Do you tell the CT State Trooper you have a CCW?


Daugherty16

New member
This is a duplicate of another post in the general forum. I wondered, Connecticut specific, if anyone has been red-lighted for a traffic stop while carrying, whether the officer asked, whether you offered the info, and how it proceeded.

It seems like a good rule of thumb to hand your CCW over with your CDL, once the officer comes to your window. Maybe try "Hi Officer, there with my drivers license is my carry permit. It is on my (left, right) hip, inside the waistband. I didn't want you to be alarmed if you happen to see it when i reach for the registration in the glove box."

You run the risk of a rookie wanting to disarm you, escalating a routine traffic stop into something potentially dangerous and definitely uncomfortable. Other than that, i don't see the downside. It is easy to imagine the downside if you don't tell and the trooper gets a glimpse of the gun and freaks out.

Any Staties out there? What is your opinion of armed, law-abiding citizens? How would you prefer the traffic stop proceed? How would you respond to a CCW holder notifiying you up front?
 

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whiskey

(echo_5)
When the officer asks for your credentials:

Keep both hands on the wheel,

Look straight ahead,

Respond with "I have a pistol permit and my weapon is (location)",

Thay will tell you how they want you to move/act.

Some take it from you. A few haven't. I've never gotten a ticket :yes2:
 
Gotta disagree, guys.

Connecticut is not a "must inform" state. I personally believe that the second amendment should be our carry permit, and states that require notification are making unreasonable demands on our liberty. Why should we notify an LEO that we are not breaking the law?

Instead, it should be a law that every person carrying a weapon illegally should be required to notify, not the other way around. With as many liberties as are being taken away, don't give away even more!
:no:
 

whiskey

(echo_5)
The most common encounter between police and civilians is a traffic stop. They never know who they're "lighting up". More than a few criminals/suspects have been collared in a "routine" stop.

They don't know who you are. If they see it, you might get dragged out of your vehicle by a nervous cop if you start spouting off some right-wing, pro-2A, "I know my rights!" type talk.

All that are legally armed are on the same team.
Be cool and they will usually reciprocate.
 

FN1910

New member
I was told by an attorney years ago that if there is any question about it to inform the officer.

"Officer, I just want you to know that there is a gun at so-and-so and I have no intention on using it or anything else. Now how do you want me to handle it?"

I know this will irk the stuffings out of some people but the comments about having to notify someone that we are not breaking the law is BS. We are notifying them so we won't get shot due to a misunderstanding. Sometimes I feel like there is something wrong with me as I have never been stopped just so unlike it seems most people are everyday from the posts on the Internet.

If a LEO stops you he already considers you to be a lawbreaker/criminal so this stuff about an innocent party is already out the door. It can either go downhill quickly from ther by acting like a criminal or better by cooperating and acting like the law abiding citizen that you claim you are. The time to argue your 2A rights is not beside the road during a traffic stop but later in court.
 

Daugherty16

New member
Here's what i posted on a similar blog. I stand behind it. There will always be dissent on this topic, and your comments are appreciated. But what i wondered, and hoped to get from this post, was input from actual traffic stops that went either way, and especially from a LEO perspective in my state. Anyway, here is it.

What is in your best interest in a traffic stop? In order - not get shot, not get arrested, not get hassled, not get a ticket. How? It isn't rocket science. Hard to believe so many of you would deliberately set the stage for a potential nasty encounter by insisting on secrecy. You keep your gun secret from the public and the BGs, but not from a LEO in a personal encounter. Period. If you are a legal CCW, your rights are secure. What to do?

