Eight more State IDs not accepted bu US military bases.


Oldgrunt

Well-known member
From the 3 June 2017 issue of Military.com.


Military.com | 3 Jun 2017 | by Amy Bushatz


Driver's licenses and most other IDs issued by eight additional states will no longer be accepted as official identification for accessing U.S. military bases -- starting July 10 -- unless new extensions are granted by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Pentagon officials said this week.

All non-enhanced, state-issued IDs from Oregon, Alaska, Oklahoma, Kentucky, South Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Washington will join IDs from Montana, Minnesota, Missouri and Maine on the list of those that do not comply with federal identification standards and cannot be used to enter federal facilities, according to DHS.


At issue is a 2005 law known as the Real ID Act, which requires states to meet minimum security requirements for state-issued ID cards such as driver's licenses, according to DHS. Although the agency’s extension for the eight states expires June 6, Pentagon officials have granted extra time for DoD-operated locations.

"After a short grace period, we will begin enforcing the Real ID Act's prohibition on July 10th, 2017," said Navy Cmdr. Linda K. Rojas, a DoD spokesperson.

Lawmakers in South Carolina, Alaska, Washington, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Montana, Minnesota and Maine have passed legislation to bring their state IDs into compliance, according to news reports. However, simply passing a law does not automatically ensure an extension, a DHS official said. As of June 2, those states had not been granted extra time, Rojas said.

"Extensions are granted following a formal DHS review process after a state makes a request," said Justine Whelan, a DHS spokesperson. "The basic concept of an extension is that steps are being taken, or have already been taken, to come into compliance. But a state needs time or other resources to fully implement."

Whelan declined to speculate whether the eight states would receive extensions before the June 6 or July 10 deadlines. Base visitors looking for up-to-date information on compliant IDs and extensions can visit the DHS interactive map, she said.

While Homeland Security officials have issued a list of other acceptable forms of identification, including U.S. passports and Native American tribal ID cards, installation commanders are free to develop their own lists of supplemental forms of ID.

Those lists vary by base. For example, some bases, such as Fort Leavenworth, Kans., accept non-compliant IDs if they are accompanied by voter registration cards, while Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., does not. Visitors with IDs from non-compliant states should contact the base they wish to access for more information.
 

And some of those state issued ID's will no longer be accepted by TSA for boarding aircraft beginning Jan 22, 2018. Imagine the chaos that is going to cause! A Washington state resident attempting to board a plane at SEATAC to fly from Seattle to Spokane won't be able to if all they have for ID is their standard Washington state driver's license. There are signs up now at SEATAC that state Washington standard driver's licenses will no longer be accepted beginning Jan 22.

And still, the Democrats whine and cry at the thought of someone having to produce any ID at all in order to vote, calling it "voter suppression".
 
I read the list of states posted by Old Grunt and the only one I would ever want to live in would be S Carolina anyway. I actually went to the base closest to us to get a new sticker and they don't do that anymore because it is now 100% ID check all the time. Makes more sense.

The Place To Be
 
New York has joined in too I believe end 2019 is the deadline, at the start on 2020 everyone will need enhance to travel via plane “anywhere” or cross US Borders


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Sure am glad my military ID i.e. federal ID is accepted in all fifty states and all military bases.

Seriously, folks:

- Few Americans want illegal aliens to vote in our federal elections

- Most Americans know that a federal voter ID -- separate from California's and other states' malarky -- is the only easy, safe, and effective way to ensure that someone walking into the polls is actually a citizen IF that ID is tied to a system like BIDS used to verify access to military bases.

- The Common Access Card used by Active Duty United States Defense personnel, Selected Reserve, National Guard, United States Department of Defense (DoD) civilian employees, United States Coast Guard (USCG) civilian employees and eligible DoD and USCG contractor personnel. Both the card and the systems which utilize it have been battle-tested in real-world situations around the globe for two decades and has been appropriately hardened.

- The card could easily double as a national ID card, useful for ensuring continuity of identification across states, to include National Voter ID, healthcare, a backup for State ID, green cards, welfare/food stamps, VISAs for visitors, etc. Done right, it could also be "loaned" to states in lieu of their own drivers licence identification.

- Since the CC (command and control) of the card is handled centrally, not at the card itself, the card itself can't be hacked. If someone loses a card, it's simply deactivated. If anyone applies for a card and their fingerprints are already in the system, there's an investigation to confirm their identity and all other cards are deactivated. Fingerprints are merely primary personal ID. a retinal scan is backup. The two are associated at initial card issue and can be verified at any time in case there's a question.

It's either that or continue with widespread voter fraud. Your choice.

Here's the alternative, when States Ignore the Constitution: New California Law Protects Undocumented Immigrants In Court
 
UPDATE: Currently all states are compliant or have an approved extension in place. Kentucky has an extension for REAL ID enforcement, allowing Military Installations and Federal agencies to accept driver's licenses and identification cards from Kentucky at Federal facilities, nuclear power plants and federally regulated commercial aircraft until October 10, 2018.

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I disagree with supplying CAC cards to civilians. They're for military use. My retiree ID card isn't a CAC and it works fine. There's no reason why civilians should have CACs.

Looks like my VA card would work too.

If you do a search here on Real ID you'll probably find that there are privacy and other concerns about Real ID, and especially with a 'national ID card'.
 
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I disagree with supplying CAC cards to civilians. They're for military use. My retiree ID card isn't a CAC and it works fine. There's no reason why civilians should have CACs.

Looks like my VA card would work too.

If you do a search here on Real ID you'll probably find that there are privacy and other concerns about Real ID, and especially with a 'national ID card'.
Rhino,
Just an FYI. I think you're right overall about CAC card issuance to civilians and REAL ID is just another in a series of privacy invasions but DoD civilians have had CAC cards for quite a while now and some other departments such as VA also have them.

The Place to Be
 
I know. I had a CAC as a contractor for several years after I retired. I probably should have been more clear by saying they're only for military use. I didn't mean to say they were only for military members. Sorry.
 
I know. I had a CAC as a contractor for several years after I retired. I probably should have been more clear by saying they're only for military use. I didn't mean to say they were only for military members. Sorry.
Np. I did the same thing when I did some related work after I retired. Only difference was the work attire and the facial hair.

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