Microstamping - Yea or Ney?


Your Opinion On Microstamping

  • Yea

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • Ney

    Votes: 148 99.3%

  • Total voters
    149
a few thoughts:

- The company that "invented" the technology is introducing legislation in EVERY state in an attempt to make their profitable technology mandatory.

- It will be ridiculously expensive to buid a database for all of this info.

- This micro stamping is easily defeatable with a barrel and/or pin swap and indeed through normal use of the firearm, micro-stamping on the firing pin will wear away.

That is called conflict of interest and is illegal, so why don't they just arrest him, and maybe he can micro-stamp his way out of incarceration.
 

How are they going to micro stamp the brick that I bash your head in with, or the 2 x 4 that you are clubbed with. This is all more gun control. They know that an outright ban isn't possible, they do it one simple law at a time.
Mija
 
How are they going to micro stamp the brick that I bash your head in with, or the 2 x 4 that you are clubbed with. This is all more gun control. They know that an outright ban isn't possible, they do it one simple law at a time.
Mija

You ask simple questions. I'm still waiting on the answer to how they're gonna manage to micro stamp #7.5 birdshot! :lol:



gf
 
How did ANYONE on this forum vote Yes for this? Did JWTollet or IheartTed sneak back in?
 
'Just another example of hoplophobic 'feel good' nonsense. "...SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED!" This isn't about 'solving crimes'... this is about denial of an actual Civil Right. The people who think this stuff up have a short between the headset. :wacko:
 
That would be a big NEY. Much like the firearms database (the expended round in new guns) it would fail miserably. The chances of stolen rounds being traced back to you is highly possible and the amount of money required to start-up and maintain a tracking system would be outrageous especially under the current national financial situation. With current techniques in place this requirement is definitely not required.
 
Every so often a new buzzword strikes a chord with the anti-gunners, and the one they're pushing now is microstamping.

Microstamping itself isn't new, it was developed over a decade ago. But now, those seeking new avenues to restrict gun rights are turning to it as a means to accomplish their goals.

Microstamping is a patented process of engraving a serial number on the tip of a firing pin. When it functions properly, the number is stamped onto the primer of a cartridge when it is fired. Gun control advocates claim this will lead to making it easier to solve gun crimes and restrict gun trafficking. They don't mind the myriad flaws with the technology, only that it will help to discourage law abiding gun owners and drive up the costs associated with firearms ownership.

Naturally, the biggest problem with tracing a cartridge back to the gun that fired it, something that can already be accomplished by forensic science, is that it would only lead back to the last registered owner. Even if it is as reliable as claimed (which has not been proven), if that gun is stolen or lost, tracing the spent ammunition will lead to a dead end. Since most guns used in crimes are stolen, they would be no more traceable after microstamping than they are now.

Another drawback is the ease with which the system can be foiled by a criminal. Firing pins can be swapped out, numbers can be filed off, and spent brass can be collected at a firing range and planted at the scene of a crime. The simplest way to beat the system would be to use a revolver, which retains the spent casings.

As a new technology that is unproven, millions of dollars will need to be spent on research and testing. Not to mention that the patent is held by just one company, who would effectively have a monopoly. Both factors would combine to cause a surge in the price of firearms and ammunition, which fits right in with the goals of the gun grabbers by making both out of the price range of as many people as possible.

Guns manufactured before the implementation of the program would present even more issues. If exempt, the program would be even more worthless for the stated goal of solving crimes, though the side benefits of rising prices would still be there. Another option would be to mandate that non-stamped firing pins be replaced, a costly and nearly unenforceable edict. Of course, if the gun banners were to get their way, these noncomplying guns would just be confiscated and destroyed.

These are just a few of the arguments against implementing such a policy, but since anti-gun activists have never seen a piece of gun control legislation they didn't like they are not being swayed from pushing such programs on an unsuspecting public

Source: Link Removed
 
Microstamping itself isn't new, it was developed over a decade ago.

As far as I know, only one company has claimed they can do it and it has never been demonstrated to actually work.

tracing a cartridge back to the gun that fired it, something that can already be accomplished by forensic science,

My understanding is that that can not be done. If you have the gun and you have the cartridge, they can be matched. But the system is not developed that can store the cartridge information and match it with one found at a crime scene. New Jersey I believe has mandated a cartridge data bank and last I heard not a single case had been solved by it.

Guns manufactured before the implementation of the program would present even more issues. If exempt, the program would be even more worthless for the stated goal of solving crimes,

Heck, there's only 250 to 400 million of those out there. Guns are rarely good for more than 100 to 200 years so those will be phased out in nothing flat. Of course places like Kalifornia let guns be grandfathered in when they pass one of their unconstitutional "gun control" laws except the gun can't be sold or inherited in the state.

but since anti-gun activists have never seen a piece of gun control legislation they didn't like they are not being swayed from pushing such programs on an unsuspecting public

Their plan is to keep adding stupidities until no one can afford a gun or the license for it or the ammo or the hoops they have to jump through.
 

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