Idaho CCW Training Question


vbilly

New member
I am currently a NV resident but will more then likely be moving to Idaho in the next 6 months or so (Kootenai Co to be specific).

I am curious about the training requirement that they have for the CCW in ID.

I have a NV CCW permit, have taken the required NV CCW courses as well as 5 or 6 additional, non-required courses including multiple courses at FrontSite in NV.

Would this meet the requirement or do classes have to be taken in ID?

Would be great if I can just show them proof of these classes and get the permit ASAP...though I guess I understand if they want me to take a class from an ID instructor.

Thanks!
 

Apply to the Sheriff. You can fill out application and do everything right there. You must have your Photo ID and proof of Ptraining. Some Sheriff’s offices provide the training. Check with your local Sheriff.

Cost is $20.00 by law and the Permit/License is valid for 5 years.
Material costs, Fingerprint and Background check fees can be added.

18-3302. Issuance Of Licenses To Carry Concealed Weapons.

(1) The sheriff of a county, on behalf of the state of Idaho, shall, within ninety (90) days after the filing of an application by any person who is not disqualified from possessing or receiving a firearm under state or federal law, issue a license to the person to carry a weapon concealed on his person within this state. For licenses issued before July 1, 2006, a license shall be valid for four (4) years from the date of issue. For licenses issued on or after July 1, 2006, a license shall be valid for five (5) years from the date of issue. The citizen’s constitutional right to bear arms shall not be denied to him, unless he:
(a) Is ineligible to own, possess or receive a firearm under the provisions of state or federal law; or
(b) Is formally charged with a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one (1) year; or
(c) Has been adjudicated guilty in any court of a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one (1) year; or
(d) Is a fugitive from justice; or
(e) Is an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, or narcotic drug, or any other controlled substance as defined in 21 U.S.C. 802; or
(f) Is currently suffering or has been adjudicated as follows, based on substantial evidence:
(i) Lacking mental capacity as defined in section 18-210, Idaho Code; or
(ii) Mentally ill as defined in section 66-317, Idaho Code; or
(iii) Gravely disabled as defined in section 66-317, Idaho Code; or
(iv) An incapacitated person as defined in section 15-5-101(a), Idaho Code; or
(g) Is or has been discharged from the armed forces under dishonorable conditions; or
(h) Is or has been adjudicated guilty of or received a withheld judgment or suspended sentence for one (1) or more crimes of violence constituting a misdemeanor, unless three (3) years has elapsed since disposition or pardon has occurred prior to the date on which the application is submitted; or
(i) Has had entry of a withheld judgment for a criminal offense which would disqualify him from obtaining a concealed weapon license; or
(j) Is an alien illegally in the United States; or
(k) Is a person who having been a citizen of the United States, has renounced his or her citizenship; or
(l) Is under twenty-one (21) years of age; or
(m) Is free on bond or personal recognizance pending trial, appeal or sentencing for a crime which would disqualify him from obtaining a concealed weapon license; or
(n) Is subject to a protection order issued under chapter 63, title 39, Idaho Code, that restrains the person from harassing, stalking or threatening an intimate partner of the person or child of the intimate partner or person, or engaging in other conduct that would place an intimate partner in reasonable fear of bodily injury to the partner or child. The license application shall be in triplicate, in a form to be prescribed by the director of the Idaho state police, and shall ask the name, address, description and signature of the licensee, date of birth, social security number, military status, and the driver’s license number or state identification card number of the licensee if used for identification in applying for the license. The application shall indicate that provision of the social
security number is optional.
 
There is no formal training requirement in Idaho. All it says is you must show that you have a familiarity with guns. This can be anything from military service, being a member of a shooting club, a letter of recommendation from someone the sheriff knows, to a formal class. Your Nevada permit should be quite sufficient. YOU WILL LIKE IDAHO!!!:pleasantry: Also there is no live fire requirement as in Nevada.
 
That is how I read it but thanks for the clarification (exactly what I was looking for)!!!

I don't mind the live fire that NV has, I always pass with no problems as it's not that hard. In some ways it is comforting to also know that if someone can legally carry that they at least know how to use the gun at a basic level.

My biggest problem with it is that it is a PITA. Buy a new gun, pay a licensed instructor to watch you shoot. Take the paperwork to the CCW office, pay them to add the weapon to the CCW, etc. Just takes more time then I usually want to spend and adds $40 or $50 to the cost of every gun as you know I am putting them all on the CCW.

Since ID has no registration, and since ID has no live fire requirement does that mean that the CCW allows you to carry any weapon (legal) concealed?

Like in NV if I buy a new gun I can't start carrying until I do the live fire, turn in the paperwork and get my new permit listing that firearm, (about 30 days). But it sounds like in ID the CCW covers all of your handguns (i.e. walk out of the store, stick it in a holster and you are legally covered by your CCW), is that true?

