Carrying as a non-immigrant


BritStudent

New member
Hi,

First some background. I've just turned 21, and I'm a British student at a university here in the UK. I finish my degree next year and I'm planning on coming to the US to do my Phd and eventually stay there permanently. There's many reasons I want to study in the US, and many reasons I'd like to move, but one of them is that I believe in the right to defend one's self and in the United States people enjoy the right to carry the tools to defend themselves if, god forbid, they should need to. A luxury I do not enjoy in my own country but would like to share.

I'm looking at universities in several states, but one of the most likely spots for me to touch down is Duke in Durham, North Carolina, so I'll use this as a sort of example. A Phd course takes 5 years usually, so I'll be there a while. I can't get a green card until I can get an offer of employment, which means finishing my Phd. So for those 5 years I'll be a non-immigrant.

Now I've been told that only citizens and immigrants (i.e. green card holders) can own guns at all, let alone get CCW permits. This comes from the Federal law:

(d) It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise
dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person
knowing or
having reasonable cause to believe that such person -

[...]

(5) who, being an alien -
(A) is illegally or unlawfully in the United States; or
(B) except as provided in subsection (y)(2), has been
admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa
(as
that term is defined in section 101(a)(26) of the Immigration
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(26)));

Note the exemption for subsection (y)(2). That section reads:

(y) Provisions Relating to Aliens Admitted Under Nonimmigrant
Visas. -

[...]

(2) Exceptions. - Subsections (d)(5)(B), (g)(5)(B), and
(s)(3)(B)(v)(II) do not apply to any alien who has been lawfully
admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa, if that
alien is -

(A) admitted to the United States for lawful hunting or
sporting purposes or is in possession of a hunting license or
permit lawfully issued in the United States;

So, if a non-immigrant has a US hunting license, he can own guns. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission website says re: hunting licenses:

What if I am a non-resident student attending college in North Carolina?

Nonresident students may purchase a resident license while attending a university, college, or community college in NC.

So, as far as I can tell, I can get a hunting license, legally own firearms and, since NC has no law against it, carry them openly. So first, question: Am I correct so far?

Assuming I am, that's great, and leads to a couple of further questions:

How concealed is 'concealed'? (concealed being what I'd need to avoid, in order to keep it legal without a CCW permit) Could I wear the gun outside-the-waistband under a jacket or shirt thus concealing it from the rear and side, but leaving it visible from the front? Or do I need to keep it in 100% plain view e.g. OWB without a jacket, drop leg when wearing a jacket, etc?

However, while that's all good to know, I'd much rather carry concealed if possible.

Unfortunately, the Durham County Government website says re: CCW permits:

The applicant must be a citizen of the United States...

Now, Arizona, for example, says the following:

Applicants must:
be a resident of this state or a United States citizen;

And clarifies:

State Prohibitors
ARS 13-3101(6) - Prohibited possessor
means any person -


[...]

who is an undocumented alien or a nonimmigrant alien traveling with or without documentation in this state for business or pleasure or who is studying in this state and who maintains a foreign residence abroad. This subdivision does not apply to:
Nonimmigrant aliens who possess a valid hunting license or permit that is lawfully issued by a state in the United States.

So if I were in Arizona, once I've been there 90 days (which, I believe, makes me a resident, if not a permanent one but it does not specify permanent) and got my hunting license, so far as I can tell, I could get a CCW. Again, am I right?

Assuming I am, unfortunately I'm not going to Arizona! Since I'm not a citizen, I can't get an Arizona permit unless I live there.

So what I need to find is:

Somewhere that will issue non-citizens who are residents in other states, non-resident permits, and that has reciprocity in NC. I'm sure there must be somewhere, since most states let non-citizens in their own state get a permit, surely one law will be written "a resident of the United States" instead of "a resident of this state or a citizen".

OR, somewhere in NC that will issue to residents of NC who are not citizens. I'm not sure if that's actually law, or just county policy.

So, can anyone point me in the direction of states I might have some luck with?

I'll just add, before anyone points it out, that I know NC does not allow carry on educational property. Obviously, not all my time is spent on campus!

EDIT:

Utah may be the state I'm looking for?

http://www.le.utah.gov/UtahCode/getCodeSection?code=53-5-704

I see no residency or citizenship requirement in there. Can someone confirm?
 

