Florida Police Say 7-Year-Old Girl Accidentally Shoots Sleeping Mom Twice


HK4U

New member
Somebody tell me what type of gun this might have been to accidentally shoot not once but twice.

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Florida Police Say 7-Year-Old Girl Accidentally Shoots Sleeping Mom Twice
Saturday, May 24, 2008

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BOCA RATON, Fla. — Authorities say a 7-year-old girl accidentally shot her sleeping mother twice in a South Florida neighborhood, but the woman is expected to recover.

Authorities say 38-year-old Sharda Brijmohan was asleep in her bedroom Friday when her daughter walked over to a nightstand and picked up a handgun. Authorities say it accidentally fired. She was shot once in the forearm and once in the neck.

Paramedics drove the woman to Delray Medical Center, where she's expected to recover.
 

DrDavidM

New member
This is a little hard to believe. Obviously guns don't just go off. I can see someone accidently firing a gun once. But twice? Something funny is going on.
 
Hard to believe that the gun went off twice. Interesting to hear the whole story when details become available.



gf
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
I want a picture of a gun with arms that it uses to squeeze its own trigger whenever it finds itself in a dangerous situation being handled by someone with few witnesses around.

Most guns spend the majority of their time sitting in holsters, sitting on tables, or hanging in racks. Yet, it's odd that these guns never go off while just sitting around. You never hear, "It was just sitting there, and BOOM! It fired!" Miraculously, it's always the 0.0001% of the time in the gun's existence that someone happens to be holding it. With those kinds of odds, these people should try playing the lottery.

Of course, they're probably just leaving out the part about, "And then I touched the trigger...well...I guess I accidentally squeezed it..."
 

FN1910

New member
The heck with that. I am still trying to find the ones that say don't worry about unloading before cleaning or don't bother to check if it is unloaded before removing slide.

Both of those situations seem to be much more common than guns going off by themselves. How many people will not buy a gun becasue you have to pull the trigger to field strip it?
 

Cooter

Liberty or Death
The dumbed down general public has been trained to believe that guns go off by themselves. I'd bet this girl gets off clean.
This is obviously foul play involved.
 

LiveBlues

Chuck & Ted 2012
Regardless of how it went off in the first place, who in the world would leave a loaded handgun on a nightstand with a 7 year old in the house? That is just plain stupidity.
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
My opinion on this is that the kid saw the mother sleeping, so she picked the gun up and having learned that guns are toys, promptly decided to "shoot" her mother - ie, it was intentional but she probably didn't know what effect a real gun actually has. It's plausible that after the first shot, she panicked and accidentally squeezed the trigger again.

First off, children should not learn that guns are toys. Some will say that children need to have fun, and I agree - but if they're being raised to learn to shoot, that "guns are not toys" philosophy should come in handy reasonably soon. There's lots of better candidates available for actual toys.

Secondly, what moron leaves a gun out lying around when there's a 7-yr old running the house? Don't be stupid.
 

GregRN

New member
Regardless of how it went off in the first place, who in the world would leave a loaded handgun on a nightstand with a 7 year old in the house? That is just plain stupidity.

Sorry, but I wholeheartedly disagree. That statement sounds like it came directly from the Brady Bunch. Guns are not the problem. Lack of parenting is the problem. Teach, train, and supervise.
My children never care to touch my guns. My children respect authority. I often ask my children to touch and handle my guns (supervised of course) and they spend a total of 30 seconds with it before handing it back with loss of interest. I do not wait for them to ask me to handle the weapon. I offer and actually push (only a little) to get them to touch my guns supervised. Then as my guns are lying on a table, my sons walk right past them as if they are nothing more than a book on that table. But, if it makes any one feel better, just know that neither of my sons is strong enough to pull the triggers on my carry weapons. That was tested as late as yesterday.
Quit blaming the guns. Blame the parents. Padded playgrounds, child proof packages, cabinet locks, and etc have taken the place of parenting, and can't totally replace a mom and a dad.
 
