Gun Selection guidance needed pleas.


Camodude

"Self Defense in OK"
My wife and I are new to concealed carry. We need some help selecting a weapon to carry.
Here's some things I currently think are relevant:
-- I will be the primary carrier. The wife will carry only when she is traveling by herself to visit family.
-- I plan to use 9mm to save on cost. (We both will need some significant practice time and training at the range.)
-- I think I want a sub compact to ensure its comfortable so we'll carry it most of the time.
-- I'm currently thinking Glock 26 with Pearce magazine grip extenders. Any other accessories?
-- What is Glock-itis?
-- Any holster recommendations would be appreciated.
-- Recommendation of any specifics on 9mm ammo would be appreciated as well.

I know all of you on this forum have much more experience in concealed carry than I do. Please fell free provide any guidance that you think we should consider!

Best wishes and thanks in advance!
 

My advice is to go to a dealer which has a firing range. Most with ranges have handguns that they will rent. Test out a few to decide what works best rather than make a decision based on advice received in forums. Work with the dealer to determine the best weapon and holster combination, then repeat the entire process at another dealer in order to get a 2nd opinion. Then once you've determined the best handgun, and holster for your needs, make the purchase where you can get the best deal. Just remember, part of the "deal" is the level of service that you received from the dealer. If you don't have a range in your area, get more than just a few opinions from a forum. Talk to people who actually own the firearm/s you are interested in. Take your time, and get it right the first time.
 
My advice is to go to a dealer which has a firing range. Most with ranges have handguns that they will rent. Test out a few to decide what works best rather than make a decision based on advice received in forums. Work with the dealer to determine the best weapon and holster combination, then repeat the entire process at another dealer in order to get a 2nd opinion. Then once you've determined the best handgun, and holster for your needs, make the purchase where you can get the best deal. Just remember, part of the "deal" is the level of service that you received from the dealer. If you don't have a range in your area, get more than just a few opinions from a forum. Talk to people who actually own the firearm/s you are interested in. Take your time, and get it right the first time.


While Greg's post is on the money, I am partial to the Glock 26!:biggrin:
 
You may also have to look at 2 different guns, what the wife likes and what you like may not be the same. Have fun with it, shoot as many guns as you can, and don't rush into anything.

Chuck
 
I get this type of question a lot in my firearms classes. First of all, being that you're new to CC and being that you and your wife haven't fired a Glock 26 much (if at all), I'd strongly recommend getting out there and shooting one. As others have advised, find a range that rents firearms. Fire different loads and see what it's like. I would not recommend a Glock 26 or any sub-compact firearm to any inexperienced shooters. Keep in mind that the 9mm Luger round comes in various weight bullets, giving you various options.

I'd recommend trying different firearms of various calibers to see what works best for you. If you're dead set on getting a Glock in 9mm, I'd recommend a Glock 19. This firearm gives you the versatility of having an easily concealable firearm yet large enough to be "user friendly" to the novice shooter.

As for holsters, you'll have to check out different brands and see how they work with your firearm. Everyone's body shape is a little different, so the holster/firearm combination would make a difference.

Bottom line is check out a variety of firearms and see what works best for you. Keep in mind that you may end up having to purchase 2 firearms, one for you and one for your wife. It would all depend on what you and your wife are comfortable with and how proficient you can become with your firearm.



gf
 
For me, what took the longest was finding a holster that was comfortable for extended concealed carry. Guns, holsters, ammunition, training, practice...it's all gonna take some time and a bit of money to settle in, so be patient. You'll meet a lot of great people along the way, so enjoy the experience! But, it won't be cheap.:no:
 
For me, what took the longest was finding a holster that was comfortable for extended concealed carry. Guns, holsters, ammunition, training, practice...it's all gonna take some time and a bit of money to settle in, so be patient. You'll meet a lot of great people along the way, so enjoy the experience! But, it won't be cheap.:no:

I'll second that! I'll also add you will need a good gun belt. Don't skimp on the belt. It's the foundation and will make your carry experience more enjoyable and more comfortable for your back! My 2 cents on the Glock 26...great gun for concealed carry. I almost bought one, but went with S&W M&P 9c. Nice gun and I love the way it shoots. Also comes with different palm swells to conform to different hand sizes.

Welcome to the site!
 
Wow! Excellent responses all!
Very helpful. The thing the jumped out at me was JJFLASH's comment to take my time and enjoy meeting a lot of great people along the way. With all of your great input, I think I have already met some great folks on this forum.
I might mention to all that the advice of testing several types of guns seems very prudent, and I do in fact plan to do that. There is a range here in Tulsa, OK (U.S. Shooting Academy) that I think is just awesome! They offer training that includes gun/holster selection services, so I will take advantage of ththat aspect of their training. Also we've got a couple of gun shows coming to town in the next couple of months. I'll drag wifey out to those just to see what weapons she thinks feels good in her hand.
Getting back to the shooting range I mentioned above. If any of you have the opportunity to be in Tulsa, it would be worth your while to check out the US Shooting Academy. They just opened about 3 years ago and I took a tour of their facilities last week. I was blown away! These guys train LEO's, Swat, Government and military special forces. My guess is if they can accommodate this kind of training, they can help me pick out a gun.:sarcastic:
I've rattled long enough! Thanks again. I look forward to corresponding more with all of you!
 
