Great to see More Women at the Range


ulatek

New member
I would just like to say I've seen more and more women at the range lately both shooting and purchasing firearms. I am really thrilled to see more women taking the steps to protect themselves and their families. I am really happy to see everyone out practicing with their chosen firearm as well and not just letting it sit in a drawer. It's important to be comfortable with the weapon and not just hope to be ready if something goes wrong.

Stay sharp,

Chuck
 

straxler

New member
I've found the guys at the range to be very accepting; I was afraid of a patronizing attitude from some of the good old boys, but I have been treated with respect for my efforts and abilities.
 

-06

New member
Ditto on them smelling and looking better than us guys. Have been working with a lady from another site a few times. Tried to teach her instinctive(point) shooting but she is intent on learning to shoot targets. Will be meeting again Thurs afternoon to just practice techniques of target shooting. She has improved greatly but still flinches badly. Will be loading her mags and have some snap caps to slip in so she can easily see how badly she flinches. She is grouping fairly well occasionally. She is very serious about accuracy. Headed to Florida and SC to some training courses shortly. Will just be "plum tickled" to see that gal start putting them in the 10 ring.
 

Phillip Gain

New member
Ditto on them smelling and looking better than us guys. Have been working with a lady from another site a few times. Tried to teach her instinctive(point) shooting but she is intent on learning to shoot targets. Will be meeting again Thurs afternoon to just practice techniques of target shooting. She has improved greatly but still flinches badly. Will be loading her mags and have some snap caps to slip in so she can easily see how badly she flinches. She is grouping fairly well occasionally. She is very serious about accuracy. Headed to Florida and SC to some training courses shortly. Will just be "plum tickled" to see that gal start putting them in the 10 ring.

My advice would be to let her get comfortable with bullseye, and get over her flinching issue, before going on to point shooting. Once she gets into a comfort zone, she'll be better able to get her head around the concept that accurate isn't always better, and that it's better to use 8 shots to make 8 holes in 8 organs than to use 8 shots to make 1 hole in 1 organ.

Sounds like she's on her way. :)
 

OnePsychLynne

New member
I just recently became really interested in guns when my husband mentioned taking his 9mm to the range to practice. I grew up around guns but never really gave them any thought until then. I'm proud to say I now have my CWP and own a Smith & Wesson M&P 9C (which I absolutely LOVE to shoot) and a Ruger LCP (which I haven't figured out how to shoot naturally yet-the trigger pull is HORRENDOUS and the way my finger fits naturally on the trigger doesn't do the job). I have to practice with it a lot and if I can't make it work I'll have to sell it and try something else. Sig Sauer p238 maybe? The M&P doesn't fit in my purse or on my person very well, but it makes a wonderful house/automobile/hotel room gun.

Anyone else had problems with the Ruger? I considered a trigger shoe, but hubby doesn't think it would be a good idea to modify the gun in any way. TIA!
 

Treo

Bullet Proof
I would just like to say I've seen more and more women at the range lately both shooting and purchasing firearms. I am really thrilled to see more women taking the steps to protect themselves and their families. I am really happy to see everyone out practicing with their chosen firearm as well and not just letting it sit in a drawer. It's important to be comfortable with the weapon and not just hope to be ready if something goes wrong.

Stay sharp,

Chuck

It's even better when they're h:biggrin:t women
 

TekGreg

New member
Ditto on them smelling and looking better than us guys. Have been working with a lady from another site a few times. Tried to teach her instinctive(point) shooting but she is intent on learning to shoot targets. Will be meeting again Thurs afternoon to just practice techniques of target shooting. She has improved greatly but still flinches badly. Will be loading her mags and have some snap caps to slip in so she can easily see how badly she flinches. She is grouping fairly well occasionally. She is very serious about accuracy. Headed to Florida and SC to some training courses shortly. Will just be "plum tickled" to see that gal start putting them in the 10 ring.

