A Tough Question to Put in Words...


Cowbilly32

New member
I have seen videos where a person at the range will draw his/her weapon and hold it close to the chest before extending the arms to aim and shoot. After the shot(s) he/she will bend the elbows and bring it close to the chest again. What I would like to know is, does this technique have a name? I would like to research why the technique is done but its kinda hard when I don't know what it's called. Can anyone help? Thanks in advance!
 

Deanimator

New member
I think the premise is that it makes the gun harder to snatch.

I'm old school. A normal "low ready" works for me.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
I have seen videos where a person at the range will draw his/her weapon and hold it close to the chest before extending the arms to aim and shoot. After the shot(s) he/she will bend the elbows and bring it close to the chest again. What I would like to know is, does this technique have a name? I would like to research why the technique is done but its kinda hard when I don't know what it's called. Can anyone help? Thanks in advance!



It's harder to grab a firearm when it's close to your body, than when your arms are extended. Keeping it pointed forward, instead of low, allows shots to be "point shot" as you extend out to sight picture.

I called it, staying inside your work zone...not sure if there is a specific term for it...maybe high ready?

I keep my work zone chest to head height, right in front of me. This allows me to keep my head up, eyes up, and still work my firearm for reloads and malfunctions.

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

tcox4freedom

New member
High ready with retention is what I've heard it called. The object is to keep the gun at the ready jic any other BGs show up. But, you also want to protect the gun from a possible grab.

Low ready is old school. But, I think it has it's place when you can be more relaxed. (IE; after the initial threat has been neutralized and you've scanned the area thoroughly for more possible threats.)

But, high ready with retention is the safest way to keep the gun ready for action while still assessing your surroundings. Not only can it help with retention, but, you can get back in the fight faster from high ready with retention than from low ready. You can can also control your muzzle better and be ready to go hth if you need to because your arms & elbows are in a better position to block and/or strike should a gun grab or grapple hold be attempted.


-
 

the dark

New member
Lots of different names for it; some call it close combat ready, some high ready. I have always called it retention ready and I prefer it to low ready, but that is just my opinion. As noted it is useful for weapons retention in close combat, potential hands-on type situations. I always draw through that position but again, JMHO.
 

mappow

New member
I do practice "High Ready" if I'm clearing a house. The thought is you don't want to extend your arms incase a BG (s) are around the corner and grab your extended weapon. Also with High Ready your usually at chest high with elbows tucked in with your weapon. This gives you line of sight with your weapon directly reflecting that. (if you train that way) Center Mass is center mass, if you discharge from your center mass and the BG is level with your CM then it's simplistic math.
If I'm not clearing, I roll with cocked & Locked. If, and only if, I have to draw (which is the final act to avoid -NOT evade) as my weapons clears holster and forearm parallels the ground. (if your dead center to my chest, I'm dead center to yours)
I will bust off two rounds. While doing so, lateral movement, evaluate target, scan area to ensure no other threats standing by. Repeat, move, as necessary.
 

BC1

,
I have seen videos where a person at the range will draw his/her weapon and hold it close to the chest before extending the arms to aim and shoot. After the shot(s) he/she will bend the elbows and bring it close to the chest again. What I would like to know is, does this technique have a name? I would like to research why the technique is done but its kinda hard when I don't know what it's called. Can anyone help? Thanks in advance!
It's often called "ready retained."
.
Consider "ready," "low ready" and "ready retained." The "ready retained" position keeps the gun in-close to the body to reduce the chances it can be grabbed. The gun is at mid thorax, both hands on the grip and pointed to the ground a few feet in front of you. Elbows in-tight to the body. One can even rotate the gun slightly for comfort without changing their grip. This position lends itself to close quarters areas, areas where a potential threat could spring out from the side and even in the dark where you may not see your threat until he's on you. From the "RR" position one can easily point-shoot by extending the arms at the target and firing.
.
However, don't confuse this with any part of the draw stroke. When drawing a gun during a threat you rotate upon clearing the holster allowing the gun to be fired at any point from post-draw to a fully aimed weapon. You join the support hand as the gun comes to lower thorax, extend and shoot. "Ready retained" position is not part of the draw. It's more a position of retention after the shot or while moving through tight/dark areas.
.
I teach this position in both courses NRA PPITH and PPOTH.
 

RJT CCW

New member
I know the position as High Compressed Ready, if the elbows are out, and it is taught by Rob Pincus and others. Two fold purpose: First, from the draw stroke it takes the gun to the center of the chest where the support hand can be easily added and then allows the gun to be punched straight out on target. Second, with the elbows out, gun close to the chest and angled down 45 degrees you will feel if someone is trying to do a reach around from behind, then if the gun is in low ready or high ready with elbows in.

Advantage over the low ready position is all physiological. To bring the gun up from low ready to a firing position you have to have the brain tell the arms to not only rise, but also stop once in position. From the High Compressed Ready you just punch the arms straight out and the body stops you when at full extension.