#1 - Obey the law. If you must inform, do so.
# 2 Even if you don't legally have to, do it anyway. It is axiomatic if you follow # 3.
#3 Be respectful. LEOs have very tough jobs, but i'm glad they are there doing them. They deal with too many jerkoffs (not to mention criminals) so make the exchange easier for both of you by being pleasant.In other words, let them know you're one of the good guys by telling them up front what they wonder EVERY TIME they approach a car.
#4 Keep your hands on top of the steering wheel until they are at your window. They WILL appreciate it. Move slowly when you do move. Have your wallet in hand if you can without fumbling around in the car while they are approaching - it might look like you're hiding stuff (or grabbing a weapon? )even if you're just going for your registration and proof of insurance. Otherwise leave it in your pocket for now.
# 5 Greet them. Hello officer. What seems to be the trouble?
#6 Hand them your DL and CCW together. Tell him that 2nd one is my carry permit, i am carrying, (where it is - right hip, small of back, etc). If doing so might expose your weapon before you can hand them your CCW, tell them before you reach for your wallet. Go slow. Not using the word GUN is really a simple, but excellent, idea.
#7. If they insist on taking possession of your gun, agree pleasantly(even though this will be the hardest thing you ever let someone do), ask what they want you to do, and offer to help safe it if they are not familiar with the weapon. Especially if you carry with one in the chamber, tell them.
#8. If things get worse from that point, it's on the LEO. Get the badge #, ask for a supervisor to come to the stop.
# 9 otherwise, take your warning or your ticket, take your weapon back as applicable, and get going.

Remember that every single time an officer makes a traffic stop, he is at full alert watching you and assessing whether you are a threat. Every single time. Too darn many get gunned down making a simple traffic stop. So be an un-threat.
 
Just to be clear, I do know of what I speak.

The most common encounter between police and civilians is a traffic stop. They never know who they're "lighting up". More than a few criminals/suspects have been collared in a "routine" stop.

They don't know who you are. If they see it, you might get dragged out of your vehicle by a nervous cop if you start spouting off some right-wing, pro-2A, "I know my rights!" type talk.

All that are legally armed are on the same team.
Be cool and they will usually reciprocate.

Please allow me to dispel your cheery viewpoint, though it does pain me to do so. I was a police officer for three years in a decent sized metro department. I also did some undercover work for a few other departments, both large and small. The reason that I am no longer a police officer is because I really could not stand seeing the daily trampling of the Bill of Rights that I hold so dear.

If you really believe that police officers believe that they are "on the same team" as those of us who legally carry, you are grossly mistaken. While there are undoubtedly officers who know and believe in Bill of Rights (I was one of them), the overwhelming majority believe that "civilians" (they mistakenly believe themselves otherwise) should not be running around with firearms. For most police officers, the gun is not a tool to be used for defense, but a symbol of power. Make no mistake: They do not like citizens legally carrying their greatest symbol of power.

I was told by an attorney years ago that if there is any question about it to inform the officer.

"Officer, I just want you to know that there is a gun at so-and-so and I have no intention on using it or anything else. Now how do you want me to handle it?"

I know this will irk the stuffings out of some people but the comments about having to notify someone that we are not breaking the law is BS. We are notifying them so we won't get shot due to a misunderstanding. Sometimes I feel like there is something wrong with me as I have never been stopped just so unlike it seems most people are everyday from the posts on the Internet.

If a LEO stops you he already considers you to be a lawbreaker/criminal so this stuff about an innocent party is already out the door. It can either go downhill quickly from ther by acting like a criminal or better by cooperating and acting like the law abiding citizen that you claim you are. The time to argue your 2A rights is not beside the road during a traffic stop but later in court.

If you are pulled over for a traffic citation, then bringing firearms into the conversation is NOT a good idea. That said, being polite, even when asserting your rights, is definitely the right strategy. For me, I turn on the interior light if it is dark, place both hands on the wheel, and I keep my registration and insurance on the visor so that I do not have to root around in the glove compartment. I never answer questions that might incriminate me in any way (Do you know why I am pulling you over?). I never make exculpatory statements. I never, never lie to an officer, but I also know what information I am required to give (license, registration, and proof of insurance). I deny consent for any search of my person or my property (i.e. car). Granted, I will probably receive a citation if I was speeding or committing some other infraction, but I will have retained my rights.