Thanks!
 
One thing to know about the Panhandle. We are right next to Washington which does not recognize Idaho's permit. However, Idaho does recognize Washington's.


You can certainly get a permit in both states but you really only need the one from Washington for this area (as was explained to me by the Kootenai Sheriff's office). If you plan to carry in Spokane Valley or Spokane as well as Idaho, apply for a non-resident Washington permit. It runs about $60 and is good for 5 years, and no formal training is required. You can get it at the Spokane Valley PD or Spokane PD. This way you can carry across the border.


Idaho actually accepts permits from all other states so your Nevada permit allows you to carry, unless it is voided by you becoming a resident of Idaho. I don't know about that. Unfortunately Washington accepts permits from very few other states, hence the need to get theirs.


Either the Washington or Idaho permit allows any number of handguns to be concealed without the need for them to be separately listed.
 
Although it may not be necessary, I think you should always have a permit of your residency. If you got a Washington permit you might be OK in Idaho, but there are states that honor only resident permits or if they honor a non resident permit still expect you to have a permit from where you live. Not having a resident permit makes it appear you might be disqualified for some reason in your home state. My recommendation would be to get an Idaho permit then supplement it with a Utah permit. That would cover you in Washington then convert your Nevada to a non resident. That would give you Max coverage for this part of the country as well as many other parts of the country.

Good Luck!!!
 
Although it may not be necessary, I think you should always have a permit of your residency. If you got a Washington permit you might be OK in Idaho, but there are states that honor only resident permits or if they honor a non resident permit still expect you to have a permit from where you live. Not having a resident permit makes it appear you might be disqualified for some reason in your home state. My recommendation would be to get an Idaho permit then supplement it with a Utah permit. That would cover you in Washington then convert your Nevada to a non resident. That would give you Max coverage for this part of the country as well as many other parts of the country.

Good Luck!!!



Sure you could get a Utah permit, but just for Northern Idaho most people don't have them up here. Perhaps that makes more sense for folks down south. Just informing about how most people in the Panhandle do it the fastest and with least expense.




Having a Washington non-resident is perfectly legal (as much as Utah permit!) and covers you in both states, as well as Montana which are the three states that we drive in most of the time.
 
training requirements in ID

When I got my Idaho permit in 1996, I listed hunter safety and having had a permit in another state (which required no training) and that was accepted.

I'd get the ID resident permit since it'll get you reciprocity w/ CO and WY should you travel to those states. Adding the non-resident WA or UT permit would be a good way to go.
 
vbilly,


Like in NV if I buy a new gun I can't start carrying until I do the live fire, turn in the paperwork and get my new permit listing that firearm, (about 30 days). But it sounds like in ID the CCW covers all of your handguns (i.e. walk out of the store, stick it in a holster and you are legally covered by your CCW), is that true?

Yes, in Idaho you're legal with any handgun you carry, unlike NV where you must get "certified" for each one you carry and have t listed on our CCW. Also, your Idaho CCW isn't valid in NV, so you'll want to make sure you can keep a valid NV CCW if you plan to travel there or a ccw from a state that has reciprocity wth NV.
 
vbilly,

I am a fellow Panhanlder and opted to get my Idaho as well as my Washnington permits. Kootenai County SO was painless and I got the permit in about three weeks...my renewal is coming up soon and I will update the post if that timeline has grown longer. For Washington, Spokane Valley PD no longer handles the permits as indicated above, so you will need to journey in to downtown Spokane to apply.
 
This info is off the Kootenai Co Sheriff's website.

Concealed Weapons Permits

(Click here for details of the Idaho Concealed Weapon laws, Section 18-3302 A-C

Kootenai County Sheriffs Department is open to the public Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.


APPLYING FOR AN INITIAL CONCEALED WEAPONS PERMIT (CWP)



* Concealed weapons applications are available at the Kootenai County Sheriffs Department.

* CCW fingerprinting is done on Wednesdays and Fridays only

between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

* You must provide appropriate identification, eg. drivers license with current address, as well as proof of firearms training. This may include: Certificate from a hunter safety course.


Military discharge papers (DD2 14) or active military I.D. Completion of a firearms safety course taught by a state or NRA certified instructor.
Law enforcement firearms training.

* A fee of $62 (cash only) is paid at the time of fingerprinting.

* It may take up to 90 days to process applications and complete criminal history checks. Approved applicants are notified by mail when to return for their permit to be issued. They are valid for five (5) years from date of issue.
RENEWING YOUR CONCEALED WEAPONS PERMIT

* You must complete a concealed weapons application and present your CCW permit.

Make sure Driver's License has your current address.
(Click here for a link to Idaho Change of Address Request).

* You can renew any time during the ninety (90) day period before the expiration date for a $25 fee payable in cash only. Renewals done more than 90 days after the expiration date are subject to a $10 late fee.