Each position has it's strengths and weaknesses depending on how the fight starts.
 

J.Boyette

Firearms Instructor
Its called High Compressed Ready.

The idea behind it is when you gain High Compresses Ready you can do the following:
  • Point shoot at this position
  • Close to the body work space area
  • Perform any level of Immediate & or Remedial Action
  • Break / Reset your sight picture

The press out allows you to focus on the target with your vision for a CLEAR and un obstructed view of the threat and for changing situations with the threat. You should also see the sights for a flash sight picture and pressing out if needed for target engagement on the way to full lock out. Once your elbows lock you should have a clear sight picture and focus shift from the target to the Front Sight.

If during any time of the engagement you need to move, find cover / concealment / reload / Perform any level of Immediate & or Remedial Action bring the pistol back into High Compresses Ready and perform the work. Once complete, search and assess and repeat as needed.

John
 

kerb

pinche gringo
Rob Leatham teaches this position as part of the draw stroke. He teaches a 3 step draw. A vertical move to chest high, establish grip, push weapon out to target.
 

BC1

,
Rob Leatham teaches this position as part of the draw stroke. He teaches a 3 step draw. A vertical move to chest high, establish grip, push weapon out to target.
Watch out for the TV lessons. Normally you would not draw a gun into a retained ready position when drawing for defense. The gun is rotated into position out of the holster, joined in front of the body and raised. You would not pull that gun back toward your body in a retained position.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Watch out for the TV lessons. Normally you would not draw a gun into a retained ready position when drawing for defense. The gun is rotated into position out of the holster, joined in front of the body and raised. You would not pull that gun back toward your body in a retained position.

I think he was saying the same thing, but left out the first rotation. After you break holster, firearm rotates towards target, from holster to chest firearm is pointed at the target moving vertically to your chest where it meets your reactive hand (if hand is not in use), hands meet and gun is pressed forward.

From the time it breaks holster to sight picture, you should be able to point shoot.

Not pulling the firearm back into the chest during the draw, and not swinging upwards in an arc (eliminating over travel).

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
The rotation of your wrist is also important to note for semi automatics. If the firearm is still down by your side when the first point shots are fired, there should be enough clearance for the slide to cycle.

I'm right handed, when i draw, the firearm is rotated up, and rotated clockwise just enough to keep the slide from snagging my ribs or shirt.

Left hand would be counter clockwise.

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

scarney

New member
Hollywood?

Ok, so my answer uncalled for. When you asked about the "up carry." I thought you were refereeing to:Link Removed

In this picture, the actor specifically poses with the firearm next to the head. To bring the firearm into play, there is a lot of arm movement, and not very safe. Looks good on film, but..... I had a friend who tried this with a revolver, and he blew a hole in the roof of the range. Needless to say, I'm not a fan of this "carry."

The carrying of the pistol close to the body, and punching straight out to fire is more effective, but does not work well in all situations. Especially if you are surrounded by other individuals. When accompanied by others, a SUL carry "may" be more effective and safer.

Best answer, try different positions, low ready, SUL and others, and remember, not everything works all the time.

Bottom line, anyone can be an @zz (including myself), don't take everything you read as gospel, and be safe out there.
 

Firefighterchen

OC for Tactical Advantage
Ok, so my answer uncalled for. When you asked about the "up carry." I thought you were refereeing to:Link Removed

In this picture, the actor specifically poses with the firearm next to the head. To bring the firearm into play, there is a lot of arm movement, and not very safe. Looks good on film, but..... I had a friend who tried this with a revolver, and he blew a hole in the roof of the range. Needless to say, I'm not a fan of this "carry."

The carrying of the pistol close to the body, and punching straight out to fire is more effective, but does not work well in all situations. Especially if you are surrounded by other individuals. When accompanied by others, a SUL carry "may" be more effective and safer.

Best answer, try different positions, low ready, SUL and others, and remember, not everything works all the time.

Bottom line, anyone can be an @zz (including myself), don't take everything you read as gospel, and be safe out there.

I didn't think SUL carry was meant for the draw?

As in, the draw to high compressed, the press to sight picture, back to high compressed. After that, if the threat is gone and you are going to move or if behind good cover and are going to stay, SUL position or holster to move/view surroundings and not sweep anyone.

Sent from my D6616 using USA Carry mobile app
 

J.Boyette

Firearms Instructor
SUL came to be by 7th SF group in SA.

They had a CT team that was of poor muzzle awareness so one of the advisers invented SUL one night to fix that problem.

And the rest is fake history and taken out of context. :)
 

kelcarry

New member
If the point is practice and I assume that is part of this equation, common sense would tell me that I should start from a position that is at least close to the initial position I would find my gun as I remove it from my holster--that would be near my waist by my body, not on and close to my chest. Hey--whatever grabs you
 

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