The only time that I would volunteer that I had a firearm is if I was told to exit the vehicle, and they had better have a damned good reason for the request. Just to make it crystal clear: Police officers are not, and have no wish to be, your "buddy". Police have little interest in being "cool" with you. Unless you are someone that they find especially attractive for some reason, you are probably going to receive a ticket.

I find myself posting this same video every few months. Please watch it. It is amusing, incredibly informative, and especially cogent to this discussion. If you carry a firearm, this should be at the top of your "must see" list.

YouTube - Dont Talk to Police
 

whiskey

(echo_5)
Thank you for your perspective, Boomboy. I enjoy and always welcome INTELLIGENT debates/disagreements.

I guess I have had the good fortune of contact with only "cool" LEOs. I've only not informed once. The cop was a total prick and I didn't want the hassle.

I guess it's in how you carry yoursself, also. Anyone will benefit from a mature and collected attitude

- my $.02
 
Back atcha, Whiskey.

Thank you for your perspective, Boomboy. I enjoy and always welcome INTELLIGENT debates/disagreements.

I guess I have had the good fortune of contact with only "cool" LEOs. I've only not informed once. The cop was a total prick and I didn't want the hassle.

I guess it's in how you carry yoursself, also. Anyone will benefit from a mature and collected attitude

- my $.02

Did you get a chance to watch the video?
 

FN1910

New member
To follow up on my post and agree with boomboy to a point it depends on if there is a a chance that the gun will come into play. I went through a roadsid checkpoin where they were searching for a robber n the are. I had my gun in hte console but my registation was in the clove box. I was able to get everything ready before even getting to the LEO. There was no point in this case for informing him as my gun would not have involved unless something unusual happened.

If I had been carrying it on my side where it could have been seen I would have informed the officer no metter if I was required to or not. If your gun is locked in your trunk there is no need to inform even in states where you have a duty to inform while carrying. The point is how likely is the officer to find out that you have a gun. No surprises is the key.
 

paramedics

paramedics
Boomboy007 I totally agree with this post, be polite, answer the questions asked but do not inform about your gun if is not necessary or asked for.
 
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Military Man

New member
I live in Texas. My ccw is tied to my drivers license. I do not know if An officer stops me out of state if it comes up when he runs my dl. Out of courtesy if I am legal, I will let him know by handing both dl and ccl. If I amnot legal in that state, than I keep my mouth shut and deny them the right to search. If I should get cought with it and in trouble for not telling them about if, If I am not legal, that may be a fifth ammendant problem
 

Sights on Target

New member
When the officer asks for your credentials:

Keep both hands on the wheel,

Look straight ahead,

Respond with "I have a pistol permit and my weapon is (location)",

Thay will tell you how they want you to move/act.

Some take it from you. A few haven't. I've never gotten a ticket :yes2:

Don't use the word "weapon" or "gun". Many police officers will respond negatively to those words. "Firearm" is a much better choice.
 
I asked a Sheriff who is also a friend of mine about how to handle a traffic stop while carrying. His reply was: As soon as we run the plates, it comes up that their is a CCW holder that belongs with that vehicle. So they already know, and you might as well inform them while keeping your hands in plain sight. I asked about my wife driving my vehicle who does not have a CCW and the procedure is the same. Keep your hands in plain sight, inform the officer you do not have a CCW or a weapon on you.
Now if I am the passenger and she is driving it's the same routine, but we both keep our hands in plain sight and she informs the officer that I am the one with the CCW license and carrying. That's when I have to tell the officer I have a CCW license and ask LEO how they want me to proceed. It's a hassle sure, but I can see it from the LEO'S point of view as well. They know there is most likely a loaded Firearm in the vehicle, and they approach cautiously. Now I'll ruffle some feathers: I don't care what state your from, or what they tell you, your on the grid, and they know you have a weapon on you unless you have borrowed a vehicle from somebody that doesn't have a license for Concealed Carry. And even so once you give them your operators license and they run your background it will come up. So for what it's worth be upfront, hands in plain sight and don't make an enemy out of the officer.:pleasantry:
 

