Appalachian Trail Conservancy does not like guns on the trail


45pocketpistol

New member
Just read this BS on their website...

ATC strongly discourages hikers from carrying firearms: Most experienced A.T. hikers consider them impractical and unnecessary, and encountering an armed stranger makes many people uncomfortable.

I am going to Smokey Mountain National Park next month for my honeymoon, and I plan to hike part of the trail. My Ohio CCW is honored in North Carolina, so why should I choose not to protect myself and my new wife from bear, wolf, poisonous snakes, and criminals? The whole point of CONCEALED is so people don't feel "uncomfortable".

What say you?
 

Hoganbeg

Member
Who cares what the ATC thinks? It's not their call! Do what you feel comfortable with. Consider these facts. 1. You most likely won't use it and the weight will become a burden. 2. If you do need it, you will most likely be miles from any official help. 3. If you do need it, it will most likely be for protection from two legged predators, not four. Finally, have fun!
 

TekGreg

New member
I'm a bit confused as to how the ATC "strongly discourages" anything. Do they glower at you if they think you might be carrying a firearm when you enter the park? Maybe a "Time Out" if you're caught with it on your person or a stern talking to?

Sorry, but I tire of uninformed, ill-mannered people trying to force their will on others. You have legally obtained your permit; you intend to legally carry it in the manner stated by law; you only intend to use it in defense of your life or the life of others that you are legally allowed to defend from threat of imminent danger or death; unless defending yourself, no one will even be aware that you are armed.

What was the purpose of taking the classes, buying the gun, paying for training and ammunition if you have no intention to carry it to defend yourself...and your reason for not carrying it to defend yourself is because other campers might feel uncomfortable??? Bah! The "other campers" are those that have chosen not to carry guns mainly because they are uninformed and scared of them and believe them inherently evil. As such, they believe anyone else carrying them must be a "Gun Nut" and just looking to shoot something...anything! Do not let their uninformed fears dictate how...and if...you defend your family.
 

45pocketpistol

New member
I most likely will never use my weapon

Who cares what the ATC thinks? It's not their call! Do what you feel comfortable with. Consider these facts. 1. You most likely won't use it and the weight will become a burden. 2. If you do need it, you will most likely be miles from any official help. 3. If you do need it, it will most likely be for protection from two legged predators, not four. Finally, have fun!

Thanks for responding. I most likely will never use my weapon. Does that mean I should never carry it? My CCW instructor, and many others who know a lot more about guns than I do, advocate always carrying within legal limits. As in all situations, if I thought there was going to be trouble, I would not go. Besides, I cannot even begin to imagine the guilt I would feel if something happened to my new bride because I decided not to bring my gun.

My conceal weapon ways about as much as a pair of hiking boots. Weight will not be an issue.
 

45pocketpistol

New member
@TekGreg

Thank you for responding. You bring up several interesting points. Your comment about the other campers is probably true in the vast majority of cases. However, it should be safe to assume that some of them are also legally carrying for their own protection, unbeknownst to me.

Secondly, my fiance is one of the "uninformed and scared". She has fallen for the popular myth that guns are inherently evil. But, she is making an effort to understand guns and to confront her fears. She is not ready to use one (expecting that I will use mine to protect her). She knows that the fear is irrational, and admits the validity of the pro-gun argument. I suspect it will take some time for her to become comfortable with me always carrying. At least she is making an effort. I wish all people were strong enough to confront their fears instead of blaming others for their psychological issues.
 

Hoganbeg

Member
Thanks for responding. I most likely will never use my weapon. Does that mean I should never carry it? My CCW instructor, and many others who know a lot more about guns than I do, advocate always carrying within legal limits. As in all situations, if I thought there was going to be trouble, I would not go. Besides, I cannot even begin to imagine the guilt I would feel if something happened to my new bride because I decided not to bring my gun.

My conceal weapon ways about as much as a pair of hiking boots. Weight will not be an issue.


I was merely pointing out the salient facts of the situation. In fact, I believe you would be wise to carry. As far as weight goes, I assumed you would be backpacking where weight, even a couple of extra pounds, is always an issue. The further you hike, the bigger the issue. It comes down to a matter of priorities-Safety is always first.
 

nogods

Active member
I belong to several trail clubs - local, state, regional, and national.

Most are sophisticated enough to stay out of gun debates. They define their mission in such a way that firearms are irrelevant. But every so often, an anti-gun member will get elevated to a directorship position and propose an inane anti-gun or anti-hunting proposition.

I'll bet most ATC members would say "I don't care if people carry firearms on the trail, I want to hike, not engage in political discourse while on the trail..."
 

FN1910

New member
I belong to several trail clubs - local, state, regional, and national.

