Another reason to carry


Firefly

New member
Stepping out of my house the other day I was accosted by two large dogs. One a German Sheppard and the other a Pit Bull. Why is it people who own these type animals can't keep them in their yards? I managed to back the dogs down after they charged to within a few feet and I retreated back to my front door. Called the police who made a call on the owners. I'll probably see these dogs again. Had I had my small Rat Terrier with me or if I had been a child or woman I don't think this incident would have ended so well. My point is, you never know when you may have to defend yourself or others, even when just going to the mailbox. It's another reason to Carry.
 

I live in a rural area, there's lots of strays in the around. I never walk down the hill to the mailbox without my sidearm. Gotta be careful, even in residential areas.
 

aj's 40 cal

New member
a knife or pepper spray would of worked well in the situation as well. i had to mace a dog once, he never came back around my area again.

be safe.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Glad everything was ok. Large dogs can be very dangerous. I own two pitbulls, and even though they have shown no sign of aggression, they have never, and will never, get loose without my control. None of my dogs, even my Labradors, were let loose. Not all owners of these large dogs are irresponsible, but it is a shame there are so many irresponsible dog owners in general.
 

Phillip Gain

New member
In response to:

Why is it people who own these type animals can't keep them in their yards?

I submit that when a poodle or Yorkie gets loose, no one notices or cares. So I don't think blame can fairly be placed on "those people with the big dogs." I'm sure there are about as many irresponsible owners of ankle biters.
 

hazard123

New member
Maced a chow when delivering mail one time. Never saw it close on the route again. Still laughing 30 some odd years later.,
 

Firefly

New member
Thanks for insights

I appreciate the feedback. Spray would probably work in many instances although I believe I would not trust anything less than Bear Spray. Once a pit bull has you in it's grasp I don't believe anything less than a 9mm will fit the bill to stop that attack. I have to modify my statement about "large dogs". I have never read or seen where a lab or Australian shepherd or other such dogs known to be pleasant, attack and injure someone severely. I'm sure it has happened. The facts are, pit bulls, German shepherds, rottweilers and chows are responsible for almost all serious injury and deaths caused by dogs in the US. These animals are born to attack and even when raised by caring owners are known to attack and even kill humans. It is in their genes just as bird dogs are born to point and rat terriers are born to squirrel hunt and sheep dogs herd sheep. I would argue that lions and tigers can be trained not to kill and are used in shows and even kept in homes. If, however, you believe that the natural instinct of lions and tigers can be totally removed by a caring owner, you are putting yourself and others in danger. Just ask Roy Horn. Here are the facts. [In 2010, the combination of pit bulls (22) and rottweilers (4) accounted for 79% of all fatal attacks. In the 6-year period from 2005 to 2010, this same combination accounted for 71% (129) of the total recorded deaths (181).] See that number? 181 deaths. These were mostly children and many were children of the dog owners. Google "dog attacks in the US." These dogs only account for about 5% of the dog population in the US but make up almost 80% of deadly attacks. I have personally known 2 women who had terrible scars on their faces because they were attacked by dogs when children. No, it wasn't beagles or dachshunds...they were pit bulls. The response of the owners in both instances, "They have never done that before." Ask yourself-Why don't the police, rescue and military use pit bulls? One human life, one child is more important than all the pit bulls in the world. I'm sure someone will disagree. Facts are such pesky things.
 

reinoehl117

New member
Obviously, the facts are what they are. Pit bull-type breeds have more strength and innate physical ability than most others, so they tend to be the dogs of choice for criminals and other irresponsible owners. So you should expect those percentages to look scary and extreme. Those statistics prove nothing, and I would argue that you'd see similar results if any other breed/type was as systematically abused. With that said, I certainly agree and understand that they have the potential to be dangerous; responsible owners take steps to mitigate that risk and control their dogs.

Additionally, pit bulls have never been bred to attack humans. They were bred for dog fighting... and different types of aggression (related to food, territory, humans, or animals) normally operate independently. Historically, those that displayed aggression toward human handlers weren't bred. And I can't speak with any authority about dogs used for military work or law enforcement, but pit bulls are used for search & rescue.

Back to the original point: I certainly agree that aggressive dogs and other animals present another good reason to carry.