-06, You didn't mention what caliber she was shooting, but I start every new shooter, male or female, with .22 LR and a heavy gun so that they have absolutely no fear and they (and I) can see what they are doing themselves that cannot be attributed to the gun or the caliber. I only "graduate" people that can properly shoot a .22 and have solved any inherent problems established by my target analysis guide. Besides, .22 is so much cheaper to shoot while getting someone used to all of the right way to do things!

Also, if it is the noise that is scaring her and causing the flinch, use the small, in-ear earplugs WITH headphones. You will have to touch her shoulder and yell to be heard, but the gun will become much less intimidating when it can't be heard. It's a mouse gun if it doesn't roar!

Good luck on keeping her in the sport and I hope she enjoys it more!
 

jeepgal1961

New member
-06, You didn't mention what caliber she was shooting, but I start every new shooter, male or female, with .22 LR and a heavy gun so that they have absolutely no fear and they (and I) can see what they are doing themselves that cannot be attributed to the gun or the caliber. I only "graduate" people that can properly shoot a .22 and have solved any inherent problems established by my target analysis guide. Besides, .22 is so much cheaper to shoot while getting someone used to all of the right way to do things!

Also, if it is the noise that is scaring her and causing the flinch, use the small, in-ear earplugs WITH headphones. You will have to touch her shoulder and yell to be heard, but the gun will become much less intimidating when it can't be heard. It's a mouse gun if it doesn't roar!

Good luck on keeping her in the sport and I hope she enjoys it more!

I'm the flincher!

I've been shooting a .22lr for months. I have no issues with it. I can shoot fairly tight groups with it as well. I already double plug! I think I just need to shoot more to get over it. It's a HK P30 9mm and I haven't had it very long. The one thing that has helped me the most was Bill Grays Bump Drill. It helped me see what a surprise break really was. When I don't anticipate the break, the shot goes where I want it to. I try hard to focus on the front sight, but I end up watching the hammer move and I can tell when the shot is going to break.
 

TekGreg

New member
I would just like to say I've seen more and more women at the range lately both shooting and purchasing firearms. I am really thrilled to see more women taking the steps to protect themselves and their families. I am really happy to see everyone out practicing with their chosen firearm as well and not just letting it sit in a drawer. It's important to be comfortable with the weapon and not just hope to be ready if something goes wrong.

Stay sharp,

Chuck

Real men aren't threatened by women not only knowing how to defend themselves but also enjoying themselves on the range and finding the fun in the sport just as we have! The day should be long gone of the YouTube videos that show three drunken (male) idiots handing a very frail woman a .44 Desert Eagle and laughing when it recoils into her forehead. I have always wanted to see her turn that hand cannon on them and watch them run for the hills!

I think it's real men that step up and answer questions and are helpful to the women on the range and make them want to come back. Keep the women coming back and make our sport that much more beautiful and challenging!
 

TekGreg

New member
I'm the flincher!

I've been shooting a .22lr for months. I have no issues with it. I can shoot fairly tight groups with it as well. I already double plug! I think I just need to shoot more to get over it. It's a HK P30 9mm and I haven't had it very long. The one thing that has helped me the most was Bill Grays Bump Drill. It helped me see what a surprise break really was. When I don't anticipate the break, the shot goes where I want it to. I try hard to focus on the front sight, but I end up watching the hammer move and I can tell when the shot is going to break.

Hey, JeepGal! Thanks for responding! Sounds like your trainer is doing everything right! The reason he is advocating point shooting drills is because you are looking at the target but the gun is not in your sight line, so you cannot see any part of the gun, therefore you are unable to anticipate nothing. Besides point shooting being a good skill in the event that you are not able to take the time to aim, it will keep you from looking at the gun. You might try it just long enough to see if it breaks your flinching problem.

Your other option would be to rent or borrow a Glock or other hammerless pistol - if it has no hammer, you can't stare at it! This will break you quickly as your vision has to remain on the front sight/target as it's supposed to and none of the gun parts will "telegraph" its intent.
 

jeepgal1961

New member
Hey, JeepGal! Thanks for responding! Sounds like your trainer is doing everything right! The reason he is advocating point shooting drills is because you are looking at the target but the gun is not in your sight line, so you cannot see any part of the gun, therefore you are unable to anticipate nothing. Besides point shooting being a good skill in the event that you are not able to take the time to aim, it will keep you from looking at the gun. You might try it just long enough to see if it breaks your flinching problem.

