Need to Notify????


Leader

New member
Is there anyplace on the net that has a list of the states that require you to notify police you have a permit & are armed when stopped.
I will be taking a trip soon through 7 states & would like to find the info in one place rather then go to each states home page & try to find the gun laws there.

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Added by lukem

http://www.usacarry.com/concealed_carry_permit_information.html

There is a section "Informing Law Enforcement of Carry" on each state's information. The ones blank are the one I could not find any info on and are the same ones other sites have blank.
 

Last edited by a moderator:

HowardCohodas

New member
Let's see. I've just been stopped by LE. Let me think... What state am I driving in today? Do I have to declare? All this stress and I'm able to remember the rules here. Unlikely

When we train we learn techniques to take care of possible firearm faults. Methods have been developed to cover the most situations and require minimum analysis under stress.

Therefore, for me, I'm always going to turn on the interior lights, have my hands on the steering wheel, declare my CCW and my armed status. One method to cover all situations.
 

rmarcustrucker

New member
Therefore, for me, I'm always going to turn on the interior lights, have my hands on the steering wheel, declare my CCW and my armed status. One method to cover all situations.


+1

Besides the moment LEO asks "are you carrying any weapons, needels....." you've got to answer him.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Here is our Texas Page which lists:

Informing Law Enforcement of Carry:
If a license holder is carrying a handgun on or about the license holder's person when a magistrate or a peace officer demands that the license holder display identification, the license holder shall display both the license holder's driver's license or identification certificate issued by the department and the license holder's handgun license. A person who fails or refuses to display the license and identification as required by this subsection is subject to suspension of the person's license as provided by Section 411.187.

So basically if the LEO asks for your ID, go ahead and give him both.
 

Red Hat

New member
If I get stopped I'll just hand them my DL and CWP and let them do the asking. I've done that a two DUI check points and they looked at them and handed them back and said have a nice day.
 
I know we have to by law here in Utah. Just in case your passing through. But IMHO its better just to get it out front anyways. Shows a bit of trust and respect on your behalf.
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
  1. When you get stopped, immediately pull over safely. The best thing is to pull into a parking lot, and under a shelter if it's raining. A dry cop is a happy cop.
  2. Turn your dome light on.
  3. Roll your windows down (unless it's raining) and put your arm on the door, with your hand visible.
  4. Turn the car off.
  5. Give them everything at once. Why not do this? There's no reason not to. Most cops will understand, and if you do all of the previous steps, they'll realize you're not a threat. I have a thing that holds my registration and proof of insurance together, and I just give them that. My CWP and DL are also in the same spot in my wallet. I can get them all together and ready to go before I even pull over.
  6. Greet the officer politely and give them the information.
  7. Wait a while, whatever...then be on your way. Thank them and leave.

Keep your car clean, don't act suspicious, don't give them a hard time and you'll be fine. Be a model citizen all the way, and if they do anything wrong then it's undeniably all their fault and you can go for a lawsuit.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
Is there anyplace on the net that has a list of the states that require you to notify police you have a permit & are armed when stopped.
I will be taking a trip soon through 7 states & would like to find the info in one place rather then go to each states home page & try to find the gun laws there.

Sounds like laziness to me. If you're not sure whether or not you have to declare for a particular state, just go to the pages of the states that you don't know this information for and make note of the notification requirement (or lack thereof). So what if you have to go state by state; at least you'll know. Besides, when doing research on anything, this is typically something you'll have to do anyway. I know if I'm a teacher or professor and a student of mine refuses to research something because all the info they need is not contained in one source, that would tell me that they are lazy. Don't be lazy.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Why is everyone linking to other sites for this information when it is right here on USA Carry? There is a section "Informing Law Enforcement of Carry" on each state's information. The ones blank are the one I could not find any info on and are the same ones no one else mentioned if you have to notify or not.

Concealed Firearm Permit Information - USA Carry
 
If you go to: Handgunlaw.us and look at the "U.S. Off Limits" sections it shows whether you must notify but you have to check each state. A nice data base set-up with basic info of this type would be a great thing (hint). :smile:
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
If you go to: Handgunlaw.us and look at the "U.S. Off Limits" sections it shows whether you must notify but you have to check each state. A nice data base set-up with basic info of this type would be a great thing (hint). :smile:

I'm working on putting this stuff in the database but as I said in my post above, that same exact information is on USA Carry, so I don't see the need to get it from another site. Their information isn't in a database, it is just listed in a PDF which is a file you have to download and open. Mine is just listed on a webpage which you just load in your browser and read.

And if you don't have Adobe Acrobat installed then you have to go download and install it just to view the information on that site. You don't need anything installed to view the information on USA Carry.
 
I'm working on putting this stuff in the database but as I said in my post above, that same exact information is on USA Carry, so I don't see the need to get it from another site.