Just my $.02
 

The_Outlaw

~The Dude Abides~
Stepping out of my house the other day I was accosted by two large dogs. One a German Sheppard and the other a Pit Bull. Why is it people who own these type animals can't keep them in their yards? I managed to back the dogs down after they charged to within a few feet and I retreated back to my front door. Called the police who made a call on the owners. I'll probably see these dogs again. Had I had my small Rat Terrier with me or if I had been a child or woman I don't think this incident would have ended so well. My point is, you never know when you may have to defend yourself or others, even when just going to the mailbox. It's another reason to Carry.

I have thought about this type of scenario as well. But I would probably recommend allowing the dog to give you at least 'one good bite' before finally putting a cap in it's sorry butt. Looks much better on the police report i.m.o.
 

DukeYukon

New member
I enjoy taking long walks through the country and forest, and always arm myselft with a stout walking stick when I venture out. Yes, my pistol is always on my hip, but it is more of a secondary weapon. The stick is already in your hand and, since it becomes over time like an extension of yourself, can be brought into play in a split second.

I've used the stick to knock an attacking cottonmouth and a crazed possum out of my way before. I've had barking dogs get too close for comfort on several occasions. Just raising the stick to deliver a strike has usually been enough to keep them at bay. Only once did I have to whack a dog with it. He whimpered, then tucked his tail and ran. I didn't feel good about that. I would have had no problem taking the stick to his owner, though.

It's worked for me. I suppose you need to check your state/local laws to make sure it's legal to tote one. There may be some crazy ordinances that require you to provide proof of medical necessity just to carry a cane.
 

Iam2Taz

New member
A knife? Seriously?
Well you stick your thumb in his mouth and grip the lower jaw and it will paralyze him. Oh, wait, thats large mouth bass.

Yeah, don't think I want a knife as a primary against a dog. It would be better than nothing though.
 

Saltcreek

New member
I have thought about this type of scenario as well. But I would probably recommend allowing the dog to give you at least 'one good bite' before finally putting a cap in it's sorry butt. Looks much better on the police report i.m.o.

You have apparently never been bitten by a pit bull. One bite in the wrong place can result in a life altering or disfiguring injury, or worse. Their jaws can lock so you can't get them off without great effort,that is how they are designed and God help you if you are elderly, a female or child. Most state laws specifically allow an attacking dog to be killed. Do you honestly want to politically correct at the risk of death?
 

reinoehl117

New member
You have apparently never been bitten by a pit bull. One bite in the wrong place can result in a life altering or disfiguring injury, or worse. Their jaws can lock so you can't get them off without great effort,that is how they are designed and God help you if you are elderly, a female or child. Most state laws specifically allow an attacking dog to be killed. Do you honestly want to politically correct at the risk of death?

Their jaws don't lock; they just don't like to let go. But that's a minor point. I've never experienced it personally, but knowing what I do, there's no way I would wait to be bitten first (regardless of the dog's breed).
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Firefly:251347 said:
I appreciate the feedback. Spray would probably work in many instances although I believe I would not trust anything less than Bear Spray. Once a pit bull has you in it's grasp I don't believe anything less than a 9mm will fit the bill to stop that attack. I have to modify my statement about "large dogs". I have never read or seen where a lab or Australian shepherd or other such dogs known to be pleasant, attack and injure someone severely. I'm sure it has happened. The facts are, pit bulls, German shepherds, rottweilers and chows are responsible for almost all serious injury and deaths caused by dogs in the US. These animals are born to attack and even when raised by caring owners are known to attack and even kill humans. It is in their genes just as bird dogs are born to point and rat terriers are born to squirrel hunt and sheep dogs herd sheep. I would argue that lions and tigers can be trained not to kill and are used in shows and even kept in homes. If, however, you believe that the natural instinct of lions and tigers can be totally removed by a caring owner, you are putting yourself and others in danger. Just ask Roy Horn. Here are the facts. [In 2010, the combination of pit bulls (22) and rottweilers (4) accounted for 79% of all fatal attacks. In the 6-year period from 2005 to 2010, this same combination accounted for 71% (129) of the total recorded deaths (181).] See that number? 181 deaths. These were mostly children and many were children of the dog owners. Google "dog attacks in the US." These dogs only account for about 5% of the dog population in the US but make up almost 80% of deadly attacks. I have personally known 2 women who had terrible scars on their faces because they were attacked by dogs when children. No, it wasn't beagles or dachshunds...they were pit bulls. The response of the owners in both instances, "They have never done that before." Ask yourself-Why don't the police, rescue and military use pit bulls? One human life, one child is more important than all the pit bulls in the world. I'm sure someone will disagree. Facts are such pesky things.

Read this...or we could go through this whole ordeal again....

To sum it up...