Tucker's Mom

New member
I may be wrong but I read somewhere recently, if not here...perhaps USCCA, that you have to be a resident of Utah to apply for a permit there...there are some states where you can apply as a non-resident but you got to be a legal immigrant first, papers needed to show for it and trainings taken, e.g., Florida law for non-immigrant.
 
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BritStudent

New member
I may be wrong but I read somewhere recently, if not here...perhaps USCCA, that you have to be a resident of Utah to apply for a permit there...there are some states where you can apply as a non-resident but you got to be a legal immigrant first, papers needed to show for it and trainings taken, e.g., Florida law for non-immigrant.

The Utah Department of Public Safety says:

Do I have to be a Utah resident to obtain a concealed firearm permit?

No. Any U.S. citizen may obtain a Utah concealed firearm permit, providing they meet the minimum qualifications.

Now they say any U.S. citizen, but this is, I think, just because a non-citizen, non- resident getting one is such an unusual, perhaps unheard of situation. If you read the actual law for CCW permits in Utah there is no requirement for citizenship or residency. The law says they must issue an applicant a CCW if they are 21 years of age or older (I am), within 60 days, unless they can prove that the applicant is not of good character, with a list of things that satisfactorily demonstrate good character. Every item on the list applies to me. The only one concerning citizenship is:

(viii) is qualified to purchase and possess a firearm pursuant to Section 76-10-503 and federal law.

That Utah law's (Section 76-10-503) only mention of citizenship is that it is illegal to possess guns if the following applies to you:

(viii) is an alien who is illegally or unlawfully in the United States;

Since I will be legally and lawfully in the United States, I am qualified to purchase and possess a firearm pursuant to Section 76-10-503. I am also qualified under federal law as I explained in my original post because I will have a hunting license, which exempts me from the federal bar on non-resident aliens.

So, usually a non-resident would be barred from getting a Utah CCW because they're not qualified to possess guns under federal law. But I will be, so I qualify under federal law and meet all the other requirements for good character.

So far as I can see there's nothing in law that would allow Utah to deny me a CCW permit, even though their website implies (though, to be fair, doesn't specifically state that) citizenship is a requirement for non-Utah-residents.

Most American "students" are not rich and they get part-time work even if they have student loans and grants. As an English candidate for a PhD, you can and should get a job.
I presume you are using a British student loan so don't want to screw the pooch until you have your sheepskin.

I'm not rich either. Here in the UK I'd need to save up for years to be able to afford to do a Phd fulltime, there is no student loan or grant for education beyond undergraduate, but American universities are much better funded. Duke, for example, offers funding to 90% of its Phd students. That includes a full tuition waiver, a $17,000 a year stipend, and $2,000 of summer funding. I've looked at apartment rents in the area around campus and assuming other living costs are the same as in Britain (in reality I reckon they'll be lower) I'm pretty sure I can live on that.

Conditional on receiving that funding, though, is that I'll be working up to 20 hours a week as a teaching or research assistant. This is normal in US universities from what I can tell, and I consider that part of my education - learning to teach and so on.

If I need an additional part time job for financial reasons then I'll look into that, but I can't imagine that would allow me to get a green card. That requires the employer offering the job to get a labor certification from the Department of Labor, stating that an American could not be found to fill the position. If I'm stacking shelves at Walmart or serving coffee in a university cafe they're not going to be able to do that, since anyone could do those jobs.
 
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gdcleanfun

Banned
How concealed is 'concealed'? (concealed being what I'd need to avoid, in order to keep it legal without a CCW permit) Could I wear the gun outside-the-waistband under a jacket or shirt thus concealing it from the rear and side, but leaving it visible from the front? Or do I need to keep it in 100% plain view e.g. OWB without a jacket, drop leg when wearing a jacket, etc?

However, while that's all good to know, I'd much rather carry concealed if possible.


How concealed is concealed? Concealed is concealed is concealed and generally you need a CCW (or a conceal-carry permit) to conceal your firearm on your person, whether it's concealed under one layer of clothing or 3 layers, in your hat, in your backpack or briefcase, or hiding in your hand. If it's concealed so that the general public cannot see it when looking at you then it's considered concealed.

That said, the laws vary from state to state, and they vary from citizens to aliens. Everything I'm writing may not apply to you at all. It's up to you to do your own research, not rely on my words.

Now, in Nevada, we can conceal our firearms in our vehicles while we drive without first obtaining and possessing a CCW. However, If do not have that CCW, and we conceal our firearms on our bodies while inside our vehicles, then we are committing a crime. Other states, such as California, do not like it's citizens having a firearm on your person or in the vehicle at all, open or concealed.