Tried the link given for "Concealed Firearm Permit Information - USA Carry" and it is much easier to use. Luke, as always, your doing an outstanding job. Thanks for the hard work.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
I'm working on putting this stuff in the database but as I said in my post above, that same exact information is on USA Carry, so I don't see the need to get it from another site. Their information isn't in a database, it is just listed in a PDF which is a file you have to download and open. Mine is just listed on a webpage which you just load in your browser and read.

And if you don't have Adobe Acrobat installed then you have to go download and install it just to view the information on that site. You don't need anything installed to view the information on USA Carry.

I like it just the way you have it, Luke. Furthermore, you're making improvements all the time. Keep up the good work!
 

rayven

New member
+1

Besides the moment LEO asks "are you carrying any weapons, needels....." you've got to answer him.

Actually, that is incorrect in some states, depending on their firearms laws. Unless specifically stated otherwise, you have the right to not ever speak to a LEO. If you are pulled over for whatever reason, you are required to show the documentation (license, registration, insurance), but you never have to say a word.

If you don't answer the question, you can't lie to the LEO.

I know this is true in my home state, but learn the laws in your own. IANAL!!!

In practice however, you are better off talking to the LEO and either changing the subject or answering him honestly. Whatever you do, DO NOT LIE TO A LEO.
 

Lonewolf2810

Glock 27 Fan
Actually, that is incorrect in some states, depending on their firearms laws. Unless specifically stated otherwise, you have the right to not ever speak to a LEO. If you are pulled over for whatever reason, you are required to show the documentation (license, registration, insurance), but you never have to say a word.

If you don't answer the question, you can't lie to the LEO.

I know this is true in my home state, but learn the laws in your own. IANAL!!!

In practice however, you are better off talking to the LEO and either changing the subject or answering him honestly. Whatever you do, DO NOT LIE TO A LEO.

Well this will only throw fuel on the fire the way I see it. If the LEO ask you a ? and you refuse to reply that gives him resonalbe doubt and he can rip you a new one. Why would you not want to inform them in the first place if you haven't done anything wrong? Just my 2 cents worth, because I was told when in CCW class to always show my permit.
 

rayven

New member
Well this will only throw fuel on the fire the way I see it. If the LEO ask you a ? and you refuse to reply that gives him resonalbe doubt and he can rip you a new one. Why would you not want to inform them in the first place if you haven't done anything wrong?

According to the law in all states, refusal to talk to a police officer does not give him probable cause to pursue the case further. If a LEO asks me a question that I feel is inappropriate, illegal, or personal, I just won't answer it as I am legally entitled to do.

The question isn't whether or not you have done anything wrong or not, but the fact that police are trained to word things in a way to implicate yourself in a crime whether you are guilty or not, and then what you say WILL be used against you. The less you tell a cop, the less chance you have of being convicted. Ask any lawyer whether you should voluntarily speak to a cop.

In my opinion, the police should deal with the matter at hand only unless circumstances prove otherwise. If I'm driving and speeding, get my driving info and give me a ticket. It doesn't matter where I'm going, why I'm going so fast, and whether or not I have a firearm with me.

I just don't think the police should have the right to personal information that is aside from the current circumstance.


Just my 2 cents worth, because I was told when in CCW class to always show my permit.

In practice, for most people it eliminates the possibility of surprise, and cops hate surprises. But in my experience, police are not generally friendly to the gun-carrying public, so if you don't answer the question, they can't be negative about it. And if they are, they risk state and federal lawsuits.

But draw your own conclusion and do what you think is right and necessary for the situation. Everyone should make the choice on their own. I am just tired of the "papers please!" mentality of law enforcement lately.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
According to the law in all states, refusal to talk to a police officer does not give him probable cause to pursue the case further. If a LEO asks me a question that I feel is inappropriate, illegal, or personal, I just won't answer it as I am legally entitled to do.

The question isn't whether or not you have done anything wrong or not, but the fact that police are trained to word things in a way to implicate yourself in a crime whether you are guilty or not, and then what you say WILL be used against you. The less you tell a cop, the less chance you have of being convicted. Ask any lawyer whether you should voluntarily speak to a cop.

In my opinion, the police should deal with the matter at hand only unless circumstances prove otherwise. If I'm driving and speeding, get my driving info and give me a ticket. It doesn't matter where I'm going, why I'm going so fast, and whether or not I have a firearm with me.

I just don't think the police should have the right to personal information that is aside from the current circumstance.




In practice, for most people it eliminates the possibility of surprise, and cops hate surprises. But in my experience, police are not generally friendly to the gun-carrying public, so if you don't answer the question, they can't be negative about it. And if they are, they risk state and federal lawsuits.

But draw your own conclusion and do what you think is right and necessary for the situation. Everyone should make the choice on their own. I am just tired of the "papers please!" mentality of law enforcement lately.

In most states that require notification, the cop pulling you over will know before approaching the vehicle whether you're a permit holder anyway, so refusing to tell him won't make much of a difference either way. I would just cooperate and not piss him off; it just makes things a heck of a lot easier on yourself.
 

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