Wow! Excellent responses all!
Very helpful. The thing the jumped out at me was JJFLASH's comment to take my time and enjoy meeting a lot of great people along the way. With all of your great input, I think I have already met some great folks on this forum.
I might mention to all that the advice of testing several types of guns seems very prudent, and I do in fact plan to do that. There is a range here in Tulsa, OK (U.S. Shooting Academy) that I think is just awesome! They offer training that includes gun/holster selection services, so I will take advantage of ththat aspect of their training. Also we've got a couple of gun shows coming to town in the next couple of months. I'll drag wifey out to those just to see what weapons she thinks feels good in her hand.
Getting back to the shooting range I mentioned above. If any of you have the opportunity to be in Tulsa, it would be worth your while to check out the US Shooting Academy. They just opened about 3 years ago and I took a tour of their facilities last week. I was blown away! These guys train LEO's, Swat, Government and military special forces. My guess is if they can accommodate this kind of training, they can help me pick out a gun.:sarcastic:
I've rattled long enough! Thanks again. I look forward to corresponding more with all of you!

My brother lives in Tulsa and has been to the US Shooting Academy! Top notch from he tells me. We have the S&W facility out in Springfield (2.5 hrs from here) and the Sig Arms facility up in Exeter, NH also about 2 hrs from here. I haven't been to either yet, but am dying to go.
 
take the advice to try as many as you can. as you said that you and your wife will need lots of practice make sure that the gun you choose fits comfortably in your hands. if it does not feel comfortable then shooting it dealing with the recoil is not going to make it any more fun. as for myself the baby desert eagle known as the "jericho" now is one of the most comfortable guns I have held. but it might not be for you or your wife. hold as many guns as you can and make your own opinion.

as far as holsters go. I use the smart carry holster which for me is very comfortable even with a full size 4.5 inch barrel. it keeps the pistol in front of you so no need to reach behind you if you have to draw it. you can check it out here.
Link Removed
 
I am partial to my revolver and feel comfortable with it. I like the revolver for personal protection since there is no safety to "off" and the misfire issue is solved with another pull of the trigger. It’s reliable and goes bang every time I use it, no matter what kind of ammo I use at the range. Last weekend I put about 175 rounds of old reloads and a box of old Remington Police Service 38S&W spec. (lead round nose) close to 30 or more years old!!! 4" groups at 35 ft and I'm no pro shooter!! Revolvers are simple to load and maintain.
Now...
With that written… I am waiting for the funds in my PayPal account to clear so that I can get my hands on a Smith and Wesson M&P 45acp. It will be easier to carry concealed in the warm weather, but it will take time for me to get used to...
As stated above in other posts, try many (rent at ranges that do so) and choose “The One”. Make sure it’s one that: Allows you to shoot well (consistently), feels comfortable when fired (recoil is manageable for both you and your wife), and allows you to conceal it when needed. Another consideration with autos is reliable performance with personal protection ammo. Again try many choose one… Keep range notes for each of the ones tried and note the entire experience for each type. As far as expense… Get ready for the cost of ammo (which has been on the rise), the cost of range time. I spent $20.00 today and the weekend before and I’m in the process of applying for a membership at a private sporting club that a friend of mine is a member of (Good idea in the future if you would like to spend time getting proficient with your tool of choice). The cost of the firearm itself will also be an expense as well as a good holster for you and for your wife. I've been told that the CrossBreed SuperTuck is a good investment so I'm going to try one with the M&P and I'll post my results.

Many things to think about so ask questions, read all the advice (especially from this site, so many wise old owls here) and post your results so others will benefit. Good luck…:yes4:
 
I would also second the advice about two guns. One for both you and your wife. She is the only one that can protect her 24 hours a day. Besides you might get into a situation someday when you need someone to cover your back and it will be really nice to have your wife armed when that happens.
 
My brother lives in Tulsa and has been to the US Shooting Academy! Top notch from he tells me. We have the S&W facility out in Springfield (2.5 hrs from here) and the Sig Arms facility up in Exeter, NH also about 2 hrs from here. I haven't been to either yet, but am dying to go.

I'll be heading out to S&W once I get my M&P45. I'm gonna get the trigger pull toned down a bit from the MA compliant 12+lbs!!! Also going to add the manual thumb safety (another MA compliance blunder!!! Since when is an added manual safety non compliant!! Anyway, ignore my ranting). Maybe it's time for a convoy!!!
 
Snowflakes

Personally I prefer the .40 S&W over 9mm but aside from the difference in caliber, I was just recently looking for a new EDC. I had planned on getting a Glock 23 but when "playing" with the Glock 23 and the Springfield XD40, the XD just fit my hand a little better and I liked the trigger pull better. I, to my own surprise, wound up going with the XD. Oh, I guess another thing that helped sell it was the ambidextrous mag release (lefty here). I've always owned right-hand-oriented guns so it's become natural to manipulate my left hand fingers to operate the right-hand oriented mag releases but it'd be nice to have a lefty-friendly gun for once.

It comes down to snowflakes. Yes, I said snowflakes. You know, the saying how "we're all like snowflakes, each one individual and unique"? It goes for guns, too. What works best for one guy may not work well for the next. Especially when there's a gender boundary being crossed with a mutual firearm. I've got big hands for a man, and my wife has small hands for a woman. I don't think there's a gun out there that will fit us both really well. There are only a couple of autos that fit her hand - we ended up getting her a Taurus 851 CIA 38Spl revolver. The same goes for carry options. I personally am very comfortable carrying IWB in the appendix position. Most people seem to experience some discomfort when sitting (driving) while carrying in that position. Doesn't bother me a bit. I think a lot of folks wear a should rig more comfortably than I do. Different hands, bodies, shapes, sizes, etc..

SO... like it's already been said, you need to try some different guns on for size. Find out what rides comfortably, what shoots comfortably, what fits your hand comfortably, what guns have a better natural point of aim for you than others... Now that you CAN carry, it's time to personalize!!
 

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