Is the Colt Commander REALLY the best Pistol?


Edvon

Edvon
Is The Colt Commander really the best combination of reliablity and accuracy? please give some feedback im considering buying one.
 

HK4U

New member
Opinions are one of two things we all have and I am no exception. My opinion, single action autos were great in their day but the double action or double action only auto is a much better, more modern weapon. Just as the Luger was a good weapon in its day but no where as good as a modern HK or Sig etc. I feel the same about the 1911. Again I know a lot of others will disagree with me on this so as the saying goes "what ever floats your boat".
 

mdemichael2

New member
I am currently carrying a gun no longer in production. It is a Star Firestar and I also carry a compact single stack Para Ordnance about the size of a Colt Commander.Both guns are reliable and accurate for their intended use:Self Defense. I also own Glocks,carry what fits you best. I'm sure that if ever used in self defense the criminal is not going to know if he was shot with a century old design or a more modern pistol.Try out a Commander or one of the newer designs at your local shooting range if rental models are available and choose the one you like best.
 

hardballer

New member
One of my favorite guns is the Colt Commander. I have a 70 series in satin nickle. It functions flawlessly and at 10 yards is more accurate than any pistol I have ever shot. What I like about the Colt is cocked and locked carry. Always ready. Single action. Light, smooth trigger pull every time. The Commander is a little lighter than the Government model but not enough to care.

Other guns might be more hi-tech or have a finer fit or finish but invariably, they are all just guns. The Colt has history, Almost a hundred years in production, relatively unchanged. Wielded by heroes. Must be a pretty good piece to have lasted this long. It is the most copied and by far the most produced gun in the world. Pulling in a far second might be the Beretta 92.

Fewer parts, I can field strip mine without tools in less than a minute. I can take the whole gun apart without tools. Parts are varied and plentiful and inexpensive. Mags are plentiful. Ammo is plentiful. I've carried both my AMT Hardballer and the Colt as a backup. Granted, eight pounds but eight pounds of 45ACP reassurance.

Over all, a very easy gun to work on, modify or repair. May cost a bit more up front but it will be worth every penny.

Bottom line is that any quality gun is better than no gun.

This is mine.

coltcrkt.jpg


19114.jpg


Most internal and external parts have been replaced with Wilson Combat and Ed Brown.
 

NDS

New member
I carried a Commander for years and would have quickly answered 'Yes' in the past. Many people are more comfortable with the double action autos that have become common. A carry gun is too personal a choice to force the 'one size fits all' idea upon people.


BTW--a few years back I replaced the Commander as my primary carry, a Kimber Ultra CDP now has that place. It's still a 1911 design in .45 ACP but it's even smaller and much lighter than the Commander.

(To be honest, the KelTec PF-9 is often what I carry these days due to its small size and light weight; I consider the 9mm to have acceptable stopping power)
 

infntrysuicdekng

New member
the 1911 design is unaltered since 1910 if that doesnt say quality almost every moden pistol has a base in the 1911 design. the commander is not different i have RIA 1911 with a 3.5 in barrel i think that transfers to the colt officer. it shoots absolutly fine and is more accurate than to be expected.
 
I'm a huge 1911 fan, in any size - but my personal opinion is that while Colts are nice, they're over-priced.

There are no shortages of less expensive, equal or greater quality, performance and reliability in the 1911 line.

IMHO. I'm not a Colt-hater... but the NAME seems to command price. (Also true in the AR family.)

Rock Island, the STI Spartan, the Taurus P1911, Springfield Armory, SIG, S&W... the options are bountiful & legitimate. IMHO.
 

s2harry

New member
To answere your question the Commander is the best combination to alot of people. But they are not YOU. Are you a shooter or beginer? Do you like autos or revolvers. If you like the Commander then get one. There is nothing wrong with them. Each type of gun has its good points. Buy what you like and learn to use it properly. More important for your auto is can you clear a jam fast and ready the gun for another shot. Sometimes auto loaders don't auto load. If you find a gun ( auto or revolver) that you like you use it it's best way. In cse you dont know> A single action auto like the Commander is carried Cocked, On Safe, with a round in the chamber. A double action auto would need to be carried Hammer down, safety Off and a round in the chamber. It needs to be shot double action for the first shot for speed. After that it is in single action mode as the slide cocks the hammer for the next shot. A revolver is carried fully loaded also and shot double action for speed. You would need to practice double action shooting for self defense. You could cock the hammer for single shots taken from cover for accuracy if needed. You and only you can determin what you want to do with the gun. Im not so partial to aluminum guns for weight savings. If I'm going to carry a gun I want it to shoot the most powerfull round I can shoot well. To me that does not say aluminum but thats me.The Commander has an aluminum frame. The Combat Commander has a steel frame. You have to find out which gun your talking about. A gun carried for self defense is used most of the time at distances from arms length to 20 feet. At 20 feet you can head shoot with a stock Commander. At closer range you can shoot from the hip if necessarry and you may have to. A stock Commander will outshoot most people and it has good balance, it holds sufficient rounds for a first encounter(always carry a reload or two). You need to practice and practice and practice with your chosen gun. When you know what your talking about then you will know if you like it.
 