Sorry, but I wholeheartedly disagree. That statement sounds like it came directly from the Brady Bunch. Guns are not the problem. Lack of parenting is the problem. Teach, train, and supervise.
My children never care to touch my guns. My children respect authority. I often ask my children to touch and handle my guns (supervised of course) and they spend a total of 30 seconds with it before handing it back with loss of interest. I do not wait for them to ask me to handle the weapon. I offer and actually push (only a little) to get them to touch my guns supervised. Then as my guns are lying on a table, my sons walk right past them as if they are nothing more than a book on that table. But, if it makes any one feel better, just know that neither of my sons is strong enough to pull the triggers on my carry weapons. That was tested as late as yesterday.
Quit blaming the guns. Blame the parents. Padded playgrounds, child proof packages, cabinet locks, and etc have taken the place of parenting, and can't totally replace a mom and a dad.

Just a word of caution regarding your children not being "strong enough" to pull the triggers. Keep in mind that the day they do find the "strength" or possibly technique required to pull the trigger, it WILL be a very bad day. I strongly recommend keeping the firearm secured and inaccessable to your children. As an NRA instructor, I'm familiar with this concept as it is taught in NRA classes.

I agree with allowing children to handle firearms under close supervision. I have a 4 year old that enjoys checking out "daddy's guns". He will do so only under my supervision and he needs to ask nicely :wink:

I sincerely hope that you will reconsider your stance on keeping your firearms secure for the sake of your children.



gf
 

FN1910

New member
The jails are full of people that were taught better by their parents and if you sak the parents they would never have done such a crime and are totally innocent. The 4 year old that enjoys checking out Daddy's gun but would never do it unless he has permission and the ones that don't have enough strenght to pull the trigger are being taught well. However I have seen and known children, including myself probably, that no matter how well they are taught can have a moment or lapse in judgement and that is all it takes.

Please do not lull yourself into complacency because your 7 year-old always asks you if he can touch your gun before he does it. When you aren't around for him to ask he may very well assume that it is allright for him to do it.

I mean how many times do you hear that "My son could not have killed that cop because I taught him better."?
 

Ektarr

Dedicated Infidel
Returning to the thread, I can see where this scenario can occur. If the firearm was an automatic, a larger caliber, the involuntary shock reflex of responding to the first shot could cause the child's muscles to flinch, pulling the (now reloaded) trigger again.
 

LiveBlues

Chuck & Ted 2012
Sorry, but I wholeheartedly disagree. That statement sounds like it came directly from the Brady Bunch. Guns are not the problem. Lack of parenting is the problem. Teach, train, and supervise.
My children never care to touch my guns. My children respect authority. I often ask my children to touch and handle my guns (supervised of course) and they spend a total of 30 seconds with it before handing it back with loss of interest. I do not wait for them to ask me to handle the weapon. I offer and actually push (only a little) to get them to touch my guns supervised. Then as my guns are lying on a table, my sons walk right past them as if they are nothing more than a book on that table. But, if it makes any one feel better, just know that neither of my sons is strong enough to pull the triggers on my carry weapons. That was tested as late as yesterday.
Quit blaming the guns. Blame the parents. Padded playgrounds, child proof packages, cabinet locks, and etc have taken the place of parenting, and can't totally replace a mom and a dad.


Why take a chance?

I'm not blaming guns at all. I'm blaming poor decisions.
 

FN1910

New member
Returning to the thread, I can see where this scenario can occur. If the firearm was an automatic, a larger caliber, the involuntary shock reflex of responding to the first shot could cause the child's muscles to flinch, pulling the (now reloaded) trigger again.

Every now and then the impossible happens. I don't know how it happened but your theory is a good as any I have read so far.
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
Then as my guns are lying on a table, my sons walk right past them as if they are nothing more than a book on that table. But, if it makes any one feel better, just know that neither of my sons is strong enough to pull the triggers on my carry weapons.
Children grow and change quickly, and are not typically consistent in either their interests or their physical strength. A kid who yesterday couldn't open a door may tomorrow decide to flip the deadbolt open, turn the knob and run out into the street. There's incidents all the time where people who didn't think their kid was capable of something end up having them open a gate and drown in a pool, get in the car and knock it out of gear on a hill, or accidentally shoot themselves. Never underestimate the ability of a child or the power of simple leverage.

I don't typically lock my weapons (of all kinds) up per se, but there's never any kids here, either. I do however keep them in a secure location. If someone walked in my front door, they wouldn't see any weapons lying around. This is a basic tactical measure; if someone breaks in, I'm not giving them anything additional to attack me with. I would feel pretty stupid if someone came at me with a sledgehammer because it was lying next to the front door.
 

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