That said, even though some states allow open carry, some businesses do not like it. It's their prerogative to refuse service to you and they can trespass you, meaning they will escort you out the door and bar you from patronizing their establishment until you are firearm-free. Again, here in Nevada, it's legal to open carry into a bank and into a casino, though most people won't do that.

I'm not an LEO, but my personal recommendation is that you be careful where you open carry, and be doubly careful to not conceal anything, nothing, nowhere, no how, no time, nada, until you become very familiar with the laws of the state in which you intend to reside and the federal laws that govern you as an immigrant or a non-immigrant.
 

BritStudent

New member
How concealed is concealed? Concealed is concealed is concealed and generally you need a CCW (or a conceal-carry permit) to conceal your firearm on your person, whether it's concealed under one layer of clothing or 3 layers, in your hat, in your backpack or briefcase, or hiding in your hand. If it's concealed so that the general public cannot see it when looking at you then it's considered concealed.

This is what I mean (photochop):

Link Removed

Anyone I was talking with would be able to see it. People walking towards me on the street would be able to see it. But it wouldn't be visible from certain angles. Does that look like open carry? According to opencarry.org Link Removed.

Another option I thought of apart from a drop leg holster, if belt carry with a jacket (11:30 o'clock or so) isn't acceptable would be to attach a holster to a shoulder bag like so:

Link Removed

But like I say, hopefully I can get a CCW so I won't need to OC.
 

Tucker's Mom

New member
Now they say any U.S. citizen, but this is, I think, just because a non-citizen, non- resident getting one is such an unusual, perhaps unheard of situation. If you read the actual law for CCW permits in Utah there is no requirement for citizenship or residency. The law says they must issue an applicant a CCW if they are 21 years of age or older (I am), within 60 days, unless they can prove that the applicant is not of good character, with a list of things that satisfactorily demonstrate good character. Every item on the list applies to me. The only one concerning citizenship is:
...snipped some parts...sorry...
Try applying in Florida...You do not have to be a resident there to apply and you do not have to be a citizen of the US either.
(I think you have to be a resident of another state to qualify though...+ the usual qualifications e.g., CCW training certificates, etc.)
 

lplettie

New member
This is what I mean (photochop):

Link Removed

Anyone I was talking with would be able to see it. People walking towards me on the street would be able to see it. But it wouldn't be visible from certain angles. Does that look like open carry? According to opencarry.org Link Removed.

Another option I thought of apart from a drop leg holster, if belt carry with a jacket (11:30 o'clock or so) isn't acceptable would be to attach a holster to a shoulder bag like so:

Link Removed

But like I say, hopefully I can get a CCW so I won't need to OC.


From the pictures you posted I would have to say that, in most locations in the US, those weapons would be too concealed to qualify as open carry and too visible to qualify as concealed carry. It seems that you want to walk a very thin line... one that's too thin even for citizens. Carrying in those manners will cause you grief from the authorities.

The bag idea (picture 2) is just asking for someone to snatch and grab your piece.... among other things.
 

RugerP345

New member
North Carolina laws are screwed way up. You can possess and own a gun (as a non-immigrant) but your can't (legally) buy one in North Carolina. You have to be a citizen or a permanent resident alien (with a green card) to purchase. HOWEVER, you can travel to one of the gun shows in Virginia, or many of the flea markets) and buy a gun. You cannot buy one from a delaer, as you would have to fill out the 4473, but you can purchase one from an individual. This isn't illegal, just the way it is. Even if you purchase a handgun from a non-licensed person (private sale) you still have to get a permit from the N.C. sheriff, and will have to prove residency or citizenship.

Now so far as carrying you gun, you can do that in North Carolina openly. We have no law prohibiting open carry of an unconcealed weapon. But you can't carry it in Cary, on school property (college) and other places indicated in the NC firearms laws.

You won't be able to get a concealed handgun permit (in NC) without being a permanent resident alien or citizen. I don't know about other states permits. I know that you cannot get a non-resident Virginia permit unless you are a citizen or a permanent resident alien.

If was gonna make a choice like yours, I'd go for ARIZONA. Vermont also allows open or concealed carry without any formal red tape. If you aren't a crook, you can open or concealed carry in Vermont.

I'm not a lawyer, so double check the above before making any decisions. Open carrying in NC can get you some strange looks from others and some places might ask you to leave, but it is not illegal.









