carry on a motorcycle?


nraynes

New member
I just got my motorcycle licence, and a gift from my dad of a 1989 Yamaha Radian.
My question is is there a way any of you know, and like the best to carry on a motorcycle?
 

Fallguy

Citizen
As the others I usually carry same way as normal. On a rare occasion I may use a shoulder holster.
 

champr

New member
Item to concider

I agree with the other comments but one item to think about is having to draw while riding. If you are right handed you will have to take your hand off the throttle to draw. Several LEOs have told me you need to be able to draw with your left hand. I see thier point. I still carry the same on and off the bike myself, but just wanted to point out other things to think about. if you are going to carry to draw with the left hand ensure you practice that way.
 

nraynes

New member
Drawing with your left is a good point. The good thing is I am ambidextrous and usually carry ina way that I can draw with either hand (modified back harness).
 

Phillip Gain

New member
I agree with the other comments but one item to think about is having to draw while riding. If you are right handed you will have to take your hand off the throttle to draw. Several LEOs have told me you need to be able to draw with your left hand. I see thier point. I still carry the same on and off the bike myself, but just wanted to point out other things to think about. if you are going to carry to draw with the left hand ensure you practice that way.

Before I begin this small rant - I'm speaking from 28 years' experience shooting, and 19 years' experience riding.

Let's not be ridiculous. You are not Mad Max. This is not Bartertown. No way are you going to be drawing your firearm with your left hand while shooting from your bike. That kind of crap is best left to stuntmen.

If you find yourself in a situation while riding - it is best resolved with a suitable application of throttle or brake as appropriate.

With that said...you SHOULD practice drawing and firing with your off hand, but from your usual mode of carry. This becomes a real possibility if your shooting arm is injured in a mugging or similar situation.
 

localgirl

New member
Before I begin this small rant - I'm speaking from 28 years' experience shooting, and 19 years' experience riding.

Let's not be ridiculous. You are not Mad Max. This is not Bartertown. No way are you going to be drawing your firearm with your left hand while shooting from your bike. That kind of crap is best left to stuntmen.

If you find yourself in a situation while riding - it is best resolved with a suitable application of throttle or brake as appropriate.

With that said...you SHOULD practice drawing and firing with your off hand, but from your usual mode of carry. This becomes a real possibility if your shooting arm is injured in a mugging or similar situation.

He rides a motorcycle too?!
 

nraynes

New member
I agree that you won't be ridding and shooting but you might still need to twist the throttle and get out of there.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
I'll agree with philip...what scenario will you be drawing while riding that wouldn't be better to just get out if there quick?

Be aware of the laws as well. I am waiting on my new cpl, and I can not carry a loaded weapon in or on a vehicle.

What is your state laws on printing?

I find open carry, 3-4 o'clock more comfortable while riding
 

unwiredmedic

New member
I'm not downing you here, just trying to add some practicality, so just consider this before you make your decision.

I read an article once that basically said, "Drive, or Shoot, but don't do both." They both require far too much concentration to make them safe activities and you don't want to shoot an innocent and cause (or be in) a wreck too. You are probably far too inexperienced a rider to have mastered this limitation yet, given you just got your license, and you are on a new-to-you bike. My experience is that riding requires more concentration than driving a car, if for nothing else other than to keep everyone else on the road from running you down. If you were wearing your leathers (yes, even in the heat) it would definitely interfere with your ability to safely draw anyway, and you certainly don't want to drop it on the roadway. Are your gloves going to interfere with your grip and ability to pull the trigger? In the summer and the winter?

One other consideration. Are you going to reconfigure your carry from right side to left side to get on and ride, then reconfigure back to right side when you get off? Are you going to be able to do this without drawing attention to the fact that you are carrying (and without getting a visit from PD every time for brandishing or anonymous Man With A Gun called in by a concerned citizen)? Are you going to practice left handed draw for proficiency, and then practice while you are riding, for proficiency?

A story from an officer who went down on his bike, off duty... he advocates the SERPA holster, which took the brunt of the road scraping and left his sidearm without a scratch on it, and probably protected his hip from meeting the pavement too. I'm sure any comparable material to the SERPA is just as good.

Actually, thanks for starting this post, because although I have ridden for few years, I now have my CCW permit and haven't taken time to ponder this very same argument.
 

Phillip Gain

New member
Ride or shoot?