mrjam2jab

New member
I asked a Sheriff who is also a friend of mine about how to handle a traffic stop while carrying. His reply was: As soon as we run the plates, it comes up that their is a CCW holder that belongs with that vehicle. So they already know, and you might as well inform them while keeping your hands in plain sight. I asked about my wife driving my vehicle who does not have a CCW and the procedure is the same. Keep your hands in plain sight, inform the officer you do not have a CCW or a weapon on you.
Now if I am the passenger and she is driving it's the same routine, but we both keep our hands in plain sight and she informs the officer that I am the one with the CCW license and carrying. That's when I have to tell the officer I have a CCW license and ask LEO how they want me to proceed.
It's a hassle sure, but I can see it from the LEO'S point of view as well. They know there is most likely a loaded Firearm in the vehicle, and they approach cautiously. Now I'll ruffle some feathers: I don't care what state your from, or what they tell you, your on the grid, and they know you have a weapon on you unless you have borrowed a vehicle from somebody that doesn't have a license for Concealed Carry. And even so once you give them your operators license and they run your background it will come up. So for what it's worth be upfront, hands in plain sight and don't make an enemy out of the officer.:pleasantry:



Following that logic....if you wife is the only person in the car...she still has to say "I am not a CCW holder and am not armed"...??? That's why the CCW should NOT be linked to license plates. What if you, as a non ccw holder, borrow a car from a friend who is a ccw holder...now the LEO is going to think that you are the CCW and expect you to inform him of same...and when you dont...because you dont know anything about that law..........
 
mrjam2jab, yes this is what we have to do here. Even the instructors tell their students: if someone else is going to be driving your car inform them what to do in case of a police stop. BTW I am with you on this one, except I don't think it should be linked to anything. But like the Social Security number which was never supposed to be used for I.D. it is anyway.
 

Anthony_I_Am

New member
"Hi Officer, there with my drivers license is my carry permit. It is on my (left, right) hip, inside the waistband. I didn't want you to be alarmed if you happen to see it when i reach for the registration in the glove box."


Personally, I never saw the need for all the long speeches. Simply hand them your permit with your drivers license. If they have any further questions about your concerns for their being alarmed, or where the gun is, etc. they'll ask. The less talking you do (SEE THE VIDEO IN THE POST ABOVE), the less chance you're going to say something you shouldn't have.











.
 

utimmer43

New member
I asked a Sheriff who is also a friend of mine about how to handle a traffic stop while carrying. His reply was: As soon as we run the plates, it comes up that their is a CCW holder that belongs with that vehicle. So they already know, and you might as well inform them while keeping your hands in plain sight. I asked about my wife driving my vehicle who does not have a CCW and the procedure is the same. Keep your hands in plain sight, inform the officer you do not have a CCW or a weapon on you.
Now if I am the passenger and she is driving it's the same routine, but we both keep our hands in plain sight and she informs the officer that I am the one with the CCW license and carrying. That's when I have to tell the officer I have a CCW license and ask LEO how they want me to proceed. It's a hassle sure, but I can see it from the LEO'S point of view as well. They know there is most likely a loaded Firearm in the vehicle, and they approach cautiously. Now I'll ruffle some feathers: I don't care what state your from, or what they tell you, your on the grid, and they know you have a weapon on you unless you have borrowed a vehicle from somebody that doesn't have a license for Concealed Carry. And even so once you give them your operators license and they run your background it will come up. So for what it's worth be upfront, hands in plain sight and don't make an enemy out of the officer.:pleasantry:
Not to ruffle any feathers, and with all due respect... This thread was Connecticut specific, a state which does not require notification. I'm not sure weather they connect it to your DL or registration, but I suspect that they do not.

You being from Ohio, it goes without saying that you absolutely should inform. And yes, it is probably wise to let someone know what they should expect if they are borrowing your car. Here in PA, (or in CT, if that is where I happen to be) I honestly don't care what a LEOs preference is.
 

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