.
 

Jim_Macklin

New member
North Carolina laws are screwed way up. You can possess and own a gun (as a non-immigrant) but your can't (legally) buy one in North Carolina. You have to be a citizen or a permanent resident alien (with a green card) to purchase. HOWEVER, you can travel to one of the gun shows in Virginia, or many of the flea markets) and buy a gun. You cannot buy one from a delaer, as you would have to fill out the 4473, but you can purchase one from an individual. This isn't illegal, just the way it is. Even if you purchase a handgun from a non-licensed person (private sale) you still have to get a permit from the N.C. sheriff, and will have to prove residency or citizenship.

Now so far as carrying you gun, you can do that in North Carolina openly. We have no law prohibiting open carry of an unconcealed weapon. But you can't carry it in Cary, on school property (college) and other places indicated in the NC firearms laws.

You won't be able to get a concealed handgun permit (in NC) without being a permanent resident alien or citizen. I don't know about other states permits. I know that you cannot get a non-resident Virginia permit unless you are a citizen or a permanent resident alien.

If was gonna make a choice like yours, I'd go for ARIZONA. Vermont also allows open or concealed carry without any formal red tape. If you aren't a crook, you can open or concealed carry in Vermont.

I'm not a lawyer, so double check the above before making any decisions. Open carrying in NC can get you some strange looks from others and some places might ask you to leave, but it is not illegal.

.
It is a federal violation to but a handgun in a state different bfrom your residence unless it is shippoed to a dealer [FFL] in your state of residence for completion of paperwork.
ATF Online - Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
 

BritStudent

New member
Try applying in Florida...You do not have to be a resident there to apply and you do not have to be a citizen of the US either.
(I think you have to be a resident of another state to qualify though...+ the usual qualifications e.g., CCW training certificates, etc.)

Thanks for the tip. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services website says you need to be a permenant resident with documentation from the USCIS, but the text of the law says you must only be a "resident of the United States," which I believe I will qualify as (either after 90 days of residency, which is how state residency works, or after at least 183 days of residency in the US in the past 3 years, which is how it works for tax purposes I believe, I'll probably have to ask a lawyer to find out which applies). In any case I've emailed them to ask them to clarify the discrepancy.

From the pictures you posted I would have to say that, in most locations in the US, those weapons would be too concealed to qualify as open carry and too visible to qualify as concealed carry. It seems that you want to walk a very thin line... one that's too thin even for citizens. Carrying in those manners will cause you grief from the authorities.

The bag idea (picture 2) is just asking for someone to snatch and grab your piece.... among other things.

Thanks. Re: the bag, good point. I had not thought of that. If I have to open carry I'll stick to a drop leg when wearing a jacket then.

North Carolina laws are screwed way up. You can possess and own a gun (as a non-immigrant) but your can't (legally) buy one in North Carolina. You have to be a citizen or a permanent resident alien (with a green card) to purchase.

This would normally be correct but I believe there is an exemption I can use. The North Carolina Department of Justice has a publication, Link Removed. In the section regarding the issuance 'pistol permits' it reads:

As previously mentioned, federal law prohibits aliens who are illegally in the United
States from receiving or possessing firearms. Additionally, subject to certain exceptions,
aliens who are in a non-immigrant status are prohibited from possessing or receiving
firearms. 18 U.S.C. § 922(d)(5) Therefore, sheriffs must make additional inquiries of
applicants for pistol purchase permits to determine their alien status. The sheriff must first
determine if the applicant is a citizen. If the applicant is not a citizen, the sheriff must
obtain additional information on the person to include their country of citizenship; place
of birth; and alien or admission number. If applicable ,the sheriff may have to determine
the basis of any claimed exemption from the non-immigrant alien prohibition. For
example, a non-immigrant alien could possess or receive a firearm if he/she is in possession
of a valid hunting license issued in the United States
; is an official representative of a
foreign government accredited to the United States; or has received a waiver by the United
States Attorney General. 18 U.S.C. § 922(y)[/b]

I will be getting a hunting license and none of the other prohibitors apply to me e.g. illegal alien, adjudicated mental defective etc. So I believe I can in fact purchase a handgun from an FFL in North Carolina.

If was gonna make a choice like yours, I'd go for ARIZONA. Vermont also allows open or concealed carry without any formal red tape. If you aren't a crook, you can open or concealed carry in Vermont.