Most are sophisticated enough to stay out of gun debates. They define their mission in such a way that firearms are irrelevant. But every so often, an anti-gun member will get elevated to a directorship position and propose an inane anti-gun or anti-hunting proposition.

I'll bet most ATC members would say "I don't care if people carry firearms on the trail, I want to hike, not engage in political discourse while on the trail..."

I think your answer is right on! We had a fellow speak at our men of the church dinner a few months ago who had recently hiked the entire Appalachian trail from one end to the other the previous summer. He was asked about carrying a gun and he just shrugged it off as saying he never thought about it and didn't know of any of the other hikers that really gave it much of a thought one way or the other. One thing the he did point out was that much of the trail is on private land and almost any shelters or other type of rest areas including the hostels are privately built maintained and owned. So while hiking you have to keep that in mind. As you say most are interested in hiking and not gun debate so any reference to guns while hiking is probably only one persons idea and taken as that.
 

coachdb18

New member
Who cares what the ATC thinks? It's not their call! Do what you feel comfortable with. Consider these facts. 1. You most likely won't use it and the weight will become a burden. 2. If you do need it, you will most likely be miles from any official help. 3. If you do need it, it will most likely be for protection from two legged predators, not four. Finally, have fun!

Being a NC resident who hikes and camps a lot in western Carolina (to include those sections of the AT), I'd have to say you have a better than average chance of encountering not only bears, but also rabid fox, skunks, copperheads, etc ...

You have to also know that a lot of folks that fashion themselves to be outdoor types are also Sierra Club liberal types that have more agenda than sense, often very anti-gun, and some of those will try to push their political views. I had a very heated battle with one such type that made me glad I carry, as his views on being 'peaceful' were just plain coercive and the guy was just a full blown control freak.

I've also experienced a couple of cases where individuals I came across were just not right in the head (managed to get park rangers involved in one case, who added my info to a longer list of problems from the guy).

My advice: Carry, you're in the wild, literally!
 

SR9

New member
I have read and heard of many stories of people gone missing or killed while trail hiking in the Appilachians. Bet they weren't carrying, but wish they were.
 

apvbguy

New member
Just read this BS on their website...

ATC strongly discourages hikers from carrying firearms: Most experienced A.T. hikers consider them impractical and unnecessary, and encountering an armed stranger makes many people uncomfortable.

I am going to Smokey Mountain National Park next month for my honeymoon, and I plan to hike part of the trail. My Ohio CCW is honored in North Carolina, so why should I choose not to protect myself and my new wife from bear, wolf, poisonous snakes, and criminals? The whole point of CONCEALED is so people don't feel "uncomfortable".

What say you?
the libertard fruits and nuts are only offering their opinion which means nothing legally, bring your gun carry it how you want as long as it is legal and that is that
 

coachdb18

New member
The one question I faced was where my carry was legal, as my hiking does often cross state lands/parks, etc. Thankfully, we had a new law passed this past year that made carrying in such areas legal, by virtue of state law. I also run a kayak group, and routinely carry on the water, where not only keeping it available, but also free of salt water is a consideration. My solution is to keep my weapon in a day hatch, which is right behind me, along with my water (or water filter on fresh water) and snacks. Wildlife, either 2 or 4 legged (or non legged in the case of poisonous snakes), is always a concern to be ready for.
 

Gettysburg Bill

Gettysburg Bill
Who cares what the ATC thinks? It's not their call! Do what you feel comfortable with. Consider these facts. 1. You most likely won't use it and the weight will become a burden. 2. If you do need it, you will most likely be miles from any official help. 3. If you do need it, it will most likely be for protection from two legged predators, not four. Finally, have fun!

Years ago I was on the trail weekly.
I agree!
 

TRB

New member
Ultralight hikers are known to hike with only a razor blade, rather than a knife, to save weight. Their philosophy is to take only what is needed. Gear is deemed unnecessary if it has not been used in an arbitrary (last three hikes, last three years, etc) time period. The protocol does not take into account wild animal attacks or human assault. Classic case of ignoring the Monte Carlo fallacy.
 

coachdb18

New member
When I want to shed weight for a hike, I pack my 27 oz 2" .357 Magnum, and leave my 4" 47 oz Ruger .44 Magnum Redhawk at home... just sayin'....
 

NCIC105

New member
I'll carry mine...If you have ever hiked this trail you know you will meet some very seedy people...You would not be the first to disappear on this trail!


I grew up in Franklin, NC right off the trail, and we had some strange folks come out of the woods and knock on our door...Some at midnight...Dad had a standing rule...If you knocked on our door after dark you were met by him and his four boys. Each with a weapon in our hands...My dad was full-blooded Lakota Sioux, and he did not have a lot of trust for strangers...

Do your own search, Here is a quick search I did..

Link Removed
 

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