Accidental Discharge question


I posted this under this forum because the quote above was in it and I don'y necessarily agree with it. A while back I bought a used Remington 700 in 30-06. It appeared to be in good shape and seemed to work fine. I cleaned if good and carried it out to test it out. everything seemed to work fine. When I decided to pack back up I had one shot in the chanber and one in the magazine. I unloaded the magazine and proceeded to remove the one from the chamber. This was and older model 700 and you could not unlock the bolt with the safety engaged. I pointed the gun in a safe direction, flipped the safety off and the gun fired. Talk about scaring the stuffings out of someone.

Was this a negligent discharge. I suppose I could have had it checked out by a gunsmith before trying it out. I possibly could have looked up the notice that Remington was willing to pay for the modification to allow it to be unbolted with the safety on. I could have fired all the rounds in it before packing up but that may have caused real problems.

I did take it bakc home and found that taking the safety off would cause it to fire about 1 out of 10 times and after a thorough cleaning and adjusting of the trigger it didn't do it any more.

Negligence is when your actions are not those of a normal responsible person. How many of you take very used gun you buy to a gunsmith to have fully checked out? I think there are some cases of accidental discharge.

I figure it this way.

IF THE GUN BREAKS OR MALFUNCTIONS (ie., slam fire due to a firing pin sticking),it's an ACCIDENT if the malfunction is happening for the FIRST time.

IF THE GUN BREAKS OR MALFUNCTIONS and the malfunction has occurred before, it's NEGLIGENCE.

Pretty much EVERY OTHER REASON IS NEGLIGENCE as far as I'm concerned.

Improper firearms handling is NEGLIGENCE.

Putting a Glock together with a round in the chamber is NEGLIGENCE.
 
Shouldn't have a round in the chamber when putting the rifle away anyway.

I'm not buying this story.
 
Shouldn't have a round in the chamber when putting the rifle away anyway.

I'm not buying this story.

Are you talking about my story? My SUV was parked 5' from where I was shooting. I was trying to get the round out of the chamber to put it away as you are recommending. Or were you referencing some other post? Any more DA comments?
 
I posted this under this forum because the quote above was in it and I don'y necessarily agree with it. A while back I bought a used Remington 700 in 30-06. It appeared to be in good shape and seemed to work fine. I cleaned if good and carried it out to test it out. everything seemed to work fine. When I decided to pack back up I had one shot in the chanber and one in the magazine. I unloaded the magazine and proceeded to remove the one from the chamber. This was and older model 700 and you could not unlock the bolt with the safety engaged. I pointed the gun in a safe direction, flipped the safety off and the gun fired. Talk about scaring the stuffings out of someone.

Was this a negligent discharge. I suppose I could have had it checked out by a gunsmith before trying it out. I possibly could have looked up the notice that Remington was willing to pay for the modification to allow it to be unbolted with the safety on. I could have fired all the rounds in it before packing up but that may have caused real problems.

I did take it bakc home and found that taking the safety off would cause it to fire about 1 out of 10 times and after a thorough cleaning and adjusting of the trigger it didn't do it any more.

Negligence is when your actions are not those of a normal responsible person. How many of you take very used gun you buy to a gunsmith to have fully checked out? I think there are some cases of accidental discharge.

It seems to me I've seen this as a known problem with some. You need contact the manufacturer. This is not a negligent discharge in my mind.
 
It seems to me I've seen this as a known problem with some. You need contact the manufacturer. This is not a negligent discharge in my mind.

I found out later that it was a safety problem and a recall had been issued on that series of Rem. 700. I took it to a gunsmith who replaced the trigger assembly with the new version on Remington's $. I figured that the reason that I got the gun so cheap was because the previous owner knew of the problem but not the recall.
 
An excellent example of why all preowned firearms should be thoroughly checked out. I've handled at least 3 bolt action rifles of 2 different brands that had the trigger "adjusted" to the point that slamming the bolt forward or pulling the trigger then releasing the safety would cause the striker to fall. One customer refused to let me fix the problem commenting that he could live with it since the trigger worked for him-I had him sign a statement to that effect before allowing the rifle out of the door. He later had an AD and traded the rifle off- I certainly hope the next owner got it fixed.
 
An excellent example of why all preowned firearms should be thoroughly checked out. I've handled at least 3 bolt action rifles of 2 different brands that had the trigger "adjusted" to the point that slamming the bolt forward or pulling the trigger then releasing the safety would cause the striker to fall. One customer refused to let me fix the problem commenting that he could live with it since the trigger worked for him-I had him sign a statement to that effect before allowing the rifle out of the door. He later had an AD and traded the rifle off- I certainly hope the next owner got it fixed.

Nope. He had a negligent discharge, not accidental.
 
