Carry pistols for recoil sensitive


Right now, I carry a Kel-Tec PF9. The recoil has never bothered me, but my Dad had severe wrist pain when he shot it. He only got 2 rounds through and had to quit. I've been experiencing more pain in my fingers and some in my wrists, but not to the point where I cannot shoot. It may well be coming. I know there is a shotgun that has no recoil (forgotten the name, it is also fully auto). I'm not an engineer, but is it the case that pistols are simply too small to develop that kind of engineering (low or no recoil)?
 

bofh

Banned
Go to a range that rents handguns and try them out. Go with a larger-size handgun, as the weight will dampen the recoil. Also, handguns that enable a high grip (and/or have a low bore axis) have less recoil, e.g., Glocks. See Chuck Hawks | Handgun Recoil Table.

I am not going much into the no-recoil comment. There are compensators and there is the recoilless rifle. A full-auto shotgun with no recoil? Never heard of it.
 

PAcarrier

New member
I carry a Glock 32, which has a reasonable amount of horsepower. Yet, I also own a Kel-Tec PF9 for deep cover situations and I can tell you that I don't look forward to a range day with it...ever.

The PF9 is light and thin - wonderful for carrying. But those same factors beat you up at the range.

For your Dad, maybe think about a 1911, especially in 9mm and I think you'll see much better results.
 

PAcarrier

New member
Go to a range that rents handguns and try them out. Go with a larger-size handgun, as the weight will dampen the recoil. Also, handguns that enable a high grip (and/or have a low bore axis) have less recoil, e.g., Glocks. See Chuck Hawks | Handgun Recoil Table.

I am not going much into the no-recoil comment. There are compensators and there is the recoilless rifle. A full-auto shotgun with no recoil? Never heard of it.

Great resource from Chuck - thanks for that!
 

cluznar

New member
Try a .22 mag Ruger LCR revolver or maybe a Kel Tec P-32 .32 acp. Both are rounds with little recoil. :dirol:
 

AnthemBassMan

Ohio Farmboy!
The Glock 42 is a pretty soft shooting .380. You could also look into a .38 Spl revolver using wadcutter target loads.

L8R,
Matt
 

missoak

Member
I carry a Glock 32, which has a reasonable amount of horsepower. Yet, I also own a Kel-Tec PF9 for deep cover situations and I can tell you that I don't look forward to a range day with it...ever.

The PF9 is light and thin - wonderful for carrying. But those same factors beat you up at the range.

For your Dad, maybe think about a 1911, especially in 9mm and I think you'll see much better results.
I agree with a 9mm 1911. Amazing how well the recoil is absorbed with the heavy mass of the gun.
 

Wild Dog

Banned
If you're too worried about recoil then I suggest you get one of these:
Link Removed

And don't hand me that broken wrist stuff. Part of being a man is sucking it up and doing what you got to do to survive the battle and annihilate the enemy, or at least go down shooting like a man.
 

Blueshell

Banned
Right now, I carry a Kel-Tec PF9. The recoil has never bothered me, but my Dad had severe wrist pain when he shot it. He only got 2 rounds through and had to quit. I've been experiencing more pain in my fingers and some in my wrists, but not to the point where I cannot shoot. It may well be coming. I know there is a shotgun that has no recoil (forgotten the name, it is also fully auto). I'm not an engineer, but is it the case that pistols are simply too small to develop that kind of engineering (low or no recoil)?
I'm gona go a different direction and suggest you consider heavier, all steel guns, longer barrels (5"+), and possibly ports.

-Weight absorbs recoil.
-A longer barrel will give you improved balistic performance should you choose to go with lighter amunition for the reduced kick.
-Ported barrels reduce muzzle flip but fair warning: in certain close situations the ports can end up blowing gas up into your face. This one is certainly a mixed bag. Fortunately, however, you can swap out barrels easily.
 

bofh

Banned
Ported barrels reduce muzzle flip but fair warning: in certain close situations the ports can end up blowing gas up into your face. This one is certainly a mixed bag. Fortunately, however, you can swap out barrels easily.

A few comments about ported barrels:

They do reduce muzzle flip, but they also reduce ammunition performance. A ported barrel vents gas before the bullet exits the barrel, essentially reducing the pressure in comparison to a non-ported barrel of the same length. Therefore, a ported barrel has essentially the performance of a shorter barrel. How much shorter? That depends on the location and size of the ports.

The S&W Performance Center Shield, for example, has a ported barrel. The barrel is 3.1 inches long and the 2 ports at 10 and 2 o'clock start about 0.47 inches from the muzzle. Each oval port is about 0.31x0.15 inches. That reduces the performance of the barrel to something like 2.7 inches (WAG). Standard 9mm JHP loads are designed for 4 or 4.5 inch barrels. The Speer LE Gold Dot Duty ammo that’s rated at 1,200 fps out of a service-size semi-auto clocked in at an average of only 1,063 from the ported Shield.

The gas in your face problem really doesn't exist. Most of the gas is still vented through the muzzle. It is the same as shooting a handgun with a shorter barrel. If you can handle the gas of a snub-nose revolver or mouse semi-auto, then you can handle the gas of a larger ported firearm.

Some people argue that ported barrels increase the flash in the line of sight problem, creating issues while shooting in low-light conditions. That's also not true. Good self defense ammo is loaded with low-flash powder anyway.
 

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