lubricating Guns


JohnLM

New member
I would like to know what is considered "lightly lubricate"?? I have been cleaning and lubricating my weapons. What I do is put a light dab of oil on a swatch and wipe the metal parts. When I went to the range the clerk checked my weapons for me and he said I had over lubricated. How do you guys do it?? Thanks for your input.
 

Ghost Rider

New member
Are you doing this on the out side of the gun ?, if so you might be over lubricating it a little. What i do is take an old rag that i have and just spray it with a light mist of WD 40 and wipe my gun down on the out side when im done cleaning it, ive been doing it that way for years and it works good for me.
 

JohnLM

New member
Are you doing this on the out side of the gun ?, if so you might be over lubricating it a little. What i do is take an old rag that i have and just spray it with a light mist of WD 40 and wipe my gun down on the out side when im done cleaning it, ive been doing it that way for years and it works good for me.
No, I'm speaking of the internal parts
 

Ghost Rider

New member
No, I'm speaking of the internal parts

Ok, what i do on the inside is put a drop of oil on the parts that move and spread it out with my finger, and on the areas that show normal contact wear i will also put a little oil on these areas as well and spread it around a little. You don`t need to use a lot of oil, a little goes a long ways. Excesive oiling will pick up dust and cause fouling from powder residue while shooting.
 

Iam2Taz

New member
The answer depends on the gun...
My Walther, aka Tupperware type. I put a "small" amount of FP-10 on the moving parts. On my 1911, a bigger drop on parts that grate against each other. That "small" amount on the moving internals.
I run my AR wet. It functions better that way. Quite a few "drops" on the moving parts of it.

Clean with CLP or Ed's RED if you know how to make it.

Then, as noted above, I will give a quick wipe over the outside with a rag that has some lubricant sprayed on it. Very lightly.
 

Dennis1209

New member
Ditto on the internals. I've always used Pledge furniture polish on the external. Never had an rust and it doesn't collect any dust and no oily residue.
 

willyNH

New member
WD40 is NOT a lubricant!

WD stands for water displacement. It does a fantastic job for a lot of tasks, but gun lube is not one of them. I clean and lube with CLP, but any gun lube is better than wd40.

-Matt
 

Ghost Rider

New member
WD40 is NOT a lubricant!

WD stands for water displacement. It does a fantastic job for a lot of tasks, but gun lube is not one of them. I clean and lube with CLP, but any gun lube is better than wd40.

-Matt

I never said i used WD 40 as a lube, i said i wipe down my guns with it when im done cleaning them.
 

jg1967

New member
What gun are you using? There are usually some pretty helpful diagrams of lube points you can download.
 

Usa007

New member
Rem Oil is the only lube i use besides inox Grease for my BCG on my AR-15, i have found this rem oil to work for me and have also been told that most 3 in 1 household oils can be used as well but when i tried it on my AR i saw the oil dissolved rather quickly and didnt really lube much. I will stick With Rem Oil.

THERE HAS TO BE A REASON REM OIL IS SOLD AT VIRTUALLY EVERY GUN STORE>>>>>>>>>>>>
 

Jes

New member
Gun lube is a highly personal choice for most people. Do a little experimentation and see what you like. I have heard great things about some of the high end bicycle lubes.

I personally like Marvel Mystery Oil. It is good for cleaning off carbon fouling and I mix it 50/50 with synthetic 5W30 for an all-around lube. About $8 for a lifetime supply.
 

-06

New member
According to the arm. I lube my rails before shooting as well as pivot points like the hammer/trigger/sear/and barrel bushing/lock. Same for rifles. I run a clean patch through the bores, wipe the bolt faces, and feed ramps. On operating rods with rollers or slide areas I give them a little extra. Try never to have oil that you can "feel" or wipe off with your finger. When storing I give them a great coating of Rusty Duck, Remoil, CLP, or something similiar on all moving parts and in the bore. I store them upside down to keep excess oil out of the stock. Really am ashamed for allowing my old 742 carbine to get rusty. It got some moisture in a horizontal storage hidey hole and made a mess. Have it soaking in oil and have most of the rust off. Will have to re-blue--well will probably get it Parkerized and redo the stock/forearm. I like that dull finish on shooters.
 

Rocketgeezer

New member
WD-40 works great as a cleaner, but its not a lube, best to blow with air after cleaning, and use a good oil or gun grease
 

Swinokur

New member
Glocks-drop of FP10 where manual instructs

1911-TW25 grease on rails. FP 10on the other areas.

Smith 10 series-drop of FP 10 on the rails

As stated, a little goes a long way.
 
J

JSDinTexas

Guest
As we see here, there are lots of choices. I stick with a standard light gun oil because in TX I'm not faced with extreme temperatures, although it's 103 degrees today. On my Colt AR I use CLP.
One thing I might throw in is on my Glocks that require "6 drops of oil only," I use a Q-tip soaked in oil and 'paint' it on the appropriate surfaces.
 

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