I agree, there are certain rare occasions that I would classify as 'accidental' instead of negligent; such as your experience. It was a mechanical malfunction, with no negligence from the operator.

I had a similiar experience with an old SKS. The previous owner didn't take good care of it, and probably never cleaned it. I was demonstrating the action to a friend of mine, using live rounds, with the muzzle ponting in a safe direction. When I let the bolt go forward, the rifle slam-fired on it's own. Scared the crap out of both of us, but no harm was done. I didn't even know what a slam fire was at the time, I had my finger away from the trigger, but the gun malfunctioned. Although, I could have used dummy rounds if I had any.

I think one more catagory should be added to the quote, besides negligent and intentional...mechanical malfunction.

SKS has a free floating firing pin. It's not held back with a spring. If it was dirty and jammed, it could cause it to fire when the action went into battery.
 
Follow ALL the safety rules.

Accidental discharges happen every day. That still leaves no reason for anyone to get hurt.. Ive had several unintentional discharges for different reasons and never came near hurting anyone. Several times I had the hammer cocked and the sight on the target. As soon as my finger touched the trigger the revolver fired before I intended too. All things considered no one woukld have even known I fired unintentionally however I did. Embarassing as it is sometimes its avoidable. People do make mistakes but if you follow all of the safety rules only your pride should be injured.Just be carefull and follow ALL of the rules and no one will get hurt.
 
Definition of an accident

According to Wikipedia - "An accident is a specific, unidentifiable, unexpected, unusual and unintended external action which occurs in a particular time and place, with no apparent and deliberate cause but with marked effects."

Sounds like you qualify for accident. On the other hand, I had just started cleaning a .357 revolver about 30 years ago and pulled the trigger - shot a hole in my living room ceiling. That, brother, is pure negligence! And I remember it vividly - I have never had another "unintentional discharge" since, and hope I never do.

And I am still embarrassed by it, but maybe confession is good for the soul. :biggrin:
 
re: Accidental Discharge Question

Recently, MSNBC had a program called Remington Under Fire, about the design flaw in the Remington 700 series of bolt action rifles. While Remington denies it, there is a piece in the trigger/sear assembly that sometimes allows the rifle to fire when the safet y is released or if the rifle is bumped. A number of years ago, the designer responsible for the 700 designed another piece to go into the assembly that would lock the firing pin. This piece, whcih would have stopped the 700 series rifle from firing apparently by itself would have cost, in those days, 5.5 cents per rifle. Remington decided not to go that route, claiming that it was too expensive. Today, the same part would run $75 to $100 per gun, which would cost more than Remington's annual income. Normally, I don't accept accidental discharges, but with a 700, I would be leery of it.
 
Recently, MSNBC had a program called Remington Under Fire, about the design flaw in the Remington 700 series of bolt action rifles. While Remington denies it, there is a piece in the trigger/sear assembly that sometimes allows the rifle to fire when the safet y is released or if the rifle is bumped. A number of years ago, the designer responsible for the 700 designed another piece to go into the assembly that would lock the firing pin. This piece, whcih would have stopped the 700 series rifle from firing apparently by itself would have cost, in those days, 5.5 cents per rifle. Remington decided not to go that route, claiming that it was too expensive. Today, the same part would run $75 to $100 per gun, which would cost more than Remington's annual income. Normally, I don't accept accidental discharges, but with a 700, I would be leery of it.

I saw this posted somewhere else. Wasn't this an old problem and wasn't there a recall? It seems to me that it happened a couple of years or so ago. Or do I have this confused with another gun?
 
Took out his refrigerator.
:lol: I can't stop laughing. :sarcastic:

Oh ya. I'm laughing so hard, I forgot... that's what I looked at this thread for. I just saw a rerun of that program tonight on the Remington 700 malfunction. Pretty scary.
 
Didn't know that they made any semi-auto handguns that used "clips". Thought they were restricted to revolvers.


Broomhandlewithclipofammo.jpg
Semi-auto handgun with a "clip"

ClipMagazineLesson.jpg
Difference between a "clip" and "magazine"



gf
I always love this arguement as magazines are where powder, shells, ammo, clips are stored while a clip is what goes in the gun. :biggrin: Magazines existed before clips did. HMS Hood blew up because a shell hit the magazine. The USS Maine sank because the magazine exploded.

To be a magazine in the terms used here it has to have another word in front of it to be correct such as a box magazine, a tubular magazine, a rotary magazine, drum magazine, fixed magazine, etc.... :wink:


So far in 40+ years of handling guns, no accidental or unintentional discharges of any firearms and I hope it stays that way for atleast another 30+. I do have a shotgun that will slamfire but if you know it will, you take precautions not to accidentally do it.
 

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