Your other option would be to rent or borrow a Glock or other hammerless pistol - if it has no hammer, you can't stare at it! This will break you quickly as your vision has to remain on the front sight/target as it's supposed to and none of the gun parts will "telegraph" its intent.

Now I really have a reason to buy that M&P :) I have actually been thinking about a striker fired pistol so that I can't see the hammer fall.
 

G50AE

Well-known member
Rimfire Shooters

I've been shooting a .22lr for months. I have no issues with it. I can shoot fairly tight groups with it as well. I already double plug! I think I just need to shoot more to get over it. It's a HK P30 9mm and I haven't had it very long. The one thing that has helped me the most was Bill Grays Bump Drill. It helped me see what a surprise break really was. When I don't anticipate the break, the shot goes where I want it to. I try hard to focus on the front sight, but I end up watching the hammer move and I can tell when the shot is going to break.

And they were bringing rimfire shooters to his shooting range that he might let them get a lane on his rifle range, and the disciples rebuked them. But when Jesus saw it, he was indignant and said to them, "Let the rimfire shooters come to me and set up in an empty lane on my shooting range; do not hinder them, for to such belongs at the gunclub of God. Truly, I say to you, whoever does not practice at my rifle range like these rimfire shooters shall not become a member of the gunclub of God." And he took them in his arms and blessed them, and gave them a twenty percent off coupon for their next purchase at Cabelas.
 

TekGreg

New member
Now I really have a reason to buy that M&P :) I have actually been thinking about a striker fired pistol so that I can't see the hammer fall.

Tada! See there? You can always find a training reason to purchase a new handgun! :man_in_love: Between a hammerless design and some point shooting or moving target drills, you should be flinch-free in no time! Also, let us know what worked for you so we can all learn what to use for the next person that has a similar problem. We all need to keep learning! :biggrin:
 

jeepgal1961

New member
I've been telling myself that I needed an M&P as a backup for a class I'm taking in October. I'm traveling a long way for this class and it would really not make my day if something broke on my only 9mm.

Now I have an even better reason:)Because TekGreg said so lol

I have narrowed it down to the 9mm Pro. I just can't make up my mind between barrel sizes. NO I can't have both!
 

Providence Ranch

New member
I too am encouraged and blessed to see women at the range.

Regarding the trigger pull issue, I've found that internal/external hammer really makes no difference. Not an instructor or anything, just a lifetime of shooting everything I can get my hands on!

But seriously folks...

Even if using a pistol without a visible hammer, your weapon WILL communicate its impending trigger break to you through the trigger itself. Thus, as you are tempted to follow the travel of the hammer, you would instead follow the pressure curve of the trigger squeeze, leading to the same undesirable "push." For me, the key is to focus on sight alignment as you steadily increase trigger pressure, and include intermissions of dry practice several times during each live fire session.

Dry practice. Fire. Repeat as desired. Go home and have a beer.
 

TekGreg

New member
I've been telling myself that I needed an M&P as a backup for a class I'm taking in October. I'm traveling a long way for this class and it would really not make my day if something broke on my only 9mm.

Now I have an even better reason:)Because TekGreg said so lol

I have narrowed it down to the 9mm Pro. I just can't make up my mind between barrel sizes. NO I can't have both!

Hey, JeepGal!

Glad to know I'm giving you a good reason to increase your collection! It's a better investment than your IRA these days!

As for barrel length, everyone advocates the shorter barrel as being easier to conceal when you carry as well as making the overall gun lighter. However, a longer barrel and heavier gun is more accurate, has more controllable recoil, moves the muzzle flash and noise farther away from your face and therefore, for your situation, the longer barrel is the better choice. If you later decide you wish the carry (shorter) barrel, you can probably trade with someone on the forum straight across ($0). But while your getting your basic skills down, long barrels, heavy guns, all the stuff the "Macho" guys wouldn't be caught dead with are your friend! :sarcastic:
 

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