our 3 year old was the only one that wanted to. Had to call off the campout due to parents common sense. Maybe when they're bigger . . .

Will try something out this weekend, not sure what, but it won't be sleeping in a snow cave!
 
Just ONE survival skill. Ah, I was setting aside this weekend to practice a few skills I have not done in a while. I need to work on my hand drill fire. My bow drilling is great but my technique while doing a hand drill fire start are fairly week. I need to practice since I will be demonstrating both methods in a few months. I also need to do some flaking and make a few slate or obsidian knifes. Since we are stuck in snow, I want to try an in snow fire, since that is rather challenging to get a working. We will see what I actually get done...
 

mom of 3 angels

New member
Okay whip, you can come to my house and start a fire for me!

Here's what happened this weekend at our place. I will say straight out that lighting fires is NOT a skill I have developed. I usually defer the fire making to someone in my party with skill at it (like my husband). IF everything is dry and I have a match (or ten) I MIGHT be able to get one going. So I thought I'd have a little fun with the kids and light a fire this weekend. It has snowed like crazy here this winter, but the last week or so has warmed up in the afternoons so now we have lots of snow and mud. So I took my fire lighting gear outside and tried to get a fire going. Well, like I said, I have a hard time when things are dry. We tried to light one on the snow, but couldn't keep it going for anything, so moved over to the mud to try again, but after about an hour and a half and lots of smoke and very few flames we decided it was time to put snow on the tiny flame that we did get burning and go in and have hot cocoa instead.

I tried to light some things I have never tried before. Things that someone heard somewhere would light well.
Very unimpressed with cotton balls and dryer lint, neither of which improved much with the addition of petroleum jelly on them.
Rolls of cardboard dipped in wax lit okay, but didn't burn long enough to catch fire to anything else this weekend. And they're bulky for the amount of burn you get from them.
Tried to use the magnesium and steel to catch fire to anything, but got tired of that real fast and ended up using a lighter. Now, I have in the past started a small fire with flint and steel and after the mag/steel experience I decided I really need some char cloth that will hold an ember if I'm going to use that method. And maybe some shredded hemp rope as that took the char cloth ember and made flame fast.
Talked with my mom about all the fun I had and she said she's been making fire starters with dryer lint pressed into the pressed paper type egg cartons, then pouring wax over them. She tears them apart and has little fire balls. She went out and lit one while on the phone with me and it burned quite a while and she said nothing was left of it but a small amount of ashes.

I am totally open to suggestions and ideas, and I obviously need to practice more--I would have died of hypothermia before I got warmed up if I were really stuck out in the cold this weekend! By the way, thanks for the challenge even though I'm almost too embarrassed to report how bad I am at lighting a fire, sometimes it takes something like that to get me going on something! :)
 
If you double up on your dryer sheets (I use Snuggle) :) the dryer lint seems to light faster. Another option would be to use a 9V battery and fine steel wool. Touch the battery terminals to the steel wool, (use a small piece at first). The battery will short out very quickly and the steel wool will begin to burn. Don't use "SOS" or anything other than pure steel wool. Touching a lighter or match to the steel wool will ignite it as well. When I really need a fire and stuff is as damp as it can get here in Hawaii, I use a road flare. It's not very heavy, yet burns hot and for a fairly long time (usually 15 minutes or so). That's plenty of time to dry up any damp kindling and get a nice steady fire going. A last option (due to the fact that it's my least favorite) would be to use small rubber bands or thin strips of bicycle inner tube. It stinks very badly, but burns well in damp conditions, and burns rather long.

I'm not a big fan of petroleum jelly, much less would like to be carrying the stuff in my pack, so I found other ways of getting a fire started.

Good luck in your fire building.



gf
 

boris

New member
"hey, boss...i got a plan..."

i am thinking about a flamethrower.:rolleyes::eek: good effort, people. o, how about setting up that tent that has been sitting in the corner of the garage unopenend fr 6-7 years? what is fun for me is going out into theboonies and seeing how many improvised shelters i can build or come up with.:cool:
 

HK4U

New member
Bow Drill

Just ONE survival skill. Ah, I was setting aside this weekend to practice a few skills I have not done in a while. I need to work on my hand drill fire. My bow drilling is great but my technique while doing a hand drill fire start are fairly week. I need to practice since I will be demonstrating both methods in a few months. I also need to do some flaking and make a few slate or obsidian knifes. Since we are stuck in snow, I want to try an in snow fire, since that is rather challenging to get a working. We will see what I actually get done...

After trying to start a fire a couple different times with a bow and drill I decided to keep plenty of matches and lighters on hand.
 

festus

God Bless Our Troops!!!
Battle Dammage Repair!!!!!

I ended up using a very useful survival skill this last weekend. Squirrels had chewed up the electrical and vacuum systems in my work car. I had to patch her up just to get to work. A new wiring harness and volvo hoses aint cheap, so I made do by splicing hoses using stainless steel tubing and joining wire using butt crimps. Every thing works but it ai'nt pretty. Good survival skill though. I could not have hade more damage if somebody put a round into her. I used alot of the Aircraft Battle Damage Repair skills (ABDR) I was taught in the USAF. Saved over a grand in repairs at the dealership.
 

boris

New member
Scotty..... I mean

Festus, nowthat you are finished playin' around, we need the warp drive up and running!!!:D
 