Someone else here asked these exact same questions. And so I searched. Police, military, search/rescue, and therapy use American Stafford Shire Terriers. So ask yourself, if they do use them, why do you dislike them? The statistics you posted, did you get those from the CDC report? The report that used news reports, which are biased against pit bulls, in its research? The report that said it was inaccurate because they had to use the main stream media? The report that referenced the Pickney and Kennedy dog bite study, that had German Shepards and Huskies above the ABPT/AST. The report that has a "Pit Bull type" as well as "Pit Bull" becuase they can't garuantee the exact breed of each instance. The report that said, " Although fatal attacks on humans appear to be a breed-specific problem (pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers), other breeds may bite and cause fatalities at higher rates. Because of difficulties inherent in determining a dog’s breed with certainty, enforcement of breed-specific ordinances raises constitutional and practical issues. Fatal attacks represent a small proportion of dog bite injuries to humans and, therefore, should not be the primary factor driving public policy concerning dangerous dogs."

What were these animals born to do? Have you done any research on the origins of a ABPT/AST? Here's a quick recap. Bull dogs bred for bull baiting. Bull baiting becomes illegal. Bull dogs bred with terriers. Bull terriers used for fighting (which was illegal, and as another poster stated, weren't bred if they had a tendency to attack humans). Brought over to the States where they were used for herding, gaurding, hunting, and family pets. Did you know the APBT/AST has one of the highest passing rates for the American Temperment Test? With a 85.3% passing rate, Pitbulls make better family pets than Golden Retrievers and Collies.

A little research would help. Start here Pitbulls or here Don't Bull my breed.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Saltcreek:251463 said:
I have thought about this type of scenario as well. But I would probably recommend allowing the dog to give you at least 'one good bite' before finally putting a cap in it's sorry butt. Looks much better on the police report i.m.o.

You have apparently never been bitten by a pit bull. One bite in the wrong place can result in a life altering or disfiguring injury, or worse. Their jaws can lock so you can't get them off without great effort,that is how they are designed and God help you if you are elderly, a female or child. Most state laws specifically allow an attacking dog to be killed. Do you honestly want to politically correct at the risk of death?

You mean like this bite?....o wait this was a labrador bite. Apparently you haven't been bitten by a Lab. One bite in the wrong place can result in a life altering or disfiguring injury, or worse.
 

The_Outlaw

~The Dude Abides~
You have apparently never been bitten by a pit bull. One bite in the wrong place can result in a life altering or disfiguring injury, or worse. Their jaws can lock so you can't get them off without great effort,that is how they are designed and God help you if you are elderly, a female or child. Most state laws specifically allow an attacking dog to be killed. Do you honestly want to politically correct at the risk of death?

Actually I have been bitten 'accidentally' by my red nosed pit bull back in 2005.
It hurt like hell and his jaw was like a vice grip, but he let go of me as soon as he realized his mistake (We were roughhousing with some chew rope and he accidentally got a hold of my shoulder.)
American Staffordshire Terriers (Pit Bulls) do have very strong jaw pressure, but their jaws don't 'lock up'. That's just not true.
As far as your statement about shooting an attacking dog, I actually agree with you!
However, I truly think that it would definately be a hell of a lot more convincing to the Judge and Jury in any Defendants 'dog shooting case' to prove your case of 'self defense' if you had at least one bite to your leg or arm. Just my .02 cents.
 

NCIC105

New member
I see serious wounds will need to be treated if you go at a dog with a knife!

At my age I'm too chicken sh!t to go after one with a knife...I'd just as soon use my 45 or as others have mentioned a good walking staff, or both, and a truck, back up shooter, hand grenade, missile...Well you get it...

Yes I was bitten and dragged as a child by a chow....Now I have dogs. Cockers....Took me years to ever trust any dog....I never would work around the K-9 teams when in LEO...They show up I got in the car or left.....

Sorry I'm a whimp when it comes to big dogs....
 

wizard

New member
Firefly, it is unfortunate that you are so afraid of large dogs and feel the way you do. There are way to many irresponsible dog owners. I own a large German Shepard. A wonderful dog that we rescued from a bad home. I worried about him becoming aggressive, as he was abused severely. I am happy to say that he has become an awsome dog, gentle and loving. He is protective of our home and his family. I will probably never own a different breed. I don't beleive that any dog breed is totally safe, they all have teeth and that is there main tool. I do feel that if the two dogs mentioned were truely dangerous they would not have stopped a few feet away. They should not have been out running around. I am glad you are safe and uninjured.
 

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