adding same make, model and caliber guns to existing NV permit ??


rtj3

New member
First and foremost, I am a nevada resident, living in clark county and I have a current CC permit. I understand that Nevada's CC permit law requires that each semi-auto pistol that you want to carry, must be qualified with at the range and are listed on the CC permit by MAKE, MODEL AND CALIBER (revolvers are generic and qualifiying with only 1 revolver allows you to carry any revolver).

I currently have several pistols on my permit, one of which being a Sig P220 Combat (full size) .45 caliber. Almost a year later, I am now wanting to add ANOTHER pistol to my permit, which also happens to be a Sig P220 in .45 caliber, but is this one is the COMPACT model. This p220 compact of course is made by the same exact company and is the same exact model and caliber. The only difference of course is that it is a COMPACT model. My question is this......Does anyone living in Nevada with a CC permit, know for sure if I would still have to qualify with this pistol and go through the process of adding it to my permit even though the make, model and caliber are the same OR....would I NOT have to go through this since this new gun is exactly the sameas my p220 combat, except for the smaller frame size? Thanks for the help!
 

Seems to me that the serial number for each pistol listed on your permit was written down on the permit paperwork that my instructor had me fill out and take to the Sheriff or local peace officer for processing. So, even though the make, model, or caliber might be the same, or similar, or whatever, there might be a fine line to make a case that you would be carrying illegally because it really is not the exact same firearm. To be safe, call your instructor, or the LEO, and make sure you do it the right way, what ever way that may be. I believe the fee to the government to add another pistol is minimal. I don't know what the instructor might charge.
 
I think Nye County was the only one putting a serial number on the qualification sheet and they've since stopped due to complaints about "gun registration". You still need to check though because I think barrel length was on the paper as well.
 
I believe you're fine. Sig 220 45 should be sufficient for both guns. I had a Taurus 24/7 std., a 24/7 Compact and a 24/7 OSS all in 9mm. I only had to shoot 1 and the instructor said Taurus 24/7, 9mm as listed on my gun file sheet would cover any of them. Might not hurt to check with the sheriff on this where you live though. Serial idendification is not supposed to be listed for qualification as that would amount to a form of registration which may only be required in Clark Co. Even there, while you might have to register it you shouldn't have to re-qualify, but then again that's Las Vegas.

Good Luck!!!
 
Thanks for the replies guys.......Well, I did end up talking to a CCW instructor yesterday and he did confirm to me that I would be ok carrying a p220 compact, should I purchase one, WITHOUT having to qualify with it and fill out extra paperwork to add it. Reason being......he stated NV permits nolonger require the serial number for each weapon you qualify with and that the "powers that be" now only care about the make, model and caliber and this is all he has to fill out out on the paperwork now. The instructor further stated that even though I had to list all of the serial numbers of the weapons that I qualified with over a year ago and were submitted to LVMPD here in Vegas at that time, it no longer applies since they no longer require it. As long as your current permit ONLY lists on the back, the make, model # and caliber of your weapons and not a serial number, you may carry a similar weapon (smaller frame, barrel, diff. finish, or what ever the difference is) as long as the new gun is the same make, model # and caliber as whats already listed (for Nevada anyways). Sounds like I'm good to go then. :biggrin:
 
For those reading this thread keep in mind that only if you are in Clark County do you have to register your firearm with the local Sheriff IF YOU ARE A 60 DAY RESIDENT.

It seems to me, and I could be wrong, that if you travel to Nevada and get a non-res permit to conceal carry you do not have to register your firearms unless you are in Clarke County in excess of sixty days as a resident.

I stay in Clarke County, depart for a few days to LA and return. Am I considered a resident?
 
For those reading this thread keep in mind that only if you are in Clark County do you have to register your firearm with the local Sheriff IF YOU ARE A 60 DAY RESIDENT.

It seems to me, and I could be wrong, that if you travel to Nevada and get a non-res permit to conceal carry you do not have to register your firearms unless you are in Clarke County in excess of sixty days as a resident.