Jim_Macklin

New member
I believe it was Col. Jeff Cooper who said the double-action auto-pistol was an answer to a non-question, or something like that.

A true double-action auto-pistol will be the same long pull for every shot. The double-action first shot followed by a single-action until you stop shooting and apply the safety [dropping the hammer] is a more difficult hand skill to learn than thumb the safety off, fire, thumb the safety on.

Good sights and a good trigger are the fundamentals of easy and good shooting. Good sight and trigger are often standard now on 1911s, easy to fix if you've an old gun.
 

mdemichael2

New member
As I stated in an earlier post I have a Para Ordnance similar in size to a commander.Recoil wise mine is closer to the combat commander as it is a steal frame.You should go out and rent what guns you are interested in at your local indoor range or if your friends have the models you might like go to your local range with them and try out several guns. That way you can get a feel for them and make your choice on what fits you best and how well you handle the heavier calibers.Also remember with all steel frames you carry more weight and cheap holsters for concealed don't get it.Your firearm has a tendency to lean away from your body and print under your clothing.
 

Ryan H

New member
There are plenty of firearms that are just as reliable and accurate as a 1911 is, and many which are just as robust in design. That being said, give me my 1911 any day of the week!! :man_in_love:
 

SCfromNY

New member
I like the way the 4" 1911 feels in my hand and it is as accurate as my 5" at any distance I wold be concerned about. That said I only carry about 5% of the time. I am not confident that when the SHF I will remember the safety.

Two things form shooting USPSA and IDPA:
I do forget the safety sometimes
After the buzzer the transition from DA to SA is pretty seemless
 

hardballer

New member
practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice,

I think both Col. Jeff Cooper and Clint Smith both may have said this before. Forget the safety?!? Dead guy.
 

hardballer

New member
Get a Ruger GP100. No safety there. If you can't pick up your firearm wide awake and remember the safety, what will you do when it's three in the morning and you fall out of bed because you're so damn tired you can hardly walk. In my case, the 1911 which I have owned for some 12 years, and practiced with almost daily, is gripped tightly in my hand, the safety is off and my index finger is straight across the trigger guard till I engage a target.

How 'bout you?
 

s2harry

New member
Edvon, Ill assume you've bought a gun by now. Maybe you have not. We're all interested in your success and we of course like to blab about guns and give advice. So whats going on you buy a commander? Your question about it being the best. The Idea they are the best comes from the shorter barrel it carrys nice and is not so short you cant aim it. The 4 inch barrel does not recoil to much and some people me included think it is the best handling 1911 pistol. They are accurate but that is subjective to the task. Who can define accuracy? In the 70s I had a stock one that would shoot 4 inches at 50 feet. That was my best with it. You can accurize a stock one but now they do better than that. Colt tightened them up. Let us know whats happening.....
 

1911 Headbanger

Leave Me Alone!!!
In my L/E Days I carried a full size 1911 for most of my career. There were times when I carried a Commander, and it was great too. Only 3/4" difference in the guns. I carried lightweight framed Officers ACP's and Commanders while off-duty. Even though the L/E days are gone now, I still believe the Lightweight Commander type pistols are the ultimate carry guns. I have several Colts, Kimber CDP's and Para Ordnance LTC's. Along with their matching little brothers in the Officers ACP framed guns.

I guess about the only time I do not carry one is when I take a road trip far from home. In that case I carry a Glock for the extra capacity. I was stuck away from home during the 9-11 attacks, with a 38 snubby and 2 speed strips, wishing I had a full size service gun with lots of ammo. Therefore, I now carry a G17 or 21 and 4 or 5 extra mags in my Bug Out Bag when I travel over a hundred miles from the house, along with a G19 or G30 for concealed carry since the ammo and mags will interchange if needed. I personally love the Commanders in steel or alloy frames. But, you need to carry what you are totally comfortable with and shoot the best.
 

HK4U

New member
I believe it was Col. Jeff Cooper who said the double-action auto-pistol was an answer to a non-question, or something like that.

A true double-action auto-pistol will be the same long pull for every shot. The double-action first shot followed by a single-action until you stop shooting and apply the safety [dropping the hammer] is a more difficult hand skill to learn than thumb the safety off, fire, thumb the safety on.

Good sights and a good trigger are the fundamentals of easy and good shooting. Good sight and trigger are often standard now on 1911s, easy to fix if you've an old gun.

I liked Col Cooper and have a couple of his books. He was quite knowledgeable and contributed a lot to shooting however I disagree with his views on a couple of things. One being that a single action auto is better than a DBL/single action or DBL action only auto and the second that the Weaver stance is better than the isosceles. To each his own I guess.
 

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