Feds Plan 'Surge' if Mexico Drug Violence Spills Into U.S.


HK4U

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Feds Plan 'Surge' if Mexico Drug Violence Spills Into U.S.


EL PASO, Texas — If Mexican drug violence spills across the U.S. border, Homeland Security officials say they have a contingency plan to assist border areas that includes bringing in the military.

"It's a common sense extension of our continued work with our state, local, and tribal partners in securing the southwest border," DHS spokeswoman Amy Kudwa said Friday.

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, who described the contingency plan in an interview with The New York Times this week, said he ordered specific plans to be drawn up this summer as violence in Mexico continued to mount.

The plan includes federal homeland security agents helping local authorities and maybe even military assistance from the Department of Defense, possibly including aircraft, armored vehicles and special teams to go to areas overwhelmed with violence, authorities said.

Kudwa would not give specifics on the so-called "surge" plan, but said it does not create any new authorities.

In the last year, more than 5,000 people have been killed and police and military officials have become common targets for violent drug cartels who are fighting with each other and the government for control of lucrative drug and human smuggling routes across Mexico.

More than one-fifth of the deaths have occurred in Ciudad Juarez, the hardscrabble border city just across the Rio Grande from El Paso.

Officials in Mexico reported about 1,600 homicides in Juarez in 2007 and at least 20 people have been killed in the first nine days of this year.

To date, there has been no significant violent spillover from the drug war in Mexico, but U.S. authorities have spent a tense year watching and waiting.

In October, Hidalgo County officials issued fully automatic weapons to deputies patrolling the river in the Rio Grande Valley. Sheriff Lupe Trevino also authorized his deputies to return fire across the border if smugglers or other criminals took aim at them.

In El Paso, the country's largest border community and one of the safest metropolitan areas in the nation, Sheriff Richard Wiles said that while he doesn't anticipate the city or county being overwhelmed by border violence he applauded the DHS plan to quickly respond if the worst should happen.

"I think it's appropriate for the federal government to have a contingency plan all the way up to the worst case scenario," Wiles said.

The contingency plan was news to most border states.

"At this point, DHS has not contacted the California National Guard to bring any forces ... to support first responders, i.e. (U.S.) Border Patrol, at the border in California," California National Guard spokesman Jonathan Guibord said Friday.

He said National Guard officials in California know only "what's been publicized" about the plan, but added that state military officials routinely train and prepare to respond to any order from Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger or the president.

Katherine Cesinger, a spokeswoman for Texas Gov. Rick Perry, said Texas officials were briefed on the plan but were not consulted beforehand about a plan to fight Mexican drug cartels on the 2,000-mile U.S. border, more than half of which is in Texas.

Cesinger said the state has its own specific security plans for each area of the Texas border should violence from Mexico become an issue. She declined to give specifics of those plans.

Officials with New Mexico's Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management said they are in constant contact with federal Homeland Security officials but weren't aware of any specific security plan that could include Department of Defense assets.

"We haven't seen a specific operational plan for a specific region or specific threat. The use of Defense Department resources ... would have to be an extreme situation," said Tim Manning, the New Mexico Homeland Security director.

Homeland Security officials did not respond to questions about which local or state agencies were notified about the surge plan.


Again I would like to add the following quote.


"Today, America would be outraged if U.N. troops entered Los Angeles to restore order. Tomorrow they will be grateful! This is especially true if they were told that there were an outside threat from beyond, whether real or promulgated, that threatened our very existence. It is then that all peoples of the world will plead to deliver them from this evil. The one thing every man fears is the unknown. When presented with this scenario, individual rights will be willingly relinquished for the guarantee of their well-being granted to them by the World Government."
Dr. Henry Kissinger, Bilderberger Conference, Evians, France, 1991
 

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gpbarth

Guest
"Today, America would be outraged if U.N. troops entered Los Angeles to restore order. Tomorrow they will be grateful! This is especially true if they were told that there were an outside threat from beyond, whether real or promulgated, that threatened our very existence. It is then that all peoples of the world will plead to deliver them from this evil. The one thing every man fears is the unknown. When presented with this scenario, individual rights will be willingly relinquished for the guarantee of their well-being granted to them by the World Government." Dr. Henry Kissinger, Bilderberger Conference, Evians, France, 1991

Holy crap! Iif that statement doesn't scare a U.S. citizen, then he's a fool! That was 1991, and look at where we are going under our ruler...er...president-elect. Long live the revolution!
 