I stay in Clarke County, depart for a few days to LA and return. Am I considered a resident?

To determine residence might depend solely on what address is on your driver's license or where you spend the most time so maybe a utility bill would suffice. Seems to me that we discussed this a while back. I tried a search of the archives but came up empty. It's a good question, tho!
 
Seems to me that the serial number for each pistol listed on your permit was written down on the permit paperwork that my instructor had me fill out and take to the Sheriff or local peace officer for processing. So, even though the make, model, or caliber might be the same, or similar, or whatever, there might be a fine line to make a case that you would be carrying illegally because it really is not the exact same firearm. To be safe, call your instructor, or the LEO, and make sure you do it the right way, what ever way that may be. I believe the fee to the government to add another pistol is minimal. I don't know what the instructor might charge.

I rented a Kimber for my NV CCW permit, so the serial number really can't be used on your permit. I brought my 2 Glocks with me from MD and no one wrote down those serial numbers either.
 
To determine residence might depend solely on what address is on your driver's license or where you spend the most time so maybe a utility bill would suffice. Seems to me that we discussed this a while back. I tried a search of the archives but came up empty. It's a good question, tho!

Different states have different requirements; in some a drivers license will do fine. Others want to see more proof, like voter registration, tax bill, utility bill, whatever.
 
Different states have different requirements; in some a drivers license will do fine. Others want to see more proof, like voter registration, tax bill, utility bill, whatever.

Yup, you are correct, I've registered a niece in school and established residency with just a utility bill, in a different state than NV. However, the initial question asked about a NV permit so that is what I referenced. :biggrin:.
 
What a bogus requirement.

Say your "listed" pistol has to go back to the factory for repairs. Not at all unlikely, if it is a Taurus semi. So then what - you have to be naked until it's return?

Keep your fingers crossed that the Supremes overturn the Appellate decision in re: NRA/MacDonald vs. Chicago, coming up in March. Then we'll have to get "reasonable restriction" defined, but at least the several states will all realize that the 2nd Amendment applies to them and they better damn well stop creating all these ridculous, meaningless, bureaucratic and administrative hurdles to concealed carry by law abiding citizens.

That's almost as bad as Massachusetts requirement you belong to a gun club before they let you own a firearm.
Apparently there the concept of class privilege hasn't died off yet.
 
Say your "listed" pistol has to go back to the factory for repairs. Not at all unlikely, if it is a Taurus semi. So then what - you have to be naked until it's return?

Keep your fingers crossed that the Supremes overturn the Appellate decision in re: NRA/MacDonald vs. Chicago, coming up in March. Then we'll have to get "reasonable restriction" defined, but at least the several states will all realize that the 2nd Amendment applies to them and they better damn well stop creating all these ridculous, meaningless, bureaucratic and administrative hurdles to concealed carry by law abiding citizens.

That's almost as bad as Massachusetts requirement you belong to a gun club before they let you own a firearm.
Apparently there the concept of class privilege hasn't died off yet.

What possible effect would McDonald have on NV's rule on listing your handgun on your CCW permit? They will say it is for citizen safety ands liken it to a driving test.

I listed more than one for just that reason. I do admit some folks don't have more than one handgun. I liken it to having to leave your car in the shop and not have any transportation while it's being fixed.
 
What possible effect would McDonald have on NV's rule on listing your handgun on your CCW permit? They will say it is for citizen safety ands liken it to a driving test.

I listed more than one for just that reason. I do admit some folks don't have more than one handgun. I liken it to having to leave your car in the shop and not have any transportation while it's being fixed.


Simple - if the USSC rules that the 2A applies to states, the very next question that has to be answered is what restrictions will be allowed - but the answer will have to be a federal law, or additional USSC caselaw. There is no comparison to a drivers test, because driving is not a federally protected right.