This article came to my attention yesterday. I think you'll find it relevant to this thread. I find it particularly relevant because it happened 2 days ago, about 20 minutes from my apartment:

Worcester Telegram & Gazette - telegram.com - Motorcyclist beaten, stripped, robbed

It's certainly thought-provoking. While NO ONE can say for sure that being armed would have helped the rider (since none of us were there, and there are a lot of variables) there are a few questions that come to mind:

  • Could the driver have sped off? Perhaps "split lanes" to get to the intersection, then done a "right turn on red" onto the shoulder, using it as a getaway lane? Remember, when there's danger, those lines are just there for guidance They aren't jersey barriers. (Ride OR shoot? Choice is to ride.)

  • Had the driver been armed, perhaps he could have defended himself? My initial thought would be (upon seeing the first armed assailant) to hit the kill switch, drop the bike while dismounting, present firearm, and start shooting. This is assuming that riding off isn't an option for whatever reason. (Ride OR shoot? Choice is to shoot.)

  • Or perhaps a better idea would have been to stay atop the bike, firing at the armed assailant? It leaves open the option of dismounting/dropping if you can't ride and have to run. It also leaves open the option of stuffing your firearm into your jacket and riding off once the traffic starts moving (which may happen quickly once shots are fired). This scenario could be described as "Shoot THEN ride."

I certainly don't have the answers. Again, one's action would have to depend on the situation. But it's certainly worth more thought and discussion.
 

Rocketgeezer

New member
I can tell this is a subject that probably will never go away, that being said, I have been riding licensed for 43 years, and carrying a weapon while riding for quite some time, and I will say the best option if a car is giving you crap while your on your bike is to get away, if you are not expereanced enough for this, and depending on who's doing the chasing, most riders are not, your next best option would be to stop your bike, and be ready to use youe weapon again depending on the situation, even most morons would beat it out of there upon seeing the gun, shooting from the bike while moving is really the last thing you should do, I have tryed this out in the boonies, just to see if it could be done and not crash the bike, it can but in a road rage situation, you on your bike will most likely come out on the bad end of it, as far as just carrying your weapon while riding, carry it however you would normaly just be sure your setup is very secure, you don't want your gun comeing loose while gettin down the interstate
 

Hamilton Felix

New member
Good Points.

I agree, it's highly unlikely one will be shooting while riding (it does look cool in action movies, though).

My riding apparel includes a First Gear Kilimanjaro jacket and matching pants. Since I normally carry in deep concealment, inside my shirt, the additional layer makes accessing my pistol a long drawn-out process.

My black & gray Kilimanjaro has a "half belt." Not long ago, I purchased a black Wilderness Safepacker. It didn't work out for my wife, but it occurs to me that one of these (or even a pair) hung on the half belt would appear to be merely more pocket storage on a jacket that already had lots of pockets.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Link Removed
This article came to my attention yesterday. I think you'll find it relevant to this thread. I find it particularly relevant because it happened 2 days ago, about 20 minutes from my apartment:

Worcester Telegram & Gazette - telegram.com - Motorcyclist beaten, stripped, robbed

It's certainly thought-provoking. While NO ONE can say for sure that being armed would have helped the rider (since none of us were there, and there are a lot of variables) there are a few questions that come to mind:

  • Could the driver have sped off? Perhaps "split lanes" to get to the intersection, then done a "right turn on red" onto the shoulder, using it as a getaway lane? Remember, when there's danger, those lines are just there for guidance They aren't jersey barriers. (Ride OR shoot? Choice is to ride.)

  • Had the driver been armed, perhaps he could have defended himself? My initial thought would be (upon seeing the first armed assailant) to hit the kill switch, drop the bike while dismounting, present firearm, and start shooting. This is assuming that riding off isn't an option for whatever reason. (Ride OR shoot? Choice is to shoot.)

  • Or perhaps a better idea would have been to stay atop the bike, firing at the armed assailant? It leaves open the option of dismounting/dropping if you can't ride and have to run. It also leaves open the option of stuffing your firearm into your jacket and riding off once the traffic starts moving (which may happen quickly once shots are fired). This scenario could be described as "Shoot THEN ride."

I certainly don't have the answers. Again, one's action would have to depend on the situation. But it's certainly worth more thought and discussion.

Sums up the options pretty nicely. All of which the firearm is on the primary side. Even when the motorcycle is at a stop, the left hand will be on the clutch so you won't be able to draw left handed anyways. Unless you keep your motorcycle in neutral at lights in which case either hand will work.

When I get on a motorcycle, I make sure my weapon is secure for highway speeds, and I prepare my mind for any quick escapes that might come up. It takes a lot of awareness just to ride the motorcycle, I don't see how drawing a firearm while riding can be safe in any way.

Added a picture of my motorcycle! What do all of yours looks like?
 

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