Left on passenger seat with windows down.


Poetical1

New member
By no means do I intend to pass judgment, nor criticize; here is what I witnessed yesterday at a funeral.
The husband of the deceased, who is a combat Marine veteran and a retired police officer from a major metropolitan area, exited his car with a firearm on the passenger side seat both windows down and walked away to greet the family. (car was out of his line of sight for many minutes) Luckily another family member noticed brought to his attention before anything went bad. But his demeanor was very nonchalant and that bugged me.
I've never lost a spouse, but am I overreacting?
 

Fallschirmjäger

New member
...but am I overreacting?
Probably not. His reaction though, was probably the result of trying to deflect blame from himself by pretending that it was no big deal. I've seen it often where something potentially very dangerous might of happened but didn't; instead of accepting how serious the situation was, it was laughed off.


It's a defensive mechanism intended to keep himself from having to accept responsibility.
 

XD40scinNC

New member
Gun, purse, wallet, phone, laptop, etc., etc., on plain view/window down is an invitation for a snatch and run opportunity for any punk that happens to notice. In any of the above, seriously lacking any situational awareness.
 
Over reacting?

You saw someone make an error in judgement and correct it. Store the information in your head, and try not to make a similar safety error yourself. It is over; move on.

Your do not say how far he was from the car or the types of people near it. I will guess that it was friends, family, and other mourners. There probably was no need to make a fast dash to the car to keep the gun out of the hands of a passing gang member or a 6 year old relative. It was not the same as leaving the car on the seat or in a parking lot with numerous unknown people passing by. It was still an error in judgement on his part.

If he drove with the gun on the seat, I think that it was probably unsafe. Things on the passenger seat tend to fly off I one has to brake hard. I make it a habit to always lock my car, gun or no gun.

Anyone who has been around guns and people has seen unsafe practices. If we are honest most will admit they have done some themselves.
 

Poetical1

New member
Over reacting?

You saw someone make an error in judgement and correct it. Store the information in your head, and try not to make a similar safety error yourself. It is over; move on.

Your do not say how far he was from the car or the types of people near it. I will guess that it was friends, family, and other mourners. There probably was no need to make a fast dash to the car to keep the gun out of the hands of a passing gang member or a 6 year old relative. It was not the same as leaving the car on the seat or in a parking lot with numerous unknown people passing by. It was still an error in judgement on his part.

If he drove with the gun on the seat, I think that it was probably unsafe. Things on the passenger seat tend to fly off I one has to brake hard. I make it a habit to always lock my car, gun or no gun.

Anyone who has been around guns and people has seen unsafe practices. If we are honest most will admit they have done some themselves.
The church where this happened is on a residential block. It was a warm sunny day so aside from the mourners there were other people milling around. A good portion of which were family and friends. The city has had many issues with gun violence over the last year or two of which has had a lot of national media coverage. The neighborhood in question by some considered rough. This instance could well have caused another illegal gun on the street and in the wrong hands. He was at least half a block away from the car. Thankfully it turned out well, but I can't help to wonder how many times has this happened where has not turned out well?
 
Thanks for the additional information. It was certainly unwise and dangerous on his part. As you indicated in your OP, his grieving status may compromised his thought process and alertness. Let it go. There is no need to waste emotional energy on something over which you have no control; what could have happened or may happen.

Your post is a good reminder to be aware of our emotional state, surroundings, and the safety of ourselves and others especially when carrying a gun.
 

vernsimpson

New member
People handle grief differently. I would give him the benefit of he was not himself and not thinking at the time. Granted he should not have done that. But nothing bad happened so move on. I expect he knew that was not good and will not do that again!
 

Poetical1

New member
Well, what was your reaction? Without knowing how you reacted to your observation, we can't answer that question.

Sent from my E6782 using USA Carry mobile app
I stood in disbelief. I didn't know what to say, even if words had came to me, I am sure my delivery would have been harsh.
I cannot quote the specific code, but I'd bet it's against I'll. state concealed carry act.
 

Gregmm6

New member
I stood in disbelief. I didn't know what to say, even if words had came to me, I am sure my delivery would have been harsh.
I cannot quote the specific code, but I'd bet it's against I'll. state concealed carry act.

Then no, you didn't overreact. It seems that you barely reacted at all.

Sent from my E6782 using USA Carry mobile app
 

Fallschirmjäger

New member
Was there a law being violated?

Depends greatly on where it occurred. As of a few years ago, 27 states had some sort of gun storage law. Generally they fall into three categories:

1) Laws that mandate gun storage. Laws that require adults to secure them if there is any chance a minor could get possession of it without permission.
2) Laws that make it a crime to leave a gun unsecured if a minor gets possession and injures or kills him/herself or others.
3) Laws that allow a firearm owner to be held civilly liable for injuries caused by a minor who obtains an unsecured gun and uses it to cause injury.
 

Papasan173

New member
It doesn't matter what type of people were nearby. Part of being a RESPONSIBLE gun owner is making sure no one can get to your weapon to use it on you, or anyone else nearby. If someone had taken it and killed someone two weeks later he would share some of the blame.
 

Fallschirmjäger

New member
Would he 'share some of the blame' if it were a baseball bat that was stolen and used to bash in the head of a 90 year old spinster?
Would he 'share some of the blame' if someone had stolen the car and while joy riding caused a fatal accident?

Morality and legality aren't always the same thing.
 

NavyLCDR

New member
Would he 'share some of the blame' if it were a baseball bat that was stolen and used to bash in the head of a 90 year old spinster?
Would he 'share some of the blame' if someone had stolen the car and while joy riding caused a fatal accident?

Morality and legality aren't always the same thing.

+1. What if a teenager takes the keys to the second family car while mom and dad are gone somehwere, goes joy riding and kills someone. Are the parent responsible for leaving the keys in the basket by the door?
 

Poetical1

New member
+1. What if a teenager takes the keys to the second family car while mom and dad are gone somehwere, goes joy riding and kills someone. Are the parent responsible for leaving the keys in the basket by the door?
In many states parents/ guardians can be held financially and otherwise liable for their minor's actions.
 

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