DocBoCook

Not Negotiable, A Right
anyone willing to give up freedoms for security, deserves neither!! (it's a quote, I don't remember who)
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
This might be an example of the military actually being assigned to do what it's supposed to do - protecting the United States from a foreign threat, rather than noodling around in Iraq or whatever. Mercenaries and gangs from Mexico are well-equipped, funded and as we've seen are more than a match for local law enforcement.
 

HK4U

New member
I would not mind them stopping mercenaries and gangs from crossing the border. Patroling and fighting in the streets of America is another matter.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
I remember about two or three years ago when Congress was debating what should be done about the southern border, how Democrats and several moderate Republicans, including John McCain, were shunning the idea of "militarizing" the border. Why? What's wrong with using the military to back up the Border Patrol if it works?
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
I remember about two or three years ago when Congress was debating what should be done about the southern border, how Democrats and several moderate Republicans, including John McCain, were shunning the idea of "militarizing" the border. Why? What's wrong with using the military to back up the Border Patrol if it works?
Depends on where it's being militarized. Out in the boondocks and where the gangs like to cross over is fine. We should have bases out there that concentrate on carrying out strikes on cartel assets and intercepting them.

Areas where the general public and commercial vehicles cross is another story. You don't want to scare tourists, and it looks creepy besides.
 

maybejim

Maybejim
In El Paso, the country's largest border community and one of the safest metropolitan areas in the nation, Sheriff Richard Wiles said that while he doesn't anticipate the city or county being overwhelmed by border violence he applauded the DHS plan to quickly respond if the worst should happen.

That's not the reports I'm hearing from my son who's stationed in El Paso. Large parts of the city are off limits to the military because of the spillover violence.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
Depends on where it's being militarized. Out in the boondocks and where the gangs like to cross over is fine. We should have bases out there that concentrate on carrying out strikes on cartel assets and intercepting them.

Areas where the general public and commercial vehicles cross is another story. You don't want to scare tourists, and it looks creepy besides.

What's more important, keeping out potentially dangerous people who aren't supposed to be here anyway, or making the place look less scary for tourists? Aren't the illegals doing that all by themselves?
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
What's more important, keeping out potentially dangerous people who aren't supposed to be here anyway, or making the place look less scary for tourists? Aren't the illegals doing that all by themselves?
The people who we really need to be worried about aren't crossing at major areas where there's lots of tourists and semi trucks getting weighed. They hang around the middle of nowhere, where they're less likely to be spotted by LEOs.

A while back, major cartels operating out of SA were flying up old airliners full of drugs to northwest Mexico and unloading their cargo to smugglers who would run it across the border. They use 4x4s, low-flying planes, etc and if confronted, may occasionally become violent. This may more often be the case if they've got the support of rogue army units on their side.

It's those people we need to look out for and use military force against. We should also pressure the Mexican and other Central and South American governments to allow us to actively carry out airstrikes and gunship attacks on the cartel leaders. Devastating violence is the only language those people understand.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
The people who we really need to be worried about aren't crossing at major areas where there's lots of tourists and semi trucks getting weighed.

Actually a lot of them are crossing the border in plain sight, being smuggled in vehicles.
 

DocBoCook

Not Negotiable, A Right
I'm just glad after March, I will no longer be part of the Sham this is what the US Military has become over the last 5-7 years
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
Actually a lot of them are crossing the border in plain sight, being smuggled in vehicles.
Of course, but those aren't the ones that would be best handled by the military. What value would troops add to the situation that the border patrol can't do just as well? I don't remember the last time there was a gunfight involving automatic rifles or grenades at a US border checkpoint.
 

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