I am limited in where I can study in that I need a graduate school which offers both a generous funding package, a tolerable climate for my Anglo Saxon heritage (i.e. any further south than NC and I'll be swimming to class instead of walking) and a world class doctorate program, as well as preferably being gun friendly. Unfortunately 'top graduate school' and 'gun friendly' are hard to put together. Other states I'm looking at academically include NY (Rochester, Cornell), RI (Brown), CT (Yale), PA (Carnegie Mellon), MI (U of Michigan), MA (U of Minnesota) and NJ (Princeton). I know they're all either shall issue or may issue states, but I haven't looked in depth at the technical, legal possibility of OC and CCW except in NC. Over the next few weeks I'm working through all the details of funding and living expenses and stuff like that to narrow down where I'm going to apply to. Gun laws will be on the list.
 

Jim_Macklin

New member
Utah has some good schools, and allows licensed person to carry on campus. But even in states that have "shall issue" concealed carry laws, carrying a gun, open or concealed on a campus is generally grounds for expulsion by the school, even a a crime has not been committed.
In addition, many if not most colleges ban arms within college housing and dorms.

BTW, what is your major?
 

BritStudent

New member
Utah has some good schools, and allows licensed person to carry on campus. But even in states that have "shall issue" concealed carry laws, carrying a gun, open or concealed on a campus is generally grounds for expulsion by the school, even a a crime has not been committed.
In addition, many if not most colleges ban arms within college housing and dorms.

BTW, what is your major?

I won't be carrying in campus unless it's legal and permitted by the school which, as you say, is not the case anywhere I'm likely to be going (unless this Campus Carry thing takes off soon). But I would like to be able to carry at other times. I won't be living on campus I don't think, I'll be in private accommodation.

I'm studying economics, which is what I'll be doing my doctorate in (given the general opinion of economists in the current climate, you can see I have need of protection!).

As I'm posting, according to the Link Removed (where Brown is), the only set-in-stone requirement is to not be disqualified from possessing a firearm under state or federal law, which I don't believe I will be with a hunting license. I've heard RI called 'shall issue' state but it seems the Attorney General can turn me down on whim so while I don't believe there's any specific reason I can't get a permit there, I'm not sure what my chances are.
 

gdcleanfun

Banned
This is what I mean (photochop):

Link Removed

Anyone I was talking with would be able to see it. People walking towards me on the street would be able to see it. But it wouldn't be visible from certain angles. Does that look like open carry? According to opencarry.org Link Removed.

Another option I thought of apart from a drop leg holster, if belt carry with a jacket (11:30 o'clock or so) isn't acceptable would be to attach a holster to a shoulder bag like so:

Link Removed

But like I say, hopefully I can get a CCW so I won't need to OC.

You would have to check the laws of the state in which you want to carry. I don't think that splitting hairs is what you need to do when deciding if open carry is really open, or if it's concealed. That can land you in jail quite quickly. Just my opinion, yours and other's may vary.
 

Jim_Macklin

New member
I won't be carrying in campus unless it's legal and permitted by the school which, as you say, is not the case anywhere I'm likely to be going (unless this Campus Carry thing takes off soon). But I would like to be able to carry at other times. I won't be living on campus I don't think, I'll be in private accommodation.

I'm studying economics, which is what I'll be doing my doctorate in (given the general opinion of economists in the current climate, you can see I have need of protection!).

As I'm posting, according to the Link Removed (where Brown is), the only set-in-stone requirement is to not be disqualified from possessing a firearm under state or federal law, which I don't believe I will be with a hunting license. I've heard RI called 'shall issue' state but it seems the Attorney General can turn me down on whim so while I don't believe there's any specific reason I can't get a permit there, I'm not sure what my chances are.
Nothing wrong with econ, as long as you're not in the George Soros School.

BTW, maybe you can answer a question that has puzzled me. With government creating inlation to discount their old debt and printing fiat currency to finance new circuses, why do the people who have the gold want to sell it to the people who have only paper?

Maybe the answer is for you to convert a student visa to an immigrant status and become an American citizen and leave England to sink into total [instead of 90% sunk] disorder.
 

BritStudent

New member
Nothing wrong with econ, as long as you're not in the George Soros School.

BTW, maybe you can answer a question that has puzzled me. With government creating inlation to discount their old debt and printing fiat currency to finance new circuses, why do the people who have the gold want to sell it to the people who have only paper?