Example: The 1A guarantees among other things, freedom of speech. The theory of incorporation (14A) makes that applicable to the states (no citation at hand, but this was decided via USSC precedent). Thus your freedom of speech is not regulated differently in Nevada than it is in Utah or Connecticut. Your right to say outrageous or unpopular things in Tennessee is protected also in Maine because of the Constitution, which trumps all state law purporting to abridge or infringe on your rights.

Currrent state laws addressing firearms are all over the map; i may be wrong but i believe the MacDonald case, if the 9th Circuit ruling is reversed, could result in a negation of the various and sundry state-level firearm laws. Some limitation of the RTKBA is inevitable; for example noone believes we will be free to purchase machine guns at the local Cabelas anytime soon. But the USSC will ultimatley hear cases concerning constitutionality of things like Nevada's requirement that you list your guns on your permit. It may even trigger another wave of states converting to Shall-Issue, to head off Federal preemption of their existing laws. I expect it will also probably open the door to national reciprocity.

Public safety is not enhanced one bit by Nevada knowing whether you're carrying a 9mm or a .44. Or by MA gun owners being required to belong to a gun club. Taking a firearm safety class? Seems like a reasonable prerequisite to ownership. Taking a live fire proficiency test for concealed carry? That could be argued to have merit also. My point is, this is likely to usher in national standards. Sort of the way the Miranda warning was born out of Miranda v. Arizona in 1966, to both protect a person's right to avoid coercive self-incrimination and to establish admissibility of evidence gained from a talkative suspect.
 
Simple - if the USSC rules that the 2A applies to states, the very next question that has to be answered is what restrictions will be allowed - but the answer will have to be a federal law, or additional USSC caselaw. There is no comparison to a drivers test, because driving is not a federally protected right.

Example: The 1A guarantees among other things, freedom of speech. The theory of incorporation (14A) makes that applicable to the states (no citation at hand, but this was decided via USSC precedent). Thus your freedom of speech is not regulated differently in Nevada than it is in Utah or Connecticut. Your right to say outrageous or unpopular things in Tennessee is protected also in Maine because of the Constitution, which trumps all state law purporting to abridge or infringe on your rights.

Currrent state laws addressing firearms are all over the map; i may be wrong but i believe the MacDonald case, if the 9th Circuit ruling is reversed, could result in a negation of the various and sundry state-level firearm laws. Some limitation of the RTKBA is inevitable; for example noone believes we will be free to purchase machine guns at the local Cabelas anytime soon. But the USSC will ultimatley hear cases concerning constitutionality of things like Nevada's requirement that you list your guns on your permit. It may even trigger another wave of states converting to Shall-Issue, to head off Federal preemption of their existing laws. I expect it will also probably open the door to national reciprocity.

Public safety is not enhanced one bit by Nevada knowing whether you're carrying a 9mm or a .44. Or by MA gun owners being required to belong to a gun club. Taking a firearm safety class? Seems like a reasonable prerequisite to ownership. Taking a live fire proficiency test for concealed carry? That could be argued to have merit also. My point is, this is likely to usher in national standards. Sort of the way the Miranda warning was born out of Miranda v. Arizona in 1966, to both protect a person's right to avoid coercive self-incrimination and to establish admissibility of evidence gained from a talkative suspect.

My point was not the legality or the ability of NV to know what you may carry. They will simply state that the requirement of listing your weapons is to show proficiency and knowledge of a deadly weapon, which a court will probably interrpret as a reasonable requirement and not one that would violate the 2A. NV would still be considered a shall issue state. The comparison to the drivers license was to illustrate the requirement to show proficiency in the name of public safety, not to compare a right or privilege.

being functionally "disarmed" because your gun needs to go out to be repaired would be irrelevant to NV as far as the 2A goes IMO.
 
simple - if the ussc rules that the 2a applies to states, the very next question that has to be answered is what restrictions will be allowed - but the answer will have to be a federal law, or additional ussc caselaw. There is no comparison to a drivers test, because driving is not a federally protected right.

