Advice on "pushing"


Hey guys,

I've done some range work recently and loaded up some snap caps. WOW! I was flinching pretty bad. Any tips/suggestions on correcting this other than just focusing on trigger pull?
 

Hey guys,

I've done some range work recently and loaded up some snap caps. WOW! I was flinching pretty bad. Any tips/suggestions on correcting this other than just focusing on trigger pull?


Concentrate on "trigger squeeze" rather than "trigger pull". You want to put even pressure on the trigger until it breaks. The actual "click" should be a surprise. You know it's gonna go off, but don't know the exact moment. Check the placement of your trigger finger on the trigger. You should be squeezing the trigger with the tip of your finger, approx. 1/2 way between the tip and your first joint.



gf
 
Thanks, i'll put some thought as to finger placement. I never really had a problem shooting but I have always shot a bit low. I'm assuming that anticipating has something to do with that. Strange, I can get better advice online than in person with an instructor..? (I do realize you're an instructor GF)

"Consider putting a 3.5lb trigger on it" was the local guys opinion...didn't want to fix the problem on this one particular handgun...but rather cure the problem so I don't have to mod out all of my pistols.
 
Concentrate on "trigger squeeze" rather than "trigger pull". You want to put even pressure on the trigger until it breaks. The actual "click" should be a surprise. You know it's gonna go off, but don't know the exact moment. Check the placement of your trigger finger on the trigger. You should be squeezing the trigger with the tip of your finger, approx. 1/2 way between the tip and your first joint.



gf

+1... I found what made the biggest difference for me is how much trigger finger I used. By using just you finger tip you'll be less likely to push or pull shots. After that just like Glock Fan said it's all about the "squeeze".
 
Thanks, i'll put some thought as to finger placement. I never really had a problem shooting but I have always shot a bit low. I'm assuming that anticipating has something to do with that. Strange, I can get better advice online than in person with an instructor..? (I do realize you're an instructor GF)

"Consider putting a 3.5lb trigger on it" was the local guys opinion...didn't want to fix the problem on this one particular handgun...but rather cure the problem so I don't have to mod out all of my pistols.

I personally would work on fixing the technique that's causing the issue instead of modifying the gun to mask it.

If I had to guess I would say that you are anticipating the recoil and like a lot of people start to lean forward to compensate the recoil. This would cause you to shoot low.

Next time you go to the range take a buddy and some of those snap caps. Have your buddy load your mag randomly adding a snap cap. You'll have no idea if it's going to be a live round or a dummy. When you come across the dummy you and your buddy will be able to tell if your pulling, leaning into, pushing, ect. You'll goal is to here a click without the gun moving.

Hope this helps...
 
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I'll be going to the range on Friday afternoon or evening (just joined a 24/7 pistol club with full access to range!) and i'll post some pics of the target...
 
Another thing to consider is uniform grip. After the firing sequence, only release the trigger just enough to reset the action, then squeeze again. This helps immensely to keep your grip the same for every consecutive shot.

With my flinching, the easiest way I cured it was with my Ruger GP-100 loaded with full power .357 magnums. I know there is going to be recoil no matter what, so I concentrate on relaxing my mind for every shot fired. After about 100 rounds, it will become natural to just relax while shooting and enjoy it! Don't get an ego about it, just line up your sights and squeeze the trigger. Let the gun do the rest for you, and enjoy making holes!
 
See if the range sells special targets that diagnose shooting errors. The target is sectioned off where based on shot placement can give you a good idea of what you may be doing wrong. The targets come in "left hand shooter" and "right hand shooter". Be sure to purchase the rignt one. :wink:

I agree with Kimber. Get your fundamentals down before modifying any of your equipment. A 3.5 lb trigger is good for the range and competition, but extremely light for a SD firearm. The two basics that cause beginning shooters to mess up are "sight alignment" and "trigger squeeze".




gf
 
Awesome info guys! I carry a weapon on duty so its not an ego thing, a staying alive thing lol. I'm confident enough to carry, and the "bad guy" targets get torn up pretty good, but on the 8" target its depressing being on the 8point line lol

KimberPB- That is awesome!
 
Pistol Shot Analysis

check this out. It may help some:

Link Removed

Thanks, KimberPB. That analysis is "spot on" for me. A copy is going to the range with me this weekend, well, the next weekend we can get there anyway. My hubby and my g/f's will get copies, too. Thanks again for sharing it with us!
 
Dry fire in the double action mode until your front sight has little to no movement when you snap the trigger. Do not use the knuckle of your trigger finger. Use just the tip of the trigger finger and imagine pulling the trigger straight with the bore of the pistol. That's about as easy I can say it.

Dry Fireing is the most overlooked method of training.
 
Here is an Army method from the 80"s.
B.R.A.S.S.

Breathe. Relax. Aim. Sight. Squeeze.

Works for me.
 
Get someone to load a good sized revolver (skipping a few holes, or putting spent rounds in a few holes) then hand the weapon to you..
You will find out how much you are flenching when the gun moves 8 inches and goes "click" - a few times of this, and it will re-inforce in your brain to squeeze and be surprised when the gun goes "bang"..
 
Thanks for the advice everyone.

"No Agenda" and I went to the range today and paying attention to trigger pull helped out quite a bit. Usually i'm about 3" or more on what I aim at, and today was a big improvement. Also, he may post later but is there a reason why a Glock 19 would fail to lock the slide back after the last/final round has been fired?

This was on/off and happened several times..
 
Thanks for the advice everyone.

"No Agenda" and I went to the range today and paying attention to trigger pull helped out quite a bit. Usually i'm about 3" or more on what I aim at, and today was a big improvement. Also, he may post later but is there a reason why a Glock 19 would fail to lock the slide back after the last/final round has been fired?

This was on/off and happened several times..

Check your magazines. I mark all of my magazines, so if I have a problem on the range, first thing I do is switch out the magazine. This usually fixes this type of problem. Sometimes the follower is messed up. In most semi-auto pistols, the follower is what causes the slide to lock back after the last round is fired.

If you swap out the magazines and the problem persists, then it may be the gun. I've seen cases where improper assembly of the firearm or aftermarket accessories cause problems. If you can't figure out the problem, then I strongly suggest you get the gun checked out by a competent and properly trained Glock Armorer or gunsmith.



gf
 

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