Maybe the answer is for you to convert a student visa to an immigrant status and become an American citizen and leave England to sink into total [instead of 90% sunk] disorder.

I intend to. I'm definitely going to look into getting a green card (and then citizenship) as soon as possible but I think I will have to wait until after I complete my Phd. As far as I know it's not possible to convert a student visa into a green card, to get a green card I need an offer of employment from an American employer who can prove that they can't find any native workers to fill the position. As an undergraduate coming straight out of university, my only previous jobs being unskilled (shop work, phone work etc) I can't see that happening. Unless anyone here has a job going for me? :biggrin:

As to why people sell gold, why do people sell any stock? Cash is more convenient. People don't want gold stocks any more than they want fiat currency, what people really want is Cadillacs and flat screens. You can't buy a flat screen with a bar of gold, at least not in most places, but you can with currency. You can easily convert cash into any form of wealth you wish, be it a Big Mac, a yacht, or a share in Apple. You can deposit it in banks, write cheques against it, wire it to people, debit it out via PayPal, pay bills with it, pay taxes with it and pay debts. Cash is highly liquid (it is liquid) but gold has transaction costs, and in some cases impossibilities, associated with it. The same reasons apply as to why people do not buy their groceries with shares in General Motors shares or bonds. Instead people hold a portion of their wealth in stocks, bonds and other illiquid assets to grow their wealth, and keep the rest as cash or deposits to handle their spending needs. The more a person spends over a given period of time, the larger the proportion of their wealth they will hold in cash.

Whether a gold standard is preferable to a fiat currency system is a weighty question that economists are divided on. Personally I'm not certain either way, and I think that goes for many others too. One of the reasons I prefer microeconomics to macroeconomics, macroeconomics isn't very good at being predictive!
 

S&WM&P40

New member
Your more then welcome in the US but leave your Gun hating trash talking hating America crap in that rat hole they call the UK. As for carrying with out being a us citizen and with out a green card I would steer clear of the east coast ( MA,NY,NJ.RI) Cops in those states are huge ass holes and would eat you alive. As for the photo you posted of carrying the gun up front with your jacket on. Be vary careful if that's how your going to carry that way with out a CWP if your jacket covers the gun for a second that's all they would need to arrest you ( in my state anyway) but it's like that in many others. Alaska and Vermont would be a good bet for you they do not use a permit system and anyone can carry concealed or open.
 

billwot

New member
But you can't carry it in Cary, ...


Chapel Hill also disallowed both open and concealed carry, but as of 6/21/96, NC (state) gun laws generally pre-empt local ordinances.

"Effective June 21, 1996, a new Article 53B was enacted which provides that with certain exceptions the field of firearms regulations is preempted from regulation by local goivernments"

Link Removed

The link should take you to the the Atty General's (Roy Cooper) complete summry of the NC gun laws. My quote is from P. 17.

bill

bill
 

Blogengeezer

New member
Welcome to 'The States' Brit. Check out filling your residency on 'The Rez' (including Arizona). The Indian Reservations of the Southwest are always open for Medical professionals. New Mexico is a popular place to come for the 'Canucks'. New Mexico is definitely Rough around the edges, but great scenery and excellent travel opportunities. WE all Carry in New Mexico (most of our legislature including our Gov is Certified CCW. By it's nature, CCW does not encourage 'Interest' from the wrong parties.

The Anglo-Saxons harassed Demoralized Roman Legions out of Britain, after 400 years of Armed Occupancy. The Well Understood law of the 'Seaxe Armed' ANG-SAX.."The Man With a Sword, Is a Free Man...the Man Without, is...a Slave"..
 

kengrubb

New member
You might wish to consider the UW (pronounced U-Dub), WSU (pronounced Wazzu), or any of Washington state's other fine Universities.

Here on the Wet, I mean West side of the state, the weather is much more like home for you. Over on the East side, it's more desert like.

Read through RCW (Revised Code of Washington) 9.41.173 and information on the DOL (Department of Licensing) website about an Link Removed.

Who must have an alien firearms license?

Any non-immigrant alien who is temporarily living in Washington, such as Students on temporary school visas.
...
Can I apply for a concealed pistol license if I have an alien firearms license?

Yes.

If you're interesting, drop in and join the WA-CCW List on Yahoo Groups. Lots of very knowledgeable folks there including Dave Workman (NRA and Gunweek) and Joe Waldron (CCRKBA).
 

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