Fire lightin is a hard thing to do. It certainly take patience and time. It took me 10 minutes to get a good ball of lite kindling. Bow drill still works the best for me. Two pieces of dry light wood, a round dowl or stick, a bow stick, and a shoelace. The bow and lace wrap around once on the dowl stick. One piece of dry wood on bottom one on top. You work the bow back and forth to round off all edges. Then you take a knife and pit out a place for the dowl to rest on both pieces of dry wood. One piece sits flat on the ground. The other piece you support with your hand the dowl sits in between. Work the dowl with the bow back and forth until you have a smooth rounded surface on the two pieces of wood and on both ends of the wood. You then take your knife and notch out rounded hole that sits on the ground so that part of the rounded pit is open to the air. You put the kindling whether it be dryer lint or in my case torn up newspaper and hay. (All I had around the place at the time). Here is a secret. Once you are at this point take your hand and rub your natural oils over the end of the dowl that sits under the wood on top under your hand. This keeps this side from smoking and forces all the friction you can to work on the bottom piece. Then you bow back and forth for about 5 minutes or so until you start getting the piece of wood smoking like crazy. The skill comes in figuring out when to slow the drill down by half when it gets hot enough. A deduction in speed and increase in force on the very hot and smoking wood causes embers to fall into the kindling. The hardest part for me and most, is getting those small tiny little glowing embers to light the kindling. It takes very hard blowing getting the embers bigger and bigger until they will cach and ignite. It is not a quick process and takes some time. But, fun to learn if you have the patience. I tried the hand drill this weekend, but my fumbly fingers can't get it going as fast as the bow drill. Sometime I will take photos of all this stuff and post it or something. But thats a general idea of the process.
 

HK4U

New member
Bow Drill

Fire lightin is a hard thing to do. It certainly take patience and time. It took me 10 minutes to get a good ball of lite kindling. Bow drill still works the best for me. Two pieces of dry light wood, a round dowl or stick, a bow stick, and a shoelace. The bow and lace wrap around once on the dowl stick. One piece of dry wood on bottom one on top. You work the bow back and forth to round off all edges. Then you take a knife and pit out a place for the dowl to rest on both pieces of dry wood. One piece sits flat on the ground. The other piece you support with your hand the dowl sits in between. Work the dowl with the bow back and forth until you have a smooth rounded surface on the two pieces of wood and on both ends of the wood. You then take your knife and notch out rounded hole that sits on the ground so that part of the rounded pit is open to the air. You put the kindling whether it be dryer lint or in my case torn up newspaper and hay. (All I had around the place at the time). Here is a secret. Once you are at this point take your hand and rub your natural oils over the end of the dowl that sits under the wood on top under your hand. This keeps this side from smoking and forces all the friction you can to work on the bottom piece. Then you bow back and forth for about 5 minutes or so until you start getting the piece of wood smoking like crazy. The skill comes in figuring out when to slow the drill down by half when it gets hot enough. A deduction in speed and increase in force on the very hot and smoking wood causes embers to fall into the kindling. The hardest part for me and most, is getting those small tiny little glowing embers to light the kindling. It takes very hard blowing getting the embers bigger and bigger until they will cach and ignite. It is not a quick process and takes some time. But, fun to learn if you have the patience. I tried the hand drill this weekend, but my fumbly fingers can't get it going as fast as the bow drill. Sometime I will take photos of all this stuff and post it or something. But thats a general idea of the process.


I may give it another try one weekend to see if I can get the hang of it.
 

MufDady

New member
Surviving is making it through another day, without falling for me, But as a Marine vet survival skillls are things everyone needs............. Semper Fi'
 
Speaking of survival skills. I live in an area in Northern Utah that is due for the BIG EARTHQUAKE. We have not had a quake for years so, its assumed and predicted that one could hit and hit hard. This morning I was a bit slow on getting ready for the day and decided to crash on my bed for an hour to recoupe from a long night working on a project. I was awakened to my bed shifting ever so slightly back and forth as if someone was pushing on it. Of course my first natural inclination was that someone was in the room, but I quickly shifted to it being an earthquake. I figured it my be a pretremor to a ensuing bigger quake which I have seen happen in more faulty areas. Quickly I was in my shoes with bug out bag already on and heading down the stairs to get out of this tall building. The shifting stopped about halfway down the stairs but I decided to get my bag into the car just in case. It turned out to be a rather large quake in Nevada hundreds of miles away. However, it was a good test of my personal emergency broadcast system. The interesting thing to me was the lack of notice from anyone else in the building. A few noticed and kicked into survival mode, but a great deal did not even give it a second thought. These skills are not hard, granted I am not an expert on everything or anything. But, I think basic situational awareness goes a long way into keeping one safe. Anywho, just another test of my nerves :confused:
 

Hoplites1234

New member
Whip, I'm going after that bow fire this weekend when I go out to the range. Don't know how long I'll keep at it as I'll have my new Bushmaster and scope with me and that might be a bit more fun to play with.:D
 
Good Luck...It takes patience. I'm sure I know what I would be doing at the range with that nice setup, and I'm sure it would not be firemaking. Unless your getting rid of some old gas cans :) Happy Bush Whacking!!!
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
I ended up using a very useful survival skill this last weekend. Squirrels had chewed up the electrical and vacuum systems in my work car.
As soon as you have a chance, you can use another survival skill, which involves a .22 rifle and a bird feeder full of corn. That will probably prevent further engine patch jobs - and as an added bonus, you can eat squirrel for a whole week. :)
 

Leon P

New member
Firemaking skills are critical to your outdoor survival

Being able to make a fire under emergency situations can save your life. And not being able to make a fire can cost your life! Most of my outdoors activities involve snow, cold and remote places, so I'm really concerned about the most effective, and quick ways to get that flame going.
A few years back, I did extensive research on what firemaking method is the best under all circumstances. If you'd like to read the story, check out:
Link Removed
All of us, obviously, believe a firearm is a necessary survival tool. But you can't use any tool if your fingers are numb and you're about to freeze to death!
 

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