Example: The 1a guarantees among other things, freedom of speech. The theory of incorporation (14a) makes that applicable to the states (no citation at hand, but this was decided via ussc precedent). Thus your freedom of speech is not regulated differently in nevada than it is in utah or connecticut. Your right to say outrageous or unpopular things in tennessee is protected also in maine because of the constitution, which trumps all state law purporting to abridge or infringe on your rights.

Currrent state laws addressing firearms are all over the map; i may be wrong but i believe the macdonald case, if the 9th circuit ruling is reversed, could result in a negation of the various and sundry state-level firearm laws. Some limitation of the rtkba is inevitable; for example noone believes we will be free to purchase machine guns at the local cabelas anytime soon. But the ussc will ultimatley hear cases concerning constitutionality of things like nevada's requirement that you list your guns on your permit. It may even trigger another wave of states converting to shall-issue, to head off federal preemption of their existing laws. I expect it will also probably open the door to national reciprocity.

Public safety is not enhanced one bit by nevada knowing whether you're carrying a 9mm or a .44. Or by ma gun owners being required to belong to a gun club. Taking a firearm safety class? Seems like a reasonable prerequisite to ownership. Taking a live fire proficiency test for concealed carry? That could be argued to have merit also. My point is, this is likely to usher in national standards. Sort of the way the miranda warning was born out of miranda v. Arizona in 1966, to both protect a person's right to avoid coercive self-incrimination and to establish admissibility of evidence gained from a talkative suspect.

Well said!
 
I rented a Kimber for my NV CCW permit, so the serial number really can't be used on your permit. I brought my 2 Glocks with me from MD and no one wrote down those serial numbers either.

Ok then, thx. Sounds as if that requirement has changed. I'll check on that to be sure I can carry all my 9s and 45s of the same types, calibers, etc., when I need to renew. It's nice to have backups of my backups that are the same. :biggrin:
 
Perhaps I am talking about two seperate things here but it was my distinct understanding that one only needed to list firearms in Clark County if one was a resident for more than 60 days (resident meaning that you are there in body).

Is this seperate from the requirement to list firearms thatyou have qualified with on our CCW permit? Jeez I have a bunch - if this is the case perhaps I will have to drag them all with me when I come to get my permit?

Regards
 
Perhaps I am talking about two seperate things here but it was my distinct understanding that one only needed to list firearms in Clark County if one was a resident for more than 60 days (resident meaning that you are there in body).

Is this seperate from the requirement to list firearms thatyou have qualified with on our CCW permit? Jeez I have a bunch - if this is the case perhaps I will have to drag them all with me when I come to get my permit?

Regards

Maybe we are. I don't live in Clark County, I'm in Nye. I don't know what is listed on the Clark County CCW. Luke may have a pic of one posted in the CCW permit forum, IDK. I tried to send him a pic of mine but somehow failed to get the picture to work. On my Nye County CCW card it's listed on the back what I qualified to cc, each pistol is listed separately. I don't know anything about the 60 day residency rule in Clark/Las Vegas. I'm sure there might be people on this forum who would know. Maybe netentity or gf or others.
 
Maybe we are. I don't live in Clark County, I'm in Nye. I don't know what is listed on the Clark County CCW. Luke may have a pic of one posted in the CCW permit forum, IDK. I tried to send him a pic of mine but somehow failed to get the picture to work. On my Nye County CCW card it's listed on the back what I qualified to cc, each pistol is listed separately. I don't know anything about the 60 day residency rule in Clark/Las Vegas. I'm sure there might be people on this forum who would know. Maybe netentity or gf or others.

I have a CCW from Clark County I received last month. All handguns are and MUST be listed on your permit, regardless of the length of time you stay. . I carried my 2 Glocks from MD and rented a Kimber whn I qualified because my travel case could not hold all 3 pistols.

Clark County has a separate law regarding registration. (The Blue card) Handguns with serial numbers must be registered with LVMPD if you are in Clark County for 60 contiguous days. If you go out of state for one day, the count starts again AFAIK.

The registration law applies even if you don't have a CCW permit.

IANAL
 

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
49,526
Messages
610,760
Members
74,962
Latest member
troydistro
Back
Top