* Allow a minimum of 30 days for your renewal to be processed. Approved renewal applicants are notified by mail. Renewal licenses are valid for (5) years from the previous expiration date.

You will have to provide specific information on your Concealed Weapon Permit application. If you would like to be prepared, review this sample application for the information you will need.
 
as far as training, hunter's ed worked for me. Boise even sent me a copy of my card (they have records back to 1980). Latah Co. Sheriff took about two weeks to approve me.
 
While I live in eastern Washington and have a Washington cpl I would also like to get an Idaho permit. The question is if the Sheriff in Sandpoint offers the required class as it is my understanding that some of the Sheriffs in Idaho offer a class that fufills the requirements. The next question is if Oregon would accept the class(if offered) for its requirements. I think that it is a good idea to obtain permits from adjacent states if possible and the Idaho permit is accepted in many states.
 
Idaho requires proof of firearm safety training. This can be proof of hunter safety training, NRA Basic Pistol class or any handgun safety class taught by an NRA instructor.
In order to get an Oregon CCW you need to be a resident of a neighboring state (Idaho qualifies) and demonstrate a need to an Oregon sheriff. The trick in Oregon for obtaining a non-resident permit is finding a sheriff that will issue a permit to a non-resident. Sheriff Palmer in Grant County recognizes self defense as a legitimate reason. If you can show that you have received firearms safety training and are willing to make the drive to Canyon City OR to apply in person, you should be able to get an Oregon permit.

I hope this helps.
 
Although I have never found anything in the Idaho statutes requiring that you apply for your Idaho CCW in person, most, if not all, of the sheriff's departments require you to. Kootenai County, where we live, also requires that you pick up your permit in person once it is approved. Idaho does recognize CCW permits from all other states so, if you are not a resident of Idaho and have a CCW permit from your home state, or any other state, there really isn't any need to apply for an Idaho permit. Just remember that, if you carry in our state you must follow Idaho's laws. I hope this helps.
 
Just make it easy on yourself and take the Utah Concealed Carry class. It's good in a bunch of states, including Idaho.

Also, some more requirements for living in Idaho not listed previously:

1. No Californians (if you're from California, remove your license plates immediately and never tell--you think I'm joking, but I'm not).

2. You must hunt or be supportive of those who hunt.

3.Leave all the big-city bling behind you--you will be made fun of mercilessly if you have spinner rims, gold chains, designer clothes, or the like.

4.You may be of any political party, and as educated and cultured as you wish, but common sense reigns supreme.

5. Learn to drive slower, and with more space between vehicles. Especially in the winter.

6. If you reveal you are from a warmer climate, you must never, ever ***** about the snow. We get a LOT of it. It's cold, it's wet, it sucks to be stuck in (and you will get stuck in it), but if foreigners complain about it, we usher them to the county line and tell 'em to git on back home.

7. Hermits who live off the grid, grow their own food, and come to town once a week are the norm, not the exception. Learn to appreciate them, because they're the ones who will pull you out of the ditch.


8. Don't tell your friends back home how great it is here. We like to keep that our little secret.

9. You may open carry here. Expect to get some weird looks if you're in a bigger city (and here, a "bigger" city is 10K and above).

10. In most instances you will be judged by the quality of your character. No one much cares what kind of car you drive, or how big your house is, but they will remember if you were honest.
 
localgirl:243707 said:
Just make it easy on yourself and take the Utah Concealed Carry class. It's good in a bunch of states, including Idaho.

Also, some more requirements for living in Idaho not listed previously:

1. No Californians (if you're from California, remove your license plates immediately and never tell--you think I'm joking, but I'm not).

2. You must hunt or be supportive of those who hunt.

3.Leave all the big-city bling behind you--you will be made fun of mercilessly if you have spinner rims, gold chains, designer clothes, or the like.

4.You may be of any political party, and as educated and cultured as you wish, but common sense reigns supreme.

5. Learn to drive slower, and with more space between vehicles. Especially in the winter.

6. If you reveal you are from a warmer climate, you must never, ever ***** about the snow. We get a LOT of it. It's cold, it's wet, it sucks to be stuck in (and you will get stuck in it), but if foreigners complain about it, we usher them to the county line and tell 'em to git on back home.

7. Hermits who live off the grid, grow their own food, and come to town once a week are the norm, not the exception. Learn to appreciate them, because they're the ones who will pull you out of the ditch.


8. Don't tell your friends back home how great it is here. We like to keep that our little secret.

9. You may open carry here. Expect to get some weird looks if you're in a bigger city (and here, a "bigger" city is 10K and above).

10. In most instances you will be judged by the quality of your character. No one much cares what kind of car you drive, or how big your house is, but they will remember if you were honest.

You forgot to mention that